david

Inflatable Life Jackets

47 posts in this topic

Does anyone know wether a bumbag type inflatable life jacket meets waterways requirement while around your waste in the bag and not inflated around your neck.

Yes it does, the bumbag I perchased was quite old, so carry your recept if you decide to use one.

"Do the “bum bag” style lifejackets meet legislative requirements?

The new bum bag style lifejackets meet the legislative requirements provided the waistband buckle is properly secured and provided they are marked by the manufacturer as meeting the relevant standard acceptable to NSW Maritime."

http://www.maritime.nsw.gov.au/wh/lifejacket_reforms_faqs.html

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<br />

im trying to find a deal on one of these manual inflatable ones myself .<br />

<br /><br /><br />

Hey dinos22, contact Huey from Huett marine (site sponsor). I know he had a deal going not long ago on these life jackets but cant remember if they were manual or auto inflatable. Maybe send him a PM.

Cheers

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Yes it does, the bumbag I perchased was quite old, so carry your recept if you decide to use one.

"Do the “bum bag” style lifejackets meet legislative requirements?

The new bum bag style lifejackets meet the legislative requirements provided the waistband buckle is properly secured and provided they are marked by the manufacturer as meeting the relevant standard acceptable to NSW Maritime."

http://www.maritime.nsw.gov.au/wh/lifejacket_reforms_faqs.html

Thanks .

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are these PFD's any good?

https://pfdsales.com.au/?gclid=CJnvsOvbnacCFQSYpAod0nCrgA

i like the idea of a full lighweight jacket that cuts the wind / spray, and also doesnt look like a PFD

they are expensive though - any alternatives?

Thanks for the link, ive been looking for jackets like that for a while.. the 149 buck ones look ok.. expensive yes but also very practical .

As far as the full spray jacket type goes.. is it worth paying that much for something u will only use in winter?

Edited by Macnaz

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I bought the bottle kits and serviced mine myself (its not rocket science!),,, i dont what the 'law' is and im sure the Maritime service wouldnt know either,

as there are many different circumstances(yeah service them once a year),,

, the government makes the rules but never actually clarifies exactly what is required,

Im a mechanic by trade,,, does that give me the right to service this device???

or somebody with a lesser qualification that is an "authorised agent"???

I know my life jackets were serviced correctly.....

Anthony

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I know this is for inflatable life jackets but I don't like starting new threads if it's not required.

I don't want an inflatable one as I don't want the servicing cost or hassle, 12 months comes around very quickly.

Atm, I have the standard cheese blocks and have only worn them when crossing a bar.

Where can I find the most comfortable jacket that doesn't require inflation?

Edited by Alfa-Rosa

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a quick search on the internet for the make and model of the inflatable and you shoud be able to get the self service information and documentation. if it looks too dificult, take it to an agent. If you self service, and it fails, get it fixed or replaced, do not cheat.

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I know this is for inflatable life jackets but I don't like starting new threads if it's not required.

I don't want an inflatable one as I don't want the servicing cost or hassle, 12 months comes around very quickly.

Atm, I have the standard cheese blocks and have only worn them when crossing a bar.

Where can I find the most comfortable jacket that doesn't require inflation?

What's comfortable is a very relative or personal thing. Your size, body type, flexibility and other clothing to be worn with it are all factors so nothing beats trying each brand for fit and comfort. I found the big boating chains to have the least range of brands and types available, obviously they bulk purchase from one supplier, so I would look around the good independent stores and even some of the department stores.

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Hi.

I've got a coupla Stormy seas inflatable jackets. Ocean rated. from my Offshore sailing days.

Designed for pro fishermen. Had ém for yrs. service. basically. is manual inflate with mouthpiece every 12 months. Submerge to check for leaks. then leave up for 48hrs to see if they go soft.

With the Stormy's there is a coloured little tab you replace and a label where you print date of service.

With the 24\30gram cylinders. As long as there's no corrosion and they weigh the correct weight.. They good for around 6 yrs.

So I'm told from Q'Lqng Dep't of fisheries. Just a new tab in there. and dated.

Otherwise swap it out. (Around $33 each.) I get mine posted straight from Tassie.

Normal life jackets are in boat too. But only mainly as cushions. and if coast guard get picky on inflatables.

I wear my jacket most of time. Always at night.and as soon as they see the Stormy jackets they normally say OK..

They are concidered the best. and safest on market..

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I have a Bourke auto inflate unit that has had heavy rain and seaspray on it. After three years, I bought a service kit that included a new auto-inflate valve and gas bottle. Tried it in actually submerging it and it went off fine.

There is a manual inflate pull tag on it too. And blow up tube as well as whistle.

Don't forget, ALL PFDs in Vic need a whistle now aparently, so buy your plastic whistle when next in you local supplier.

