arpie

Best Ever Tips For Blackie Fishing

121 posts in this topic

One last question. Under what kinds of circumstances would you cast your float away from you? I find that if it's in front of me i can have some kind of control over it, but if i cast it away then it will always get washed up on rocks just because it's been cast into an area that has wash around it.

Move to another spot so it stays in the strike zone better. If there are other people out there fishing for blackies, fish about 20ft from them. If there are no people out fishing for them, it could well be the wrong time to be there! Come back another time.

You don't always catch fish every time you go out! That is why it is called 'fishing,' not 'catching'!

Roberta

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This is a great thread!

Thankyou.

I grew up in The Sutherland Shire and I was taught to blackfish by my father and he was taught by his father. Most of our time was spent on a few rocks on the Woronora River at Bonnet Bay. We were sure to get a few there until the pylons of the new Woronora bridge went in. After that the water flow was confused and the spot become less productive. The rest of the lackfishing time was spent at Burrill Lake off the rocks at the horseshoe near Dolphin Point or in the vacinity of the bridge. I know that my grandfather and dad used to fish at Lake Illawarra and on the Minnamurra River between Dunmore and Kiama.

I've inherited all their gear- traces my grandfater made in the '60s (wrapped around newspaper wads), spirals of lead that he used instead of split shot, hooks, swivels rods and reels. Most of his tackle was in tabacco tins- handy in your pocket. I remember him telling me that sometimes he used to rub some of his tabacco in with his weed to bring them on the bite... Sounds a bit funny to me, but he swore by it.

We used to use bicycle inner-tube valve rubber and a match stick for a float stop. Now I get some of the beading strip out of some old vinyl cover chairs and use 2-3 mm lengths of this tube with a tooth pick broken to the same length. It's narrower and goes through the runners easier.

When I was young I was always wondering why I'd find doctors in the throat of blackfish if they were only vegetarians. Now I'm a bit more clued up. My mate's uncle used to fish for blackfish with earthworms ONLY as bait.

I haven't done any blackfishing for about 6 years. I've moved to Tasmania and only have just started exploring the blackfishing possibilities in the Tamar River near Launceston. I feel like a beginner again because very few people fish for them here but blackfish are apparently abundant. I read an article where the writer said that he's only encounterd ex-Sydneysiders fishing for blackfish and then they were exclusively estuary fishing and never off the rocks. Luderick

So, I'm in the dark as to where to go (other than using my own powers of deduction), where to find weed and specific tackle. I'll have to get into making my own.

I'm also looking at using a weed-like flies if I cannot get weed itself.

If anyone here has any Tasmanian blackfishing experience and cares to share I'd greatly appreciate it.

Edited by korg20000bc

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Hi korg20000bc

:1welcomeani::1welcomeani: To Fishraider. Sounds like you should have fun chasing down blackies in Tassie!! :1yikes:

Go Fish Pete (a sponsor of Fishraider) sells Weed Flies - I caught my first 'weed fly' blackie in late '08 & intend using them more this year! You can also buy 2 different colours of green in the 'yarn' & a brown, to make your own flies! Give them a go!

Great to hear of you reminiscing about your Dad & Grandfather's experiences of blackie fishing over time - your inherited tackle should take pride of place on the mantelpiece!

Look forward to hearing your reports of Tassie Blackies :)

Cheerio

Roberta

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Thanks for the kind words, Roberta.

How do you fish your fly? Do you strike earlier than you would with weed? Do the fish want to spit it earlier than with weed?

I looked at a weed pattern that uses "ice" material in the fly. It appears to be very similar to the photos in your first post. I looked at some "ice" at the fly shop today and it looked a bit too shiny.

The bloke who worked there recommended olive seal fur. Had any experience with other flies or fly material?

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Hi korg

I just fished it under a float as per usual, except I had a real weed bait on as well as the fly & was really surprised the weed fly went 'off' first. The fish just sucked it in & hooked itself really well & I just struck as normal, when the float dipped.

I believe the stuff I got from my local shop is called Ice & when it is wet, it is less shiney & also goes a bit darker too. When wet it goes as limp as real weed. You feather it towards the tail to give it that same 'wet shape'. Was the Ice made by Tiewell?

Is this the site you found to make the weed fly?

http://users.bigpond.net.au/flytying/weed_fly.html

I have heard of the seal fur weed fly but not tried it. I must try them again, as I made a few myself & Slinky Malinky also made some for me! :) They would work better on a 'hot bite' than just 'prospecting'!

Cheerio & good luck

ROberta

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Hello Roberta,

Yes, the ice was made by Tiewell.

The site I saw thefly on was: http://www.learntoflyfish.net/Fly_Weed.htm

Thanks for the link. I've had no experience tying flies at all so it's a bit hard getting my head around the tying instructions. I'll have to get experimenting.

