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Holls

Saddleback Syndrome? (Lordosis)

Question

Hope I have the right section: Over the last year or so, I've been catching bream in Burrill Lake with what has been ID'd as Saddleback Syndrome. I thought it was a Queensland issue, but seems to have crept south. Anybody know anything about this? (Photo is of a fish that was frozen, but you can clearly see the deformity in the dorsal fin.) Thanks.

saddleback.jpg

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Ok, Ive asked the boffins down in the lab and they say

Quote "Its called "Lordosis" and basically a forward (Downward in fish) curvature of the spine. Morwong, Drummer, bream etc have all been caught in this condition.The spline and Ptergiophores (Bones at the base of the dorsal fin) are intact and fully formed"

I had to ask as I'm not that clever but did know in most cases not a injury.

Thanks Boffins.:)

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I read a report on this quite some time back which stated it was some kind of disease that caused the problem, not nets.

 

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23 hours ago, seasponge said:

Caught quite a few in the Hawkesbury like that. Heard the net story before, but don't know if that's true or not.

 

Net story has been disproved, and it's not from another fish bite. It's a deformity from something in the water - but they're not sure what (heavy metals, pollution, run-off??). You can eat the fish tho. But I've never heard of the syndrome being so far south of Sydney??  Anyone caught one in other waters down this way?

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I have been told its an injury from a net, where they have escaped.

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i have caught a bream like that 

thought it was from another fish

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Caught quite a few in the Hawkesbury like that. Heard the net story before, but don't know if that's true or not.

 

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Posted (edited)

21 hours ago, Holls said:

Net story has been disproved, and it's not from another fish bite. It's a deformity from something in the water - but they're not sure what (heavy metals, pollution, run-off??). You can eat the fish tho. But I've never heard of the syndrome being so far south of Sydney??  Anyone caught one in other waters down this way?

I had to dig to find this pic (and be sure I wasn't fabricating memories). Smiths Creek, Hawkesbury, September 2016.

 

footnote:
In my ignorance, I imagined something must have bitten a chunk out of it's back and that it'd somehow survived. Now I know.

I've learned lots of good and interesting stuff from Fishriader - thanks Holls!

P9290303.jpg

Edited by HenryR
.. it's Smiths Creek, not Smith Creek ...

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21 hours ago, HenryR said:

I had to dig to find this pic (and be sure I wasn't fabricating memories). Smiths Creek, Hawkesbury, September 2016.

 

footnote:
In my ignorance, I imagined something must have bitten a chunk out of it's back and that it'd somehow survived. Now I know.

I've learned lots of good and interesting stuff from Fishriader - thanks Holls!

P9290303.jpg

Yes, snapper are known to be affected as well. Apparently snapper breed at sea but close to the shore, and their spawn, drifting with the currents can end up in estuaries and lakes where the juveniles stay. I've caught some legal sized snapper in Burrill Lake. (Here's a pic)

Snapper.jpg

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On 6/15/2017 at 4:59 PM, Holls said:

Net story has been disproved, and it's not from another fish bite. It's a deformity from something in the water - but they're not sure what (heavy metals, pollution, run-off??). You can eat the fish tho. But I've never heard of the syndrome being so far south of Sydney??  Anyone caught one in other waters down this way?

i am going with holls

i personally dont think it has been bitten by another fish or the net story

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I have caught a few like that over the years n i thought they were old healed live bait hook injuries. 

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19398152_1837608793226407_237613443_n.jpg?oh=fb98daaeaaa99d9af2184e9e34f0df67&oe=594C63FC

Caught a bream with this syndrome tonight at Warilla beach thought it was nets or from another fish.

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Posted (edited)

Holls, the way to check it out is to carefully fillet the fish to find out if the backbone is deformed.

Bream and especially smaller reddies will by attacked by larger fish. Larger tailor will attack smaller reddies, as I have had quite a number with bite marks out of them, especially the tail section. Have caught a few tailor that have attacked small reddies I have hooked, or pulled up the reddies with a tailor chewing on the reddie's rear end.

Large flatties will attack bream.

Edited by Yowie

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Interesting condition, this Lordosis. I'll have to read up on it. I wonder why the dorsal fin disappears over the affected area? I'll come back here with an answer if I find out.

 

Cheers,

Nursie

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Found this on the cause of Lordosis

Vertebral anomalies have been found in various kinds of fish stocks and wild populations. Vertebral deformities like scoliosis (abnormal lateral curvature), lordosis (excessive inward curvature), kyphosis (excessive outward curvature) and ankylosis (abnormal stiffening and immobility of joint due to fusion of bones), though rare, but have been recorded for many species of teleosts. The causes of these have been ascribed to hazardous effects of environmental contamination, scarcity of nutrients, oxygen deficiency, sudden changes in temperature, water current, mutation, inbreeding, parasitic infestation and mechanic trauma, attack from predators etc.

 

I think the actual  cause is they just don't know

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Posted (edited)

As I said earlier, the fish needs to be filleted to determine if there is any deformity in the bone structure, or if the dorsal bones have been chewed off. The best way to tell.

I caught a few tailor many years ago with what appeared to be a deformity of the backbone, and when filleted, the backbone was actually deformed and curved a bit.

Bream with those bits missing along the dorsal fins, when filleted actually had the dorsal fins chewed off (obviously from a bite from a larger fish) and the backbone appeared perfect. Have only caught a few bream with a missing section of dorsal fin, and do not remember ever finding the backbone to be deformed.

No doubt some fish have imperfections in the bone structure, like humans, caused by other factors apart from mechanical injury (eg. collision with a boat), or bites from bigger fish. Fish swim in polluted waters at times, and there is no escaping toxic water when it spills into the ocean and rivers.

I can speak with some experience, as I have caught and filleted fish for something approaching 60 years.

Edited by Yowie

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