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  1. Finally, after countless hours, unimaginable numbers of squid caught and almost a year of fishing I finally caught a kingfish, bonus it was a big Sydney king going 88cm. So stoked to get this guy, taken on a live cuttlefish. It was pulling drag on a almost locked drag 5500 reel so I knew it was a good fish from the moment I hooked onto it. The early mornings and late squidding sessions all finally paid off and I’m so happy that the first one I caught was a stonker of a fish. So happy to get my first one in middle harbour where I’ve been trying to get one since day dot.
    37 points
  2. G’day raiders, I’ve been pretty quiet lately just sorting a few things out and with the restrictions means Broughton is off limits. There’s plenty of areas still to fish but the ocean going spots south are not productive this time of year. So today, me and the eldest thought we’d go back to basics and chase a few flatties in the bay. We really struggled to find them on the run up tide and the wind didn’t help our drifts either. So the call was made to change areas and fish the back half of the bay. We were targeting a good area with some nice drop offs as the tide turned but still couldn’t find any takers. Two drifts for zero but I knew the area had fish. So we pushed in a bit closer to shore and first cast the boy was on. Then again but a decent one. Then again and my day was looking bleak. Next drift however was my turn and I loaded up to a ripper that wanted my lure and swallowed it completely. Then I managed another couple and the score was 3 all. We did one more drift as the tide was now receding quickly but unfortunately no more takers and we called it a day! Always fun to get out on the water with your kids. Home by 1pm and a couple of fish cooked and eaten, with a big smile on our faces! Can’t ask for more than that! Thanks for reading, cheers scratchie!!!
    24 points
  3. Blackwattle Bay has been fishing well since the water started warming up. No doubt due in part to the fact that the works on Johnson's Creek canal have finished and the creek is once again open to the tide. Always been a good spot to hit on the runout tide and it's been known to attract a pelagic or two. This was my mission this morning - early morning middle of the runout. Signs weren't promising when I arrived just before sunrise - one lone seagull. No wind. Not a lot of outflow evident from the creek like I was hoping. Ah well, I've caught fish in worse conditions. I left the 95mm Splash Prawn on that I'd been throwing at Rose Bay the day before. Cast around for a bit to no avail. Was just about to change lures when a larger group of seagulls arrived. A pelican had started making this way slowly from the opposite end of the bay. Decided a few more casts wouldn't hurt. Next cast I was working the lure slowly after a good size cast - the lure was probably 30-40m from me when the water underneath it erupted in a trademark fashion that I took for a good size tailor. Finally some action - welcome but not the target species so I wasn't too excited even though it took a little bit of drag. I was thinking about how I was gonna get the hooks out with him thrashing about as tailor like to do. It was pretty weighty actually. As it got closer I still hadn't seen any silver as I was expecting and it wasn't until it got to my feet that I saw it was an XL flathead. Its head was huge. That was only half the battle. I tested her weight and immediately ruled out lifting her. The tide was getting pretty low - probably 20cm at my feet. The only viable spot was a set of stairs 100m down the path. Didn't have much choice and I knew I had a solid hookset and quality hardware so I walked her all the way and slid her onto the bottom step with my heart about to jump out of my throat. Had a quick measure and a photo before I popped her back. She swam off like a champ in spite of the ordeal. Not quite a PB flatty at 77cm but definitely a PB topwater flatty and my second ever. First fish I've had on the 95mm Splash Prawn as well. Another thing, that Splash Prawn is a great lure - comes in at nearly 30 bucks but the hardware on it is solid as. I dragged that fish all that way and the hooks were like new after. Very impressed - makes me confident I can put some hurt on a king without pulling hooks. Tight lines everyone 🤙
    22 points
  4. 10 Weeks Into A New Hobby 10 weeks ago I started fishing. First, with a hand line and a basic travel rod on the second day. A few small fish were hooked up, but the highlight of the day was meeting @DerekDand @Wes. Derek's enthusiasm for fishing is clear and he has generously shared his wealth of knowledge and abundance of experience with myself over the last 10 weeks. I've learnt what can only be described as an insane amount, and am very fortunate that I've been able to pick all this up during lockdown and have a lot of great fishing spots within 5km from home. I've made a point to explore and found over 30 places to go, and have enjoyed being out in nature. Over these 10 weeks, I've gone from knowing nothing to landing squid, flathead and a kingfish! Hopefully this will serve as inspiration or some useful information to the next person starting out. The Basics I generally have an analytical approach to things, which resonated well with Derek's philosophy - if he couldn't answer any of my questions then he needs to go find the answer. I've made sure to practice managing my tackle and knots, as getting the basics right makes you more efficient and means you can spend more time chasing fish. At the same time, I've made sure to roll my sleeves up and learn by doing - I'm not going to catch anything if the rod is in the car, and every time I go out I can learn something - even if I don't catch fish, I'll still be trying to improve my casting or knots. I've also found it's important to have a specific plan, for example: I want a fish to eat, so I'm going to try and catch a flathead. Flathead are bottom feeders and might be found on sand flats, so I need to work my lure across the bottom in these areas to have a good chance of catching one. Lures are effective for targeting specific fish, but you need the right approach and setup to match it. Rod & Reel We spoke about a few different types of rod and reels, but Derek recommended my first rod is the Atomic Arrowz AAS-270UL 3-14g 2-4kg 7'0" 2 piece with a Shimano Sedona 2500, running 4lb braid and 8lb mono leader. I absolutely love the setup, and get excellent casting distance and accuracy. The rod feels incredibly versatile. The 4lb braid actually has a much higher breaking strength than advertised, but this varies by brand. Knots I use the FG Knot to tie the braid to mono. To get up to speed quickly, I spent hours with the TV on practicing the knot. It's really worth spending time practicing in easy conditions - it suddenly gets a lot harder when you're out in the wind with cold hands. I also used the knots to lift a dumbbell off the floor to test their strength. It's surprising how much weight a small line can take. I've been using the uni knot to tie lures onto the mono without issue. Carefully doing the knot minimises line wastage, so I have to re-tie the FG / leader less frequently. Lures We primarily started out with Soft Plastic Lures - Berkley Power Bait 3 inch minnows and grubs. Alongside this, I got some metal lures: the Halco Twisty and Ecogear ZX40, a range of Yamashita squid jigs, and more recently some hard body lures. Casting Achieving both distance and accuracy is important when you're fishing off land. You've got limited places you can stand unless you know how to walk on water, and a 10% increase in cast distance means you actually cover 20% more ground, because the area is circular (radius squared). I've also learnt to cast from different positions: forehand, backhand and over my left shoulder. This lets me counteract the wind with a different casting trajectory or work around obstacles wherever I'm fishing from. It's also become natural and efficient to cast this way, so I don't physically tire or strain myself. Retrieves Derek has shown me several retrieves to get the best action out of the plastics. Whilst you can just run the plastics back, making the minnows twitch and dart like a scared baitfish grabs the attention of predators and both forces the fish to act and gives them the opportunity to do so. Fishing Spots We've also spent a lot of time talking about fishing spots - how you deal with the wind and make it work in your favour, what makes an area good or bad at different tides, and how to look out for structure, how deep weeds grow, and so on. Blackfish - Week 1 On the first