Thanks for the help.

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great thread guys , ive been fishing for many years for blackies my old man use to take me along with him when i was a wee tacker back in the mid 80s and ive been hooked ever since im now 33 , we usually just hit the lakes during winter and if where lucky in summer too(bit hard to get good wire in summer though as the heat kills it off).i live on the central coast so my main fishing grounds for blackies are the entrance wall or north entrance channel those two places have been good to me over the years and have produced some great niggas .........also when i feel like a drive i head up to the hot water at lake munmorah power station although im a bit weary of eating any out of there.....anyway thought id poke my head in and say gday :thumbup:

ps:great info roberta , very interesting read

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Hi,

Lots of good advice here on finding fish.

When rock fishing, I reckon you should spend a bit of time studying the flow of water. Fish tend to hang where the food comes to them. A lot of the best food tends to live in the intertidal zone. Dry at low tide, this food becomes available at high tide when fish can either swim right up to it and graze, or, when the wave action washes over the food source dislodging some and carrying it to deeper water where the fish congregate and wait for it to turn up.

I've seen huge groper and drummer allow themselves to be washed over a rock platform in only a few inches of water to snaffle tucker as they pass.

Blackfish can be caught in high tide pools and gutters that are dry or cut off from the ocean at low tide.

Look for the wash that carries cabbage and weed etc off the platform, put your float in and let it drift. Sometimes the fish are in close, at other times they're out a ways. Play around with the depth (often deeper in clear water) and you'll find where they are.

Koalaboi

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top report Roberta, i will take plenty aboard from this:)

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Hi,

Tony's the name, and I first learn't to catch these beauties off the rocks at Little Bay as a 14 year old. The technique used there back then (late 70's and early 80's) that I'd like to share with you, and which was practiced and developed by the old masters, was to fish it very, very light (8lb main, 4lb trace).

Before the days of floating lines, it meant you didn't have to regularly grease up, allowing more time in the water to fish, the light rig also provided a better presentation, for better maneuverability in narrow channels, like "the gutter" and of course for the sheer sport of it! The technique also called for a short, extremely whippy rod of no more than 10 ft - typically 8' 6". All sorts of blanks were used, but by far the favourite was the Conlon.

This short bendy blank would provide light rigs with the extra cushioning needed when a larger fish, or even the occasional drummer was on. Yes, you can catch and land drummer on such light gear, so long as you kept its head up and let its strength play out on the very springy, short rods used.

Eggbeaters were never seen - nearly everyone fished an Avon or Steelite reel with the occasional wooden centrepin on duty.

The old guys also favoured very tiny bobby corks, fixed in place, instead of running stem floats - submerged just below the surface by split shot. Although this was difficult to get a handle on initially when casting, in the narrow channels of Little Bay, the fish would typically strike very quickly, so there was no mistaking a down when it occurred.

Below the float, as mentioned, small 0 and even 00 split shot was used for ballast, and at the terminal was a suicide pattern hook - size 10 or 12, again the emphasis on tiny. This allowed for a near natural presentation of a cabbage leaf bait, (secured by a half-hitch), which was the preferred favourite of both fisherman and fish - even bream during the wintertime, although whole rosettes were also sometimes used.

One downside to fishing so light was that sometimes you just didn't know what hit you as big square-mouth, or drummer would just bust you clean off almost as soon as you connected. However the rigs were quick to replace (no swivel) which meant more time in the water, more fun and as a consequence - more fish.

Even though I haven't fished the gutters at Little Bay in over 20 years, the technique taught to me there as a youngster I still apply in other areas till this day, when chasing Blackfish - except at Maroubra, (being home back then I also fished it, but never enjoyed it as much) which perversely required very heavy gear, because of its extreme roughness. Some fishos even sporting 14 foot rods, 10lb traces and number 2 ball sinkers for ballast on very long stemmed floats which rode well high in the water! An interesting thing about the fish caught at Maroubra was that they were typically a much lighter colour than for an average Blackfish, almost milky, because of the sandy bottom I guess.