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One of my auto inflatable PFDs self inflated while I was cleaning the boat yesterday. The auto inflate valve was due for replacement anyway so I wore another one. I had it in the forward storage area and really gave the carpet a thorough wash down. I opened the hatch while hosing and the water must have gushed directly from the carpet onto the valve! It burst the storage bag! Getting a new valve AND a bag! lol

Baz

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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One of my auto inflatable PFDs self inflated while I was cleaning the boat yesterday. The auto inflate valve was due for replacement anyway so I wore another one. I had it in the forward storage area and really gave the carpet a thorough wash down. I opened the hatch while hosing and the water must have gushed directly from the carpet onto the valve! It burst the storage bag! Getting a new valve AND a bag! lol

Baz

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Actually, two jackets self inflated! For the Axis, i contacted the distributor via the website and they sent a new bag, cylinder and auto inflator valve for $22, GST and postage included. Not bad at all! :)

The other one's a Burke, so I'll have to chase down a valve for that, too.

Baz

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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There are good quality multi fit or one size fits all life jackets around from colourful pd 3's to pd 1's for bays and open waters etc that will fit every member of the family....

To fit every member of your family perhaps but there are two of my family members who don't fit into XXXL PFDs.

A while back both were using imported US sourced 5-6XL PFDs until a water police officer told them that their vests were not approved under an Australian standard (which they weren't they had US Coast Guard standard markings on them) and further that even after they explained that they couldn't buy a non inflatable PFD to fit with Australian standards markings they were in breach of the regulations and that they could fine them (and would if they found them wearing them again).

So now they wear inflatable vests because those are the only ones with long enough straps to actually fit them *shrug*.

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HI Raiders,

I've got a couple of manual inflatable PFD's that are due for service, does anyone know of an authorised dealer somewhere not too far from Ryde (or Parramatta so I can drop them off from work)?

Or does each brand of PFD have their own agents?

Cheers,

Linc

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You can service manually operated pfd's yourself. You need to open up the pfd on both sides and check that the stitching and seams are intact. Most have a light and whistle which need to be operable. The cartridge contains CO2 gas and should be weighed on (accurate) kitchen scales. There is a weight stamped on the CO2 cylinder...mine is 33grams. Provided the weight of the cartridge is correct it is ok to reinstall it and carefully put the yellow inflatable bits back inside. Close up the Velcro all around, ensuring that the pull cord hangs freely out of the bottom. You can keep a 'service log" in a suitable place in your boat /yak or I have written the service date in black texta inside my pfd's, prior to closing them up again. There is also a valve /nozzle which you can use to manually inflate the pfd, to check for leaks in the bladder. The original question as to how much they should cost...$70 seems to be the lowest price around. It's certainly not value for money to send them away to be checked when you can often get a new one for a similar cost. There is an Australian Standard which relates to the maintenance of pfd's which I am going to check, to see if I missed anything. Will advise, Big Neil.

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Ok so

You can service manually operated pfd's yourself. You need to open up the pfd on both sides and check that the stitching and seams are intact. Most have a light and whistle which need to be operable. The cartridge contains CO2 gas and should be weighed on (accurate) kitchen scales. There is a weight stamped on the CO2 cylinder...mine is 33grams. Provided the weight of the cartridge is correct it is ok to reinstall it and carefully put the yellow inflatable bits back inside. Close up the Velcro all around, ensuring that the pull cord hangs freely out of the bottom. You can keep a 'service log" in a suitable place in your boat /yak or I have written the service date in black texta inside my pfd's, prior to closing them up again. There is also a valve /nozzle which you can use to manually inflate the pfd, to check for leaks in the bladder. The original question as to how much they should cost...$70 seems to be the lowest price around. It's certainly not value for money to send them away to be checked when you can often get a new one for a similar cost. There is an Australian Standard which relates to the maintenance of pfd's which I am going to check, to see if I missed anything. Will advise, Big Neil.

I have checked and it appears that there is no Australian Standard and that different States apply different regulations. My pfd's are ULTRA brand and I sourced information from ultrapfd.com.au Hope this is helpful. Big Neil

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Thanks Neil, It is OK to self service in NSw if you know what you are doing, but you do need some spare parts with you as there is one little connection that breaks when you dismantle CO2 cartridge. I'm not overly confident as I've never looked into the inner workings of a PFD before so thinking to go to an agent, any life is worth a good $25 surely :)

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Raiders,

I recently had the necessity of activating my manual inflatable in an emergency, and discovered something not in the instructions:

when you test your lifejacket (by blowing into the red tube to inflate it), put the life-jacket on, blow it up, and adjust the waist strap so that it is snug, but not killer-tight.

I had my waist strap on fairly tight (and I am skinny, and was wearing only a t-shirt at the time). When I needed to pull the rip cord, the inflation was VERY RAPID!

This sudden inflation really over-tightened the waist-strap and also meant that the life-jacket itself blasted into my chest. This was a pretty unpleasant sensation as I'd just broken some ribs.

So better to set the waist-strap so it is snug, not holding you in a death-grip.

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I replace the cylinders in my (4) jackets every year, no parts are required and I smear a little vaso (over the shell not on the nozzle) as they can rust very quickly.

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