day I met Derek, it was my first day of using a rod, and I was sending bait out without much luck. Derek and Wes had come out to catch Blackfish using weed with a float. Derek was happy to share what they were up to, and he'd just begun teaching Wes recently. He made light work of taking a blackfish out the water. It was clear that having an effective plan was crucial: right place, right time, right bait. Then it was Wes's turn to land a fish. Under Derek's instruction, another fish came out of the water not long after. Wes kindly lent me his rod, and I got to have a go. Despite my inexperience, some basic tips from Derek (keep it away from the structure!) helped me land a fish too. Australian Salmon - Week 2 At the end of the second week of my fishing, Derek hooked up an Australian Salmon on a 3 inch minnow and kindly handed me the rod to see if I could land it. This absolutely hooked me. It was a lot of fun to bring it in, and by the time we got it in the fish was exhausted. It's important to me to treat fish we're not keeping correctly, and we promptly released the fish rather than taking a photo. Catching Squid - Week 3 & 4 I had my mind on some recipes involving squid (more on that in a future post), so decided I'd go hunting for them. Armed with some Yamashita Squid Jigs, I set out to catch some squid. The general premise is to let the jig sink down, then twitch in back up through the water column. The squid come in and grab it, and I understand they have excellent eyesight and so prey in lower light conditions (e.g. dawn/dusk) and are fast swimmers. They also tend to travel in groups, so other squid might follow yours up, and if you're fishing in a group it's worth working together. The Yamashita squid jigs have different sink rates (which is not just their size). Density determines sink rate, and my first jig was size 2.2 with 8-9s per m sink, which takes a while if you want it to drop down 5m. There were several failed attempts going after squid - once in a strong wind where it was impossible to get a good cast in, and following a storm there was no activity (dirty water?). However, practice makes perfect. After persisting, I landed my first squid (and my first solo catch). The squid was promptly killed and prepared for lunch as calamari with chips and salad. Thankfully Derek advised me on how not to get inked, simply by ensuring the jet isn't coming towards you before softly laying the squid down. I now also have a size 2.5 jig with 4-5s per m sink rate. I strongly prefer this, as it lets me cover a lot more ground. Not only does it cast further, but the faster sink means I can work through the area better. The advantage of the slower sink rate is that it makes it easier to avoid snags if there are weeds present. I've also got a blacklight, but tend to only use it when it's darker. You can expect a future post about my squid ink risotto: Flathead for Dinner - Week 5 After landing and preparing squid, I decided I wanted to chase Flathead - which is a great eating fish and abundant in Sydney harbour. Flathead is a bottom feeder, and I targeted it using the soft plastic grubs. By running it along the bottom with twitching and darting motions then pauses, the grub becomes an easy and attractive meal. During this week, I fished a bit in Middle Harbour. I hooked and dropped a well sized flathead much to my dismay, when I was trying to figure out how to land it, and then landed a smaller flathead a couple of days later, which I returned to the water. And the end of the week, I got a legal sized flathead with returned home and got filleted. This went into a pasta dish which was delicious. Kingfish - Week 6 On the Monday of Week 6, Derek asked if I wanted to join him for an afternoon fish. It was low tide, and we went up to middle harbour and out on some rocks. Derek was aiming for some blackfish with his Fly Rod, and showing the rod to me in more detail, while I was using the Berkley Powerbait 3 inch minnows and working the water column. We noticed a splash about 15-20m offshore, and I cast in that direction and quickly worked the minnow back, making it dart with pauses. This is approach Derek used to hook the Salmon he handed me. On my second cast, the fish went for the minnow and was locked on. The first couple of runs were strong, and Derek made sure I didn't try and rush the fish back in. At this stage, we didn't know what it was, but it was taking off a decent amount of line. Although there was some structure in the area, there was enough room to let it run. I made sure to lock the butt of the rod against my forearm, so I could fight the fish efficiently. If the fish was rushed in, it'd be very hard to control near the rocks, and we knew we'd loose it on the line. After the first 3 strong runs, Derek suspected it was a king. You can feel the fish swimming along, and then almost pausing and "lining up" before it runs. Kings will try and scrape the line off against structure, or wrap the line around structure, which is why I needed to let it run and tire out in the open space. The fight kept going, and after 6 runs my arm was burning and I was putting a good amount of effort in. I kept working the fish back. The 7th run felt tired, and was a lot shorter, but I didn't rush it, and as the fish got closer, it made a last ditch 8th run which was flat out, and significantly more aggressive, and then it was done. Derek got a landing net from the car whilst I kept the fish swimming in small circles, but not letting it recover, and I then swam the king into the net and landed it. I took the king out for a photo, and it's about 55cm long. I then stepped into the water, and swam the fish, before holding it by the tail, when it then gave a kick and was released off. I felt sick to the stomach from the adrenaline, and my boots were soaked through, and I won't forget it any time soon. All in, it took about 15 minutes to land the fish (and all on a light rod and line). Catching the king was the culmination of everything I'd learned - my casting range and accuracy, the retrieve of the minnow, the line and knots holding, fighting the fish patiently like the Salmon, then safely landing the fish, handling it and returning it to the water. The next morning I woke up and my first though was... when's the next one? 2nd Rod and Hardbody Lures - Week 6 & 7 Over the next couple of weeks, we started practicing casting with my 2nd rod. The Shimano Raider 762 15-45g 5-8kg 7'6" 2 piece. Derek has kindly lent me a Shimano Sedona for practice, but I'm planning to get a Shimano Stradic 4000 on the weekend, with braid + mono leader. This rod feels like an absolute weapon, but has given me incredible casting range. We also got started with hardbody lures - the Bassday Sugapen, the MMD Splash Prawn and OSP Bent Minnow. Each lure can be retrieved in a slightly different way to get the best action, and even though we were limited in the areas I could practice, I did land a tailor with the bent minnow. It can be retrieved to swim just below the surface and then float up like a dead baitfish, making it an easy target. Bigger Flathead - Week 8 Having got better with my casting, retrieves and general confidence, Derek and I were having a casual fishing session with a nice view of the bridge and the opera house, and I pulled a 48cm flatty out of the water. This was caught on the Berkley 3inch minnow, covering ground and running it along the bottom. I returned this to the water, but was able to directly lift it out on the lightweight setup without undue strain on the rod. The One That Got Away - Week 9 I hooked up a Silver Trevally, and got it under control and ready to lift out, then... dropped it and lost it. I was rushing because a storm was rolling in, and I didn't want to wait around, but lesson learned! Alongside this, I've been refining my casting and knots further, and practicing more with hardbodies. Kingfish in the Summer - Week 10 With Summer round the corner, I've been learning techniques for chasing Kings using freshly caught squid bait, and how we can prepare the squid to use strips or the head, how we cast that out and work it back, and the usage of floats etc for setting the bait at a desired height. Hopefully as the water warms up, we'll get some bigger kings moving in. Now that the travel restrictions have eased, I'm also going yabby/nipper pumping this weekend outside of Sydney Harbour, as another source of fresh bait to use. Whilst I enjoy plastics and they're clearly effective, it's useful to have different tools depending on my objective, and how much time I have. Plastics are very low maintenance, and can just be left in the car with my other fishing gear ready to go whenever I feel like it.