Cheers

Edited by Homeside

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the blackys are going off at the entrance nsw central coast i cleaned up with 20 all legal thanx for that great advice

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Awesome :thumbup: .Awesome :thumbup: .Awesome :thumbup: .That has to be the best,most complete info I've ever read regarding blackfish.As far as what I know there ain't much,but here it is:When I was younger (too long ago) there were three old guys who fished east balmain in sydney daily for blackies and they ALWAYS caught fish,no matter what.My mate gathered the courage to ask them what bait they were using and he was promptly handed a half dozen grubs.We proceeded to the wharf and soon were catching yellowtail.As the old guys left for the day we asked them where we could buy some of the grubs .The elderly fellow turned and said that we should hang a piece of rotting flesh over a bucket of pollard(bran flour).We did so and (after getting a kicking about the smell :wife::ranting2: ) after 3 days we noticed movement in the bucket.It turned out that we were breeding maggots.They did the trick and soon my mates and I were into the blackies.What we werent told was that flies soon appear as the gents(maggots) matured,so after another kicking (:wife::ranting2:) we decided to give it up.I wonder if there's any old fish heads in the fridge at the moment.Might be time to bring out the old tricks as I don't think I've caught a blackie in 20 years

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sweet! found an alvey blackfish reel in my shed that i didnt know i had. It's maroon and sorta old... dunno why my dad ever got it.

What should i spool it with? Brad or just mono?

also is a 7ft spin stick enough for blackie fishing from the shore? (harbour rocks... not much in terms of dangerous waves usually as they're usually protected in bays etc). It's that or a 9ft/12ft beach rod which i don't mind using but are a little heavy. The spin stick could probably cast a light weight farther

Also, i am having a hard time finding where blackfish live. Are there any tell tale signs or is it worth trying wherever theres weed growing on the rocks? How far out should i cast.. beyond the clear water near the rocks? Does it matter as long as it is in the general area and i've burleyed up?

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Hi cwf

Go to your chosen spot at low tide - if you see spots where cabbage has been chewed down to the rock ..... there will be blackies around on high/rising & falling tide!!

As to whether you try braid or mono - you will have to work that one out yourself! Some prefer the stretch of mono - I, personally, prefer braid! But the system I fish is very shallow, & you don't have the luxury of counting to 5 before striking!

Re your rod - the main thing is that it is 'soft in the tip'! This is so it acts as a shock absorber as much as anything! If you use a stiffer rod, you could well be ripping the hook out of their mouth. You want to set it, not rip it out! Also, a 'bendy' rod allows for that 'last gasp getaway effort' that most blackies try as you bring them in to net!

Jarvis Walker have now put out a Rock Blackfish Rod (about 3.4m long & very flexible) for a very reasonable price ..... check it out!! You can use it along breakwalls as well, as you may well encounter drummer as well!

You don't actually have to cast very far, either! Most blackies are hanging in VERY CLOSE to the rocks/wash, no matter where you cast! The closer you get to the rocks/wall, the better chance of catching blackies/drummer!

You can only really burley near the turn of the tide, when the flow is slower ..... otherwise you will be sending the fish away from where you are standing! If they are there, they are most likely to take your offerings!

Get out there & give it a go! you might just enjoy it!!! :wacko:

cheerio

Roberta

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should be a good season quality fish everwhere in my local spots !(central coast)

Edited by jew chaser

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might sound strange but does any one use an iou(spelling) pole for black fishing?,freind gave me one years ago,ive never used it but looks like it could be alot of fun!

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Hi JC - is that one of those 15ft long things with no runners - just a set length of line on them? They used to be called Ned Kelly poles here in the old day - you just hook 'em & reef 'em out!) I actually do have one (it concertinas down to about 4ft+ & is about 15ft when extended. Haven't used it yet!! Found it in a junk shop for $10 & couldn't help myself!! Have you got a pic of it?

Cheers

Roberta

Pretty sure it would be an 'ayu' pole - the japanese use them to catch 'ayu' - but they are TINY fish - a blackie would eat them for breakfast!!

Edited by Roberta

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yer hi Roberta, pulled it out today its called a wonder pole (shakespear) 20ft, has like 6 pull out sections! sea were a little large today to get some weed , so give it a crack tomorrow and post results!! have 10ft 1wrap with old wood Alvy but just want to scare a few of the old timers for a bit of a laugh, plus it looks it will be alot of fun ! who knows it might catch on,,, phill

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hey guys very very new to blackfishing, wondering where you can buy those weed lures from or weed in sydney, I know you can collect it at lowtide etc, cheers

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good read

i should of read this last week

i would of caught more fish :1fishing1:

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Hello,

I usually fish in freshwater as the nearest salt is about 2 hours drive away from where I live in Healesville, Victoria. A recent trip to Inverloch on the coast saw me trying to interest stripey fish that I assumed were luderick. Only had squid,bread and artificial sandworms( the toadies liked them! ) I'd really like to have a go at serious blackfishing but am I too far south to really make it worthwhile? I think I'm fine for rods and reels-various coarse fishing rods as well as nice old Black Queen rods and centrepin reels-Steelites, Grice and Young, Alvey 475B and an unmarked Russian reel that is really smooth running. Also have a set of blackfish floats, had to buy them as they're OZ made. I've really enjoyed reading the Blackie Fishing Forum and would appreciate any advice and help in getting started.

