Arripis

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About Arripis

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    PILCHARD

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    Male
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    Sydney
  1. Hi Fishraiders, mrsswordfisherman has asked me to clarify some of the issues you guys are discussing. Inevitably, this becomes a bit of complex discussion because ti involves animal welfare and best-use-of-resource issues aside from the strict rules and regulations, but at least you guys consider these things when you are fishing which is very refreshing! So, strictly speaking, the regulations with respect to releasing undersized fish or fish caught in excess of the bag or possession limits are: 1) If a fish is caught which is below the minimum legal length or in excess of the the bag or possession limit for that species, it must be returned to the water regardless of condition. Irrespective of the species, being caught is stressful for the fish and there are many complications which arise as a result of capture (bleeding resulting from deep or gill hooking, exhaustion, barotrauma, to name a few). It is, of course, up to the fisher whether or not they choose to attempt to help a fish recover from capture-related stress and therefore release the fish in better condition to improve its chances of survival. This is an excellent guide to best practices for successful catch and release of a heap of popular recreational fish species (http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0005/605732/nsw-recreational-fishing-catch-and-release-handbook.pdf) - i think Paul may have already posted a link to this above. Sometimes however, despite the best efforts of the angler utilising all the best practices for that species outlined in the above document, the fish does not recover. If this occurs and the fish is undersize or in excess of the bag or possession limits, it must be returned to the water, even if severely impaired or even dead. This does not sit well with many people as essentially the fish is wasted, but unfortunately if this regulation was not back-or-white, there would be unscrupulous anglers who would take advantage of the loophole and intentionally keep undersized fish claiming that they could not be released. I doubt any of you guys would fall into this category 2) As far as fishing with underaged children goes (ie. less than 18), they are not required to have a licence, but still must adhere to size and bag/possession limits. So if you are fishing with two 10 year olds, the bag limit applies for each person fishing, not just the adult. The adult must be licenced however, even if not actually fishing. A full list of licence exemption circumstances can be found here (http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/fishing/recreational/recreational-fishing-fee/exemptions) Hope this helps. Feel free to reply to this post or email me directly at julian.hughes@dpi.nsw.gov.au with any queries and i will try to clarify any confusion cheers
  2. Hello Hawkesbury Hairtailers, NSW Fisheries and the University of Western Sydney are currently undertaking a long overdue research program on the biology and fishery for hairtail in NSW. As all of you know too well, hairtail are a fantastic and fascinating fish species that supports a small, but important recreational fishery at various times and places in NSW each year. Despite this, we know almost nothing about the fish or their fishery here. I am posting here as we need to recruit some passionate hairtail fishers to collect some data on these iconic fish. We are looking for volunteers to collect biological samples (heads with guts intact or the entire frame) or keep a diary of the lengths of the hairtail they catch, or both! From the heads and guts we can identify stomach contents, sex, stage in the reproductive cycle and remove the earbones to estimate how old the fish was. The diary data will give us a good handle on the sizes of fish caught in the rec fishery. This information will all assist us to assess the stock of this awesome fish species and manage them accordingly so that our kids can catch them (and a cold on a freezing winters night on the Hawkesbury!) in the future. So, if you are a keen hairtail fisher and are willing to help us out by collecting biological samples or diary lengths (or both), please contact The NSW Research Angler Program – research.angler@dpi.nsw.gov.au, 9435 4671 – We need your help! By the way, we will be at this years Hairtail Social where we will similarly be collecting hairtail heads-guts and lengths over the 3 days of the event. Regards, Julian Hughes
  3. Dear Fishraiders, please find attached the summer NSW Research Angler Program Newsletter! On behalf of Fisheries NSW, I would like to thank all of you who participate in the various components of the NSW Research Angler Program for your passion and enthusiasm. A big thank you to all of the research anglers and spearfishers out there who have donated their mulloway, snapper, tailor, kingfish and flathead frames this summer. We had 80 frames from donated to the program from summer covering the entire size spectrum of recreationally-caught fish - from just legal 30 cm tailor right up to 150 cm mulloway and 94 cm snapper! This information is priceless for researchers who study these iconic recreational fish species. We also had a further 65 mulloway tagged over summer and a record 14 recaptures, including a 113 cm fish which swam from Botany Bay 150 km north to Newcastle in 459 days growing 5 cm in the process! And don't forget, The NSW Research Angler Program is now seeking frame donations from two more new key recreational fish species in addition to mulloway, snapper, kingfish, dusky flathead and tailor. The new species are Spanish and spotted mackerel. So for all you North Coast mackerel enthusiasts, get out there, catch a feed, and give us the frame or the head! Remember, even if it is only one frame, we will do (almost) anything to get it! Many thanks once again for your involvement in this exciting new approach Fisheries NSW is taking to collect crucial data for NSW’s most popular recreational fish species. Please don't hesitate to contact me if you wish to discuss any aspect of the program. Thank you again and happy summer fishing for mulloway, snapper, kingies, duskies, tailor, spotties and Spaniards! Kind regards, Julian Hughes nsw-research-angler-program-newsletter-issue-10-march-2016.pdf
  4. Dear Fishraider members, please find attached the spring NSW Research Angler Program Newsletter (I know, a little late...summer newsletter to follow shortly!) On behalf of Fisheries NSW, I would like to thank all of you who participate in the various components of the NSW Research Angler Program for your passion and enthusiasm. A big thank you to all of the research anglers and spearfishers out there who have donated their mulloway, snapper, tailor, kingfish and flathead frames this spring. We had almost 100 mulloway frames donated to the program from spring covering the entire size spectrum of recreationally-caught fish - from just legal 70 cm soapies right up to some serious trophies! We also had numerous frames from snapper, tailor, kingfish and dusky flathead donated. This information is priceless for researchers (like me) who study these iconic recreational fish species. We also had over 200 mulloway tagged over spring and a record eleven recaptures! And don't forget, The NSW Research Angler Program is now seeking frame donations from four new key recreational fish species in addition to mulloway. The new species are snapper, yellowtail kingfish, dusky flathead and tailor. So now you can donate the frames from these species to research as well! This marks the start of an exciting new phase for the assessment of recreational fish stocks using data collected by recreational fishers. Remember, even if it is only one frame, I will do (almost) anything to get it! Many thanks once again for your involvement in this exciting new approach Fisheries NSW is taking to collect crucial data for NSW’s most popular recreational fish species. Please don't hesitate to contact me if you wish to discuss any aspect of the program. Thank you again and happy summer fishing for mulloway, snapper, kingies, duskies and tailor! Kind regards, Julian Hughes nsw-research-angler-program-newsletter-issue-9-december-2015.pdf
  5. Hi Fishraider members, please find attached the winter NSW Research Angler Program Newsletter: http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0007/529081/nsw-research-angler-program-newsletter-04-sept2014.pdf On behalf of Fisheries NSW, I would like to thank all of you who participate in the various components of the NSW Research Angler Program. A big thank you to all of the research anglers out there who have donated their mulloway frames to the program this winter. We managed to get over 80 frames donated to the program (including some BIG fish), which is great for research and great for mulloway! Hopefully there will be some warm stable weather ahead for spring and plenty more fish caught….and frames donated. Remember, even if it is only one frame, or a single jewel, we want it! Many thanks once again for your involvement in this exciting new approach Fisheries NSW is taking to collect crucial data for NSW’s most popular recreational fish species. Please don't hesitate to contact me if you wish to discuss any aspect of the program. Thank you again and happy mulloway hunting for spring. Regards, Julian Hughes NSW Research Angler Program Newsletter No. 4 - September 2014.pdf