    22 points
  5. g'day, before I start I did post this report in greater detail in my "quest for the mighty mulloway" thread, where I go through my plan and where I'm targeting, if me posting this report here as well isn't allowed, I apologize. Alrighty, a pretty action packed trip last night! Got out a bit later then I would've liked and paddling over to where I was fishing took a little bit longer then expected. Arrived at around 8.15pm and sounded out the bottom and decided to anchor on a river bend on the edge of a drop off which drops from 2.5 down to 6-7 meters not to far from Alfred's point bridge First rod - a whole pille/ mullet strips with a heaver sinker second rod - whole fresh squid, set up with a small sinker and I would open the bail arm every 5 mins to let it drift with current both rods had 14 pound leader/ 20lb braid to begin with Had a third rod to try and catch some of mullet or tailor which came close to my burly bag, while putting bread on the hook my rod with squid over and take a few meters of moderately tight drag, i grab the rod and as soon as tension was applied the line cut - bullshark Upgraded leader to 20lb and threw out another whole squid also replaced the pilchard with a fresh mullet strip 9.40pm rolls around and I put my second jacket on, as I sit back down my rod with squid buckle's and the drag is flying off, this run easily took 75meters of line and I'm thinking of when is it going to cut me off, then the famous run ends, and dead weight until under the kayak where I loosen the drag and I also finally feel those big thumping headshakes and it makes a few small runs. I tangle with my other line somehow but the fish is on the surface, a few attempts netting it. finally goes in, my god, its big. Colossal tangles in the net and a large jew taking up the entire deck of the kayak, I sat there looking at it in awe, spent a stupid amount of time cutting lines, untangling the net and struggling the even lift the slimy basted off the deck never alone release it without flipping the kayak, I knew it was too late, the fish would release poorly so I made the decision to put it out of its misery and eat my first ever jew. I'm a catch and release guy, but if I do get a feed I like to keep the slightly above legal models and leave the big ones for someone else to catch, my only regret of the night is not trying to release it and not taking so long just looking at the fish, trying to measure it and also untangling the net. The fish was 104cm, stoked to have cracked the meter. took it over to Georges river national park where I fillet the fish, some for me and some for the neighbour and gave the other half of the fish to a group of boys fishing for jews along the shoreline there. Forgot the fish had a tag, hopefully they see it and know what to do with it, as it was still in the fish. Here's the picture and its final measurement 104cm, caught 9:55pm on a whole fresh squid just after the change of the tide which was at 9:05pm, Georges river, near Alfred's point bridge.
    22 points
  6. G’day raiders, Just a quick report about yesterday because I’m away atm with limited service. Headed out with @back cruncher yesterday early trying to beat the weather but we weren’t successful doing that. Slow trip to the island and back. Hardest part after not fishing the island for the longest hiatus was which spot to start. Mick and I both concluded that who cares at least we can get up there. We both suggested the same name and that was it. Got to our spot and Mick comes up right second cast to a good snapper. My first cast a solid pike lol 😝. Micks on again and I follow suit with a decent one. Continue our drift pretty happy with the results so far. And then I managed to stay connected to a monster. I was hoping a new PB but wasn’t to be coming in at 90 but probably around the 10kg mark. Decided to release the fish and we were rewarded in our subsequent drifts with a few more for the table. Cracking day on the water and headed slowly back home in a ripping South Westerly pretty happy with ourselves! Thanks for reading, cheers scratchie!!!
    19 points
  7. It’s been long time between sessions, only really getting out for a spin off the beaches for Tailor and a quick flick to chase some backwater Bass during lockdown. After picking the brains of @Scienceman earlier in the year on chasing some Luderick (And never getting out to do so) he kindly invited me for an early morning fish in his boat! The forecast wasn’t looking to kind with showers expected all morning, but an early check looked like someone had gotten it totally wrong! Not a cloud in site! After a quick 6:00am launch at Woy Woy boat ramp and short cruise up Paddy’s Channel we soon had a bait out and worked an area Wazza had always gotten a feed of Flatties with plastics. After a few hours of zilch – Not that it mattered! It’d been way too long since we’d both been on the water, Wazza made the call to push further up into Brisbane Waters to try another spot he knew and try get us out of the wind. This spot also started off very slow until all hell broke loose the next few hours or so! 😀 The bait rod quickly went off as we drifted into deeper water and soon had a 35cm Snapper on board. I commented that I didn’t know they even got this big in Brisbane Water. Wazza decided to keep it in the livewell in case we got more for a feed! It didn’t seem long before he had another one the same size join it in the boat and it was looking like I wasn’t going to get a thing. 🙄 But…The rod I had decided to rig for bait all of a sudden took a massive run, taking the line almost down to the backing. We quickly called it for a small Jewie although I couldn’t feel any headshakes. I then thought it may be a stingray as it took another long run down stream without slowing down. After a few more short runs we finally got colour. RED! This looked a cracker fish and Wazza quickly had it in the net. 50cm in the Broadwater, still can’t believe it! Wazza continued to add to the bag with a beautiful 60cm Flattie hooked and landed soon after. With a few smaller Flatties and more Snapper on both the bait and plastics joining the bag we decided to call it a day at 12:00pm. A nice size tailor also had a lucky day that Wazza caught and released after we had already taken a few happy snaps. It was absolute bedlam back at the ramp as every man and his dog also had the same idea. I ended up getting a few feeds through the week out of the 3 fish I kept, making some fish tacos with the Snapper cooked in a spice mix, and fish wraps with the Flatties cooked in panko crumbs. 🤤 Thanks again for the cracker day on the water, and the beer Wazza! Can’t wait to get out again! 🤙🍻 Cheers, Brendo
    19 points
  8. Hey y'all, Decided to make the most out of my lunch break when the rain stopped briefly in the afternoon. Haven't had access to my usual spots since lockdown started on my birthday in June (by far the worst birthday prezzie I've ever recieved), and haven't had much luck in my LGA except for the odd flattie. Safe to say I was pretty happy when I landed a 37cm trevally and a couple of small bream. Pretty good way to celebrate lockdown finally easing.
    18 points
  9. Hit Lower Portland area again on Tuesday with a buddy and able to snare a kg of live prawns at the mouth of the Colo. The tide and moon were perfect (low tide .6 and Hightide 1.1) the Hawkesbury usually fires with small tidal difference. We caught 15 small Jewies, the largest just under legal😞 and 7keeper duskies and a bag of small bream 28-34, but none of bream (or Jewies kept of course). It rained all day (but you don’t melt in the rain and the fish are already wet, so didn’t put us off). Out again on Friday with Raider “Hugh” and his young son, hopefully chasing Kingies in the harbour for the first time since lockdown.
    15 points
  10. I asked “Charlie” my granddaughter what she would like to do for her birthday on Monday. “Go fishing with you grandad, with my pink rod” she said (My kinda gal). Don’t know if she’ll want to do this in 8 years when she’s 16, so strike while the iron’s hot. Because of the howling wind, we went float fishing in our top dam near the house for silver perch using corn and bread. We caught 11 fish in less than 1/2 an hour, before she lost interest and went off to chase lambs around the paddock and dip-netting for tadpoles with Grandma (Mrs Pickles) A great day to spend an 8th birthday.