Cheers,

Steve

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Hi Steve

:1welcomeani: :1welcomeani: to Fishraider!!! Sorry for the late reply!! I think your post must have arrived whilst the Forster Fishing Carnival was on & I was into full-on fishing mode :1prop: ..... I won the biggest blackfish from kayak category ..... and my fish was bigger than the 'open' section by 100g as well!! :biggrin2:

The most important thing when setting up your float gear, is to make sure that you are using the correct lines. The Main line needs to be stronger than the sinker line & both these need to be stronger than the leader/hook line!! This way, you should only ever be busted off at the leader & not lose your float & weight setup.

Chances are, if those fish have never really been targetted, you may well catch some stonkers!! Make sure you have a long handled net with which to land them - don't try & use the rod to lift them out of the water. They fight hard & they fight dirty! If there is weed or rocks around, they will try & head for it immediately, to bust you off. Allow the rod to act as a shock absorber (it needs to be a 'bendy' rod to achieve this.) I use a black queen myself, in my yak! :thumbup: The longer rods would be more suited for lakeside or breakwalls.

Just read the initial post a few times & make note of the more important tips ........ie correct weight on the float, so that every touch is clearly seen, adjusting the depth of the float up & down, if not getting bites & PATIENCE! Patience is probably the biggest tip! Berley up with chopped up cabbage/weed in some damp sand (only towards the top & turn of the tide, or else it will get swept away.) This can keep the fish feeding in your zone without having to move, to chase them. Tennis ball sized berley would be good.

Apart from that ..... good luck - and let me know if you catch any!! Take your camera & post some pics if you do. Remember to kill them & bleed them & remove the black lining of the stomach if intending to keep them for a feed. They smoke beautifully, too, or filleted & skinned, covered with flour or breadcrumbs & pan fried, yummy, too!

Cheers

Roberta

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Hi Steve

:1welcomeani: :1welcomeani: to Fishraider!!! Sorry for the late reply!! I think your post must have arrived whilst the Forster Fishing Carnival was on & I was into full-on fishing mode :1prop: ..... I won the biggest blackfish from kayak category ..... and my fish was bigger than the 'open' section by 100g as well!! :biggrin2:

The most important thing when setting up your float gear, is to make sure that you are using the correct lines. The Main line needs to be stronger than the sinker line & both these need to be stronger than the leader/hook line!! This way, you should only ever be busted off at the leader & not lose your float & weight setup.

Chances are, if those fish have never really been targetted, you may well catch some stonkers!! Make sure you have a long handled net with which to land them - don't try & use the rod to lift them out of the water. They fight hard & they fight dirty! If there is weed or rocks around, they will try & head for it immediately, to bust you off. Allow the rod to act as a shock absorber (it needs to be a 'bendy' rod to achieve this.) I use a black queen myself, in my yak! :thumbup: The longer rods would be more suited for lakeside or breakwalls.

Just read the initial post a few times & make note of the more important tips ........ie correct weight on the float, so that every touch is clearly seen, adjusting the depth of the float up & down, if not getting bites & PATIENCE! Patience is probably the biggest tip! Berley up with chopped up cabbage/weed in some damp sand (only towards the top & turn of the tide, or else it will get swept away.) This can keep the fish feeding in your zone without having to move, to chase them. Tennis ball sized berley would be good.

Apart from that ..... good luck - and let me know if you catch any!! Take your camera & post some pics if you do. Remember to kill them & bleed them & remove the black lining of the stomach if intending to keep them for a feed. They smoke beautifully, too, or filleted & skinned, covered with flour or breadcrumbs & pan fried, yummy, too!

Cheers

Roberta

Congratulations on winning the largest kayak caught blackfish in the Forster comp Roberta :thumbup: It's great to see that our favourite little lady hasn't lost her touch :thumbup: A big hello to Keith for me ay

Cheers

jewgaffer :1fishing1:

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THanks Jewgaffer - good to see you on the computer again - hope you are travelling OK, this getting old isn't what it's cracked up to be! :wacko:

Keith is going great guns, thank you - he flies out to the US on the weekend to visit his older brother in Florida. That means ...... more fishing for me!! :biggrin2:

Cheerio for now - say Hi to to Shirl for us too

Roberta

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Hi Roberta,

Thanks for the welcome to Fishraider. This forum on blackie fishing contains a wealth of information for anyone just getting started. I'm looking forward to giving the luderick a serious go. I've pretty well got all the tackle and gear, I just need to locate some weed or find a spot with cabbage weed.

Congratulations for doing so well in that recent fishing competition and with a blackfish too.Bonus!

Regards,

Steve.

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