    15 points
  11. Raider “Hugh” sent a message last week to get together and celebrate end of restrictions with a fishing session with his young fella “Theo”. We set either Thursday or Friday as the date, as the prediction was for rain and wind early in the week looked accurate. I’m glad we settled on Friday as Thursday was a shocker - wind, rain including thunderstorms and hailstorms. Friday was looking good in the morning, but unsettled in the arvo, so decided on local, rather than the harbour chasing Kingies, another good call as one of my buddies went to Brooklyn and was forced in early due to crook conditions. Using live prawns, we caught the runout tide at Webb’s creek, then down to Wisemans. Total catch for the day was a bit disappointing, but we ended up with a feed of flathead (3 keepers) and a nice bream of 38cm. And junior Raider “Theo” was excited to bag his first ever Jewfish - one at 39 and 42cm - released of course, but fun on light bream gear. Although not a report to “write home about”, the fellowship was great and it’s always a joy to get young blokes (and gals) out fishing - memories in the making.
    14 points
  12. G’day raiders, Just thought I’d share with you all a capture of a monster flatty from Port Stephens. One of my work mates I fish with and his dad, were out chasing flatties on the weekend and he comes up tight to this…… Measuring in at 105cm and safely released. A true fish of a lifetime and a memorable moment to share with your kids no matter what age! 👏👏👏 cheers scratchie!!!
    14 points
  13. Hi Raiders, Headed out quite early today as it is the last day of online learning and I'm going quite insane. Launched from Yowie Bay at first light(5:30) and shot over to Gooseberry Bay to try for some snapper and trevally. Straight away, first drop on the way down, a little chopper tailor took a liking to my pilly and snipped me of. After constant burley of pilly cubes for about 10 minutes the fish started to really bite. We were bringing up either a snapper of tailor every drop. My dad lost what was probably a really nice trevally as it swam under the boat and busted his hook. Not long after that I pulled up a nice 39cm trevally but with the quality of trevally we've been catching lately we thought it was under size. Just don't ask.... Next drop I hook something that starts to peel some line, it starts to run away from the boat and with the 6 pound line I was thinking; here we go again. I asked one of the more knowledgable people at the boat ramp what to do when you hook a big fish on light line. He said use a loose drag when he wants to run and then tighten it when you pump and wind. So here I am constantly adjusting my drag and pulling the anchor and running around the boat. Ended up being a rather nice trevally measuring at 47cm, this is the 4th one this year I've caught this exact size and the third trevally over 40cm in as many weeks!! Also managed a big yakka somehow, on the drop. The bait board is 50cm long. Sashimi and Ceviche tonight, yum!! ( I don't know what my face is in the first picture🤔) Cheers Isaac Ct
    14 points
  14. After my last unsuccessful trip out chasing Snapper it was time to give it another go. Saturday morning saw me up and out the house early, driving away from the Roseville ramp at around 6.45am. First stop was off Middle head for a few livies. Burleyed up and within seconds I was surrounded by perfect size Yakkas. Did not take me too long to get 7 or 8 in the live bait tank so pulled anchor and headed off towards Foul Ground. The conditions were perfect, a light breeze with and not too much swell so even in my little runabout I was able to motor out at a nice comfortable 18 knots after logging on with Marine Rescue. I often drift Foul Ground, however previously I have had more luck on Snapper when at anchor, so dropped the reef pick and sent down some baits. I was fishing a live bait around 2-3m off the bottom and a 2 hook paternoster with cut pillies on 4/0's on the other. First fish up was a Pig Fish, even though I recognised what it was I was not too sure how good they were to eat so back he went. Before I started this post I Googled Pig Fish and now know that I threw back a premium eating fish. Ah well, next time I catch one I'll keep it and give it a try. After a while I finally got one of my Targets, a Snapper, no pictures as it really was not photogenic enough, read too small, so back it went. The bite was pretty slow so moved to another spot on Foul Ground and hooked a Rock Cod. OK enough of that and headed off to another mark about a mile away. I had barley got my line in and I was onto a fish, I could tell by the head shakes that it was a Snapper but again it was under size, going around 28cm. This was followed by a Mowong, this one went around 33cm, but not a favorite of mine to eat so back it went. This was followed by 3 decent size Flathead, this was confusing as I was over reef expecting Snapper and other reef species, I guess I must have been close to the edge so the Flathead could not help themselves and snaffled the baits. Hey, no complaints from me as I love eating Flathead. Then it was time for the pickers, bait went down, tap tap tap, hooks came up clean, re-bait and back down, tap tap, etc etc. Time to move again. Decided to head closer in to Long Reef, this is when I experienced the highlight of the day. While motoring along I saw a Whale leap out of the water, full body clear and slam back down. This was right on the line I was traveling so kept going and out it came again and again and again. I cut the motor and sat back to enjoy to enjoy the spectacle which must have gone on for at least 10 minutes. I left him jumping around and having fun and headed on. As the Whales continued their journey North I headed on towards Long Reef. Got to my mark and sent down the baits. Within seconds I got the first hit, I knew it was a Snapper by the head shakes and this time it went over 30 so into the ice it went. Finally one of the target species on ice Who hoo. This was a great sign so back down the baits went only for me to be disappointed. I had caught the only Snapper that was at home on Long Reef that day, all the rest were at home due to Covid lockdowns so were not out to play. I did land a couple of reasonable size Trevally but threw them back as I was too focused on Snapper. Then it was pickers, Rock Cod, Wrasse and those annoying things that are stripped black and white with yellow fins. Bait thieves and a pain in the bum. The problem with them is that as soon as they find where the baits are going down they seem to hang around and just keep pinching the pillies. So time for another move. This time I headed to Iggies Reef but not for long. A couple of Rock Cod were enough so time to head in. I was a fun day with beautiful conditions and I manged to at least come home with a decent feed. Stay tuned for Snapper Time - Take 3, coming soon to a web site near you. 🙂 Tight lines All
    13 points
  15. Headed out at gentleman's hours on Friday for a fish on the rising tide over the flats. Collected some nippers and a few poddies first stop then headed up river but no joy except for an Uber Nipper pumped from a flat where I was trying to stir up some sand action. Measure 150mm from nipper to tail! No fish here but no wonder with a nipper that big....scared them off! Headed into Gunnamatta to drift along the front of the flats and it was pretty quiet except for a cormorant stealing one of my poddies. Spooked a couple of big flathead out of the weed beds and finally picked up a bream and a whiting before I had to pick wifey up from the wharf. Was stopped by a police officer on a jetski who politely asked for my license number and took off ready for the long weekend cowboys:) Headed onto the Maianbar flats and anchored up before a school of bream came along and a couple of luderick took a liking to the nippers too. Had a 1 m wobbie hanging around the keeper bag looking for an easy meal:) Ended up with a good feed of fillets so headed off as the storm clouds came over around 2pm. Wasn't planning to attempt a fish over the long weekend with the crowds of late. Filleted, skinned and boned, the fillets went down very well. Off now to put a leg of lamb on the BBQ for a feast before the GF. Happy days:)
    13 points
  16. G'day Raiders! I had planned to submit these closer to as they happened but things have been so chaotic lately! So, I figured I'd start from July and try and catch up! One of the few upshots of covid has been working from home...stressful in no shortage of ways I can assure you, but no commute means plenty more time to jump in the yak and get to know the creek better. I've been living near the creek for over a year now but have only recently been able to make the time to have a serious go at landing a feed. Until moving up here, I'd spent most of my fishing time (very sporadically) over the last 10 years chasing bass in creeks out west on poppers. It had been an age since I had a serious crack with a soft plastic. I blew the dust off my old gear and managed to scrounge some 10+ year old SPs that still looked like they might be good for a flick. My first success was on an RDO Monday towards the end of July. I was exploring up and down the creek hoping to pick up a flattie (or anything to be honest). I set out around 8am and paddled around for hours trying to find a fishy looking spot. It was a beautiful sunny day so and barely a breath of wind I figured worst case, it was a good chance to survey the bottom for future trips. I came across a nice sandy flat tailing off into a bit of a channel and figured I'd give it a drift on the way back. I was flicking ancient pink jerkshad probably about 3" or so on an equally old 1/8oz jig head. By this point I'd been in the kayak for at least 5 hours and I was starting to need to stretch the legs. I did get a couple of hits which was honestly good enough for me! But I figured I'd paddle up wind one more time for another pass. I'm glad I did because I landed my first little flatty in years! I was so stoked...and decided one more drift wouldn't hurt... I was on one of my "last" retrieves after not getting any hits on that pass. It wasn't until the lure was in sight- less than 2m from the yak- that I saw a beautiful flattie following closely. I resisted the urge to do anything sporadic and let the lure drop to the bottom. With just a tiny flick, the ravenous flathead engulfed the hook and started taking some 8lb braid off my old 2500 Stradic Ci4. It put up more of a fight than I expected from what I glimpsed following the SP! I reserved my celebrations (especially considering I had only just noticed the hole in my net) until I manged to net and yak the stunning 53cm flatty- my PB! Needless to say, I was chuffed to have landed enough for dinner and very glad that I hadn't given up sooner only to return empty handed- I was determined! I had just made some torilla the day before so I turned these 2 into delicious fish tacos! This went over very well with my partner- she has since been much more encouraging of my fishing endeavours! haha Since then, I've been re kitting myself for my target species of Bream, Flathead, EPs and Mulloway (I can dream...). I managed to get my hands on a bunch or new Zman SPs (slimswimz, grubz etc.) ,a new net and an array of lighter jigheads as well as re spool my old 1500 Cardinal 800t with some 6lb braid. I've been out on the water whenever I can since with some promising results...I'll be sure to detail those sessions in the next report!
    13 points
  17. Headed out early this morning to the deep near Lilli Pilli. Baits used were squid and fish strips. The pillies produced small stuff. Managed to pull out a few reddies, a few just over size, plus plenty of smaller ones. A small blue spot flattie in with the reddies. Also pulled out a couple of slightly bigger reddies, only one in the photo, and the other one of the same size was given to my mate before photos. When I phoned him, he was happy for a reddie, so I headed to his place in North West Arm. While there, I saw some small schools of fish getting into baitfish, so I threw out a lure for some time for not a hit on the lure. The splashes looked like tailor, but throwing the lure through the middle of the schools did nothing, so headed home.
    13 points
  18. As per usual it was a late start getting on the water for me, after 10am. I was quite surprised by the swell once I got out through the bar as it had looked pretty flat form land!!! I ended up getting side tracked by a family of whales, which after a while became pretty curious in my boat, in fact at one point I copped a soaking from one!!! There were whales around me all day at every spot I fished, though getting a few decent shots was proving as hard as the fishing. By the time I actually got my first soft plastic in the water it was after 1pm but none the less first drop resulted in a pan sized snapper. Decided to try and upload to the gone fishing day app but struggled as it seemed to want me to do a live video!!!! Second drop resulted in another red, only this was a sergeant baker, from there on I couldn't hook another fish until around 5pm. With a brisk breeze picking up I decided to anchor as my drift was to fast even using reverse to slow the drift. Two more snaps had dinner sorted before banjo rays and shovel nosed sharks took over the the next hour. I needed up using a 3ft kids rod with a 2000 reel with 8lb braid to make the action seem more fun. Ended up being a fun session even if the catch wasn't so good but gee standing in a centre console all day with choppy seas takes it out of you.
    12 points
  19. Well done @Scratchie Some sound advice on your write up in the Nautilus Marine magazine!
    12 points
  20. Have mostly been lying low fishing-wise during lockdown, but when doing one of my grocery shops recently, I decided to buy a few slimeys and salt them down ready for when we can get out more. This week my eldest asked me to take her fishing. She even promised to wake up early and get ready quietly so that it would only be the two of us. So this morning we got our chance. Woke up early, found everyone else asleep, so we took a slimey fillet out of the fridge and headed down to our local spot. Not sure if it was the rain or tides, but there wasn't the usual level of activity bite-wise. But reeling in to check on my bait, I came up tight on this model: No giant, but I think it felt bigger than it was because of the element of surprise. Was good to get a fish after so long, I think you could see my smile behind the mask! Happy snap and then back in the drink it went. Apart from that, my daughter got to experience a proper bite. Happened on the drop, so it took us both by surprise. She's relatively new to this fishing business so it is probably a good thing that we didn't connect - it was probably another legal bream and would have given her a run for her money on her little alvey rod. After that I was hankering for a coffee and had to get ready for work, so it was time to go home. Here's to things getting better so we can get out again!
    12 points
  21. Had the opportunity to slip out on the Hawkesbury today for a “pay day” with a PB bream going 49cm on a live prawn. Nothing big on the handline today, it was caught on ultra light gear - got it on a 2kg rod with 6lb line. I did land a little Jewie on the handline and a bag of nice Flatties - smallest going 40cm
    12 points
  22. A local on the MNC started running fishing comps over the last year, due to covid restrictions the last few have been State-wide bass/flathead comps, having missed the last few I was determined to at least put a fish on the scoreboard for this one. The weather did not turn it on, cold windy and rain meant flathead were a no go it was a upper river yak sesh for bass. On the river a 0630, conditions weren't looking great, started out casting a jigspinner slimswim around to my surprise it only took 7 minutes for the first hook-up (just bought an action cam looked back at the footage) it was a solid fish which railed me into the timber before pulling the hooks, hoping this wouldn't haunt me I kept the casts going. Three casts later landing the lure under a branch it gets slammed on the drop another good fish which also tried hard to brick me, pulled him out and a fish in the net a nice very healthy 38 to start the comp, feeling pretty confident I woukd easily fill my five fish limit. I spent the next 2 hours without a looker. It's funny how things can change in fishing, a massive mullet tried to eat my jigspinner yakside but didn't find the hooks, I swapped over to a hardbody so atleast a mullet would find the trebles, second cast with the hardbody on a ridiculously shallow log on the edge it gets nailed definitely not a mullet Fish number 2 that went 39.5 a bit skinnier than my fisrt fish but still in good condition and a lovely bronzie he came from the small log on the left, the places bass come from never ceases to amaze me. Again confidence was back that the hardbody was going to produce, again it was a decent period of time before any action. It often happens when you least expect but driftong along mindlessly casting I was woken from a daydream with another slamming hit another nice gish for the tally this one going 37, I was actually looking at a decent score. Unfortunately when getting out of the yak to walk up a rapid I slipped and tipped it and didn't realise I lost my brag mat which meant I couldn't enter anymore fish which in turn didn't matter because I didn't catch any more, so after 6 hours for 3 fish I pulled the pin. Cheers for reading Dave
    12 points
  23. went out yesterday morning with my dad and brother. first we went around the (Jibbon) bombie there was yellow tail every where my dad put one out for live bait but didn't get any hits. then we pulled out a flounder, just legal snapper and a rock cod but was a bit quiet. then we moved out to the flathead grounds we started in in 30m of water getting lots of small ones and just legal ones then i caught a bigger one at 51cm. we then moved out to around 50m of water and most drops getting a legal one spot whiting and we also got some red spot whiting and two small gurnard the time we finished the drift we were in 60m of water we then had another drift only keeping some. we then moved back to the bombie i had a solid hit on my line struck and hooked up with what thought was a port Jackson shark then saw colour and it was a 1.1m gummy it was quickly on the boat and in the esky. next drop i have another solid hit it is a huge rock cod then we see a couple of king fish in the berley trail so my dad threw out a pilchard head after not to long the rod screams off and my dad is hooked up to what we thought was a small kingfish then it got to the net and was a big snapper it measured 68cm 3.38kg it was a very successful day with lots of big fish. all fish were caught on 15 pound braid except the snapper which was on 3kg kobi
    12 points
  24. Planned to go fishing down at Wisemans on Tuesday, as it was this time last year I landed a beaut Jewie a bit further down from Wisemans toward Spencer - it went 89cm (pic below), but wind put a damper on that, so shot out today to catch the slack water at the turn of tide for Jewies. last few trips have resulted in lots of soapies around 35-50cm mark, so Not a keeper for home. However today was different and I got a good hard run on a decent fish that was dropped after a few minutes on th hand line, then a good fish of about 80cm on a pilchard on a rod (still use a rod as well as the hand line). It peeled off about 50 m of line in its initial run and about the same on second run, but kept head shaking all the way till I could see it. It threw the hook (4/0 circle) right at the side of the boat - didn’t have time to get the net under it😞😞. The fist Jewie was on a prawn and second (one seen, but not measured as wasn’t landed) on a pilchard. No pics as the fish wasn’t landed - caught3 legal duskies, so not a great day, but weather was very pleasant and only other boat on the water was a fisheries boat who came aboard to inspect - from Ourimbah base (central coast), so a fair run up the river for them. They said we were the only boat on the water. Very pleasant blokes, being Koori and not needing a fishing licence, I think they felt sorry and dished out some measure mats, crab rulers, booklets and said “have a good day”.
    12 points
  25. Hi Raiders, Went out to try a new spot in the South West Arm before school. Launch at Yowie Bay at 6:15 and headed to a new spot in the arm. Tried for some leatherjackets but only managed a couple of small bream, tarwhine and snapper, as well as some pretty decent sweep. Then moved up about 100m and burleyed up with old dog food and breadcrumbs, didn't take long before we started to get a couple of snapper. As I was fishing light I use a long leader and small sinker, had a really nice hit and missed it. Drop another bait right in the same spot and BANG! Hit well and started to run around the front of the boat, initial thoughts were a salmon or kingfish, then once it started to stay low maybe a big flattie. We pulled the anchor and had to chase after it because there is only half a spool of line on my reel and the fish had swum from one bank to the other side. Tail thumps and dead weight, has to be a trev. Using the angle of the rod, I slowly started to gain line on the fish but every time it would just run off. Adjusting the drag looser when the fish ran and tighter when winding can help to tire a fish down. Dilema one, there was someone else's fishing line wrapped around my line now. Dilema 2, we brought no net. After approximately of 25 minutes of paddling after the fish and adjusting the drag we have colour. An absolute thumping trevally. After a couple of rounds around the boat I decided to tail grip the fish. Got 'im. measured in at 55cm and an estimate 2-2.3kg. Released to fight another day and breed more of these fantastic fish. Cheers Isaac CT.
    11 points
  26. Finally got the chance to get out on the Georges River this morning and explore what was on offer within my 5km. Met up (COVID safe) with a great mate and with kids in toe and some frozen Hawkesbury prawns- started a few drifts from Baldface Point towards Tom Ugly’s bridge. Big shout out to Spiro and Mac’s Bait Bar who was able to organise the bait for me- best bait shop around! Didn’t hold the highest of hopes but just so happy to be on the water with family and friends. Needless to say the flathead kept coming! Over the next few hours in between a number of throwbacks we managed to hook 8 keepers and a nice little whiting. Biggest flathead was 58cm. As always the smiles say it all…. Can’t wait till next time…..
    11 points
  27. With the world going mad and with my line of work going to work and dealing with Covid on the front line I finally got a chance to go to the local creek two mins from home and flick some little Jackall cranks around the tree branches the bass were on fire. In the space of half an hour I had landed 8 bass with the hook straightening on a proper one. Slow rolling the cranks with the odd pause was firing the fish up massively. All fish released, too good a species to only catch once
    11 points
  28. Rosalie my beloved daughter landed her first brown trout, exceeding my own pb, proud yet jealous I have to say -10% jealous.... 110% proud
    10 points
  29. Was heading out with my mate to Bate Bay this arvo, but he bailed so I headed out myself this morning. Plenty of spikies at first, then a couple of just legal blue spots until I drifted out a bit past Kurnell, where I found a couple of better ones. When I hit deeper water, the rig was bitten off above the swivel, no bite so probably a jacket. Fortunately no others. Only 1 fish in the deeper water, so headed back in a bit and found a couple more, then headed home with my limit. The biggest at 54cm. Early on, the wind and swell was short and sharp from the N/E, left over from yesterday. Wind will be chopping it up again later on.
    10 points
  30. Despite being limited to local rock fishing of late I haven't managed to catch many drummer this winter, a few outings with one or two and plenty with zero. A lot more fisho's on the rocks mid week this year I guess due to covid they can't travel and work hours are obviously flexible, so my local rocks have had more fishing pressure I reckon . Anyway I decided to have another go on Thursday arvo and it felt a bit weird going drummer fishing when the temp hit 30 degrees here - I'm used to cold winds and even colder water when chasing the pigs off the rocks. When I arrived I was disappointed to see two guys already on the wash I wanted to fish. The swell and tide were both low enough to try a wash that is usually unfishable so I thought may as well give it ago and see if the other blokes leave after a while (they didn't but that didn't matter as it turned out). It took a few casts to work out which way the wash moved the bait and where the shallow rocks were but after a while a got a few bites and sprang off a fish that could have been a drummer. I re-baited with a prawn and cast into the white water and quickly came up tight on what was obviously a drummer as he went straight down for the nearest overhang. He jammed himself in and I wasn't optimistic of getting him out but I lay the rod over in the opposite direction and kept steady pressure on as a few waves came through and must have dislodged him and he took off in another direction looking for the next hole. I knew this was my best chance and lent heavily on the rod and lifted and wound as hard as possible and just got him to the edge of the rock shelf in front of me. That's when I had my first glimpse of the fish and got really stressed as it was way bigger than I'd expected. I paused till the next wave came through that lifted him over the lip of the shelf and onto a long ledge below me with enough water to bring him back another 8 or 10 meters to where I could jump down and lift him up. If you've ever tried to pick up a wet cranky drummer you'll know how slippery they are. So it was a few tense moments till I could step back up to dry rocks while hugging the drummer in an effort not to drop him. It was a good length (measured later at just under 53cm) but ridiculously fat! I don't take scales with me but reckon it would have been 3-4 kg. I put my knife next to it to give some scale. I fished on for another hour catching one more smaller drummer that went around 38cm but the sweep had moved in and then the southerly buster came through so I called it quits but was very pleased to finally have a decent fish to bring home. Cheers Fil
    10 points
  31. Haven't been able to get out fishing for a while now, this morning was the chance. Fished the bottom of the tide 10.30 to 12.00 with stringy weed from a local creek. A lot of small fish but managed a feed. These were the best 2.
    10 points
  32. Headed out through a nasty bar this morning with my daughter, conditions were pretty poor with only one other boat venturing out (a commercial Cootacraft). Had a bit of a flick around the island but the bluefin that had been just about everywhere yesterday were proving hard to find. The NE picked up to around 20knots and with the swell and run out tide I decided to head back home. We copped a bit of a flogging but still managed to hold 22-23knots before reaching walls of white water at the bar. There's times when even 90hp on a 14ft boat doesn't feel enough!!!!...like when you cant see the bar because you are deep in a trough between waves!!!. Anyway got back in feeling very happy how well the little 445 had handled. A couple of hours later we get a call from the Cootaracraft still at the island and out of fuel with the NE now pushing 28 knots. Narooma bar was now closed meaning even if my daughters boss had allowed her to borrow the big boats she skippers the boats wouldn't be insured now the bar was over 2m. Marine rescue don't do fuel transfer so it would of meant the Bermagui steber was the only option. A few issues arise from that, first being lockdown but the worst would mean being towed through bar crossing with now 3m seas. We made the decision to assist so that no crews from seperate families or contacts from outside lockdown range would be involved. We picked up three jerry cans of fuel and headed to Bermi, where we launched and headed out into some disgusting seas most sane people wouldn't be heading out in. Wind was pushing 28 knots with some stronger gusts every now and then. Swell and seas had turned into good sized breaking waves that really tested the little formula. The 22k run to Montague was slow and took constant throttle work to the point my wrists were cramping from holding onto the wheel and throttle (wearing wetsuits). Luckily the vessel in trouble had managed to stay reasonably sheltered which helped with putting in two of the fuel cans and I could certainly see we had gone through a fair amount ourselves just getting out there. The run home running with the sea, even though it was big seemed so much fun compared with the run out there. The little formula was managing to stay around 22-24 knots in seas around 3m which made me very happy with my decision to drop down to such a small boat, these things really can punch well above their weight when needed. All home safe and sound now and no sign of cracks in the hull, so Im pretty happy.
    10 points
  33. Hi Raiders, Headed out early from Yowie Bay at 6:00 with my sister to do a bit of exploring and fishing. Stopped at the usual spot at South West Arm and first drop a tailor hit me on the way down. The first 30 minutes where mayhem with a bait rarely touching the bottom as the tailor where smashing our baits. Pulled out 2 legal ones but both were released. Tailor were caught on pillies then made the move to prawns and pulled up a nice trevally (37cm released) and plenty more small snapper, tailor and tarwhine. Headed up the South West Arm for a bit of a ride and came across all the moored boats. One of our family friends used to own one of them and about 4 years ago my sister fell between 2 of the moored boats and split her chin open, luck our friend is a paramedic. We then proceeded to wander around Lilli Pilli and found a bee floating in the water and naturally he had to be 'saved'. So I forfeited 20 minutes to pick Humbert the bee up and drive him to Lilli Pilli and place him on some flowers to be safe. Then headed up the North West Arm to grays point and had a 10 minute fish up their for some 'jackets and managed a couple. Didn't keep any today as my mum was making a fantastic dinner😀. Came across a couple of guys at the Rathanes fishing for King's and they had instead caught a big salmon and a nice flattie. Cheers Isaac CT
    10 points
  34. Well, the dog just went nuts at the door and I opened it for the delivery driver and was surprised to see two reasonably sized boxes. It took me a while to realise they were from Shimano. My hopes went up… what could be in such large boxes? A full suite of Stellas? Or Tiagras? Reality kicked in, however, when I lifted the boxes and realised they were quite light. Upon opening, I discovered they were packed with lots of air bags… unnecessary in my opinion but they will come in handy as I pack fragile items for our move in a couple of weeks. As I expected, I won some Shimano promotional gear: sticker, bottle opener, cap, neck shade combo thingie, and a gear bag. Still, I’m happy with that and I’m glad they came.
    10 points
  35. Headed out early this morning near Lilli Pilli. The bites were a bit slow, but managed a feed. Baits were salted tailor strips, pillies, squid strips. A few pickers removing the bait without moving the line. Also pulled out a couple of reddies just over the size limit. The wind was up, a bit squally at times, but no rain. While heading home, I saw a number of fish hitting the surface in the main channel west of Burraneer Bay. They looked like salmon, threw a lure through the school a few times but not a hit so kept heading home.
    9 points
  36. Went out in Port Hacking this morning looking for a few fish for a feed. I found the fishing a bit slow but over a couple of hours managed a feed from the deeper water. Surprising how hard the little reddies go on little 2 kg outfits.
    9 points
  37. Headed out into the Hacking after work this afternoon. Pumped some nippers but the tide was very low and access to the flats was minimal. Picked up a nice whiting and a bream in Burraneer Bay then encountered a few rays near Maianbar. On dark i picked up a thumper whiting in deep water and another bream so a few fillets to take home.
    9 points
  38. As per usual, the morning ritual of getting up at 4:30 and launching at Yowie Bay at 5:30 was upheld as I decided to pick up a mate from Wally's Wharf, plenty of space to spread out on the boat. Headed to the usual spot in Gooseberry Bay and immediately started to pull in small tailor and snapper. Had a massive school of whitebait under the boat for ages but couldn't get the salmon or tailor to hit the lures or baits. Plenty of small tarwhine also before the big trev came along. Measured at 42cm, caught on peeled prawns. Also pulled up a Gurnard but decided to release as it was only lip hooked. Then travelled up the arm and moored next to the bigger boats, I usually find they do the berleying for you. First drop and pulled out a nice bream, 30cm and no chance of survival. A yakka school showed up so kept a couple for next trips bait. More snapper and tailor before we moved to the 4 knot marker to pick up some leatherjackets for the neighbours. We managed 3 nice Yellowfin jackets then caught, a six-spined jacket, a gunters wrasse, a weed whiting, a small blackfish, a cuttlefish on pillies and a little flattie. Not a bad day at all, 14 species in one day, that has gotta be some sort of record. Cheers Isaac CT
    9 points
  39. Headed out early this morning. Ended up in South West Arm as the nor-wester was stronger than forecast, and would have been blowing against me where I originally planned to go. The only fish I kept was the red gurnard, and a yakka for bait strips. Bugger all there. Packed up after sunrise and headed to Maianbar flats. Pumped some nippers and the whiting turned up after a while. Enough for a few feeds, then headed home. School holidays lunatics about in small fast boats.
    9 points
  40. Hi Raiders, Once again I persuaded my dad to get up at 4:30 to launch at the crack of dawn at Yowie Bay. Plenty of surface action and chucked a slug for one cast and got bit of by a nice tailor. Great way to lose $20 fast. Head to the usual spot in Gooseberry Bay and started pulling up some small tailor although there were a couple of nice ones amongst them. Got snapped of by a bigger trevally, easy to tell as they just swim laps of the boat; couldn't get the anchor up fast enough and it just went thank you very much and that was that. Pulled up a nice Gurnard and a nice snapper. I wanted to keep the snapper but of course my dad 'accidentally' let go and my dinner plans were ruined. Mind you, I had a very nice dinner and was happy with the result. Ended up with 3 tailor 32-38, 1 gurnard 37 and the trevally and snapper were both 36. All released. Fish were caught on pillies and prawns. After I dropped my dad of at the jetty as he had a plasma donation later I decided to head out by myself and managed some more small tarwhine and snapper. Lost something bigger but it didn't feel like a trev so maybe a snapper or Jewie? Got to busy so left right when I ran out of bait. Cheers, Isaac CT
    9 points
  41. One year on our annual houseboat trip, half the guys had to leave early for work commitments. Nothing new about that happening, it's always hard to coordinate 6 or 7 people for an entire 5 day trip during the week. Weekend trips weren't as difficult to organise, but with either work or family commitments, the longer trips would normally have at least one or two early retirements. So by day 4, there were only three of us left aboard, John M, Myself and our other mate who I'm going to call RB, as the following story did embarrass him. The RB stands for Red Bull, his favourite drink and it contributed in part to the events of the night. After dropping off three of the guys at Cottage Point where their car was, we made our way back up to Waratah Bay in Cowan, where we'd stayed a couple of nights already that week. There's only two public moorings in the bay and even during winter, it's hard to find one free, we did have one the previous night, but as you can only stay on them for 24hrs at a time, generally, as one vessel vacates, another quickly takes it place. Having a mooring to tie up to is very convenient and also takes the worry of both anchoring and being moved around by the wind- which can be a common occurrence during the strong westerly winds of mid winter. By the time we arrived back at Waratah, the moorings had both been secured by other craft, so we decided to anchor in the deep water on the downstream side of the bay, out towards where the bay merged into the main part of Cowan Creek. We've caught a lot of different species while fishing this deep area, other than the main target of Hairtail, we've got Bream, Snapper, Flathead, Mulloway, Tailor, Salmon, Frigate Mackerel, John Dory and even a 16kg Blue Groper- just to name a few, plus quite a few small sharks. As the spot is virtually at the entrance to the bay, almost anything can turn up and each new incoming tide brings the expectation of a new school of fish arriving. We'd had a good trip this year, with plenty of quality fish caught, no Hairtail, but the other fish landed were really good size and as long as a few get caught each year, the year's trip is deemed a good one. The bulk of the catch were Bream and good sized Tailor in the 1.5kg+ size range, they always give you a good fight on the 4-6kg tackle and taste great when cooked on the boat's BBQ. Those who don't like eating them may never have had one cooked super fresh like this- cooking them in the fat left after doing a few sausages gives them a real nice flavour. After anchoring with both bow and stern anchors, we re-set our burley containers and fished for Yellowtail for a while- we still had a fair few live ones in the box we keep them in, but you can never have too many, as they supplement the nights cube burley as well as being the prime live bait. Once the Yellowtail have turned up in the burley, they generally stay around the boat pretty much all night- which is great for attracting all the bigger fish that feed on them. Catching these Yellowtail is a really simple matter, a size 12-14 longshank hook on 4lb line, with a tiny piece of split-shot pinched on about a foot above the hook for weight is all you need. Bait for them can be literally anything, but a really tiny piece of any type of Tuna or Bonito with the skin left on is perfect and you can catch stacks of them on one piece of bait by basically just 'poling' them in. Yellowtail secured in the laundry basket hung over the side, burley cut up in readiness for the night and an early dinner for us, well before dark. Nobody ever thinks of doing anything other than fishing during the prime time of dusk, so dinner is either well before dark or some time late into the night, not that dinner is usually very complicated, as we've got used to taking a few pre cooked meals like lasagne's in individual disposable foil containers. Having food pre-cooked and in containers for each crewman, means you eat when you feel like it, just placing dinner containers in the boat's oven. Simple measures like this contribute to an easy trip, in fact, quite often, the only meals that require cooking are the breakfasts or the occasional fish meal done on the vessel's BBQ. Another 'big' factor with taking pre-cooked meals is no washing up is necessary! Sounds lazy I know, but it's just part of making for an 'all fun-no stress' type of trip each year and we like to think we've 'refined' it down to maximum comfort and fishing time. Usually on these trips, the houseboat's supplied tender- an 'unsinkable' poly rowing boat complete with oars, gets a fair bit of use fishing wise. These little boats only come supplied with oars and a bailing container, no anchor or anything else at all, as they are basically just used for transport from the houseboat to the shore or riverside store at Cottage Point. Daylight hours have the boat in use for getting in to the sandbanks, which lie at the end of pretty much every bay in Cowan. Accessing these banks you can stretch your legs, pump nippers or have a fish on the edges of the drop-offs that connect the banks to the deep water and undoubtedly some of the guys will have a fish along these spots. Due to both the cold and heavy condensation levels of the area after dark, the little boats aren't often used of a night and we generally moor them amidships against the houseboat where they don't get in the way of fishing. With only three of us left aboard for the final night of the trip, we set plenty of live baits out for Hairtail and established a constant cube trail to supplement the other two burley dispensers we had out all afternoon. One of these has basically just mashed Pilchard and 'flaked' Tuna while the other is only finely mashed bread, which drips out constantly and keeps the Yellowtail mass close by. Everything set, we waited while the last bit of daylight quickly merged into darkness- prime predator time. It was a really large incoming tide, the water was nice and clean and the bioluminescent life was making every water movement 'glow'. For those who haven't seen this glowing effect, everything that moves in the water disturbs the tiny bioluminescent creatures (which look like tiny clear scales) and on being disturbed, emit a short amount of 'glowing light'- which reveals whatever has moved within a few inches of them. Some nights, everything from the anchor rope to your fishing lines will have a glowing trail emanating from them and everything fish-wise that moves around quickly and excitedly can be seen. Everything except the Hairtail that is, their super 'teflon-smooth' skin enables them to move around easily without disturbing anything at all and gives these strange fish the ultimate stealthy approach when chasing prey. A couple of hours after dark and no Hairtail had showed up, a few more good sized Tailor had come aboard and a few squid, but the hoped for Hairtail were a no show. As things got quiet towards high tide, RB decided that he'd take the tender out and have a go along the drop-off, about 250m away. There's a small creek that pushes up another 250 or so meters from the drop-off, it's only a trickle unless the tide is well in and often there are some really large Bream moving around in this spot towards high tide. We'd had a couple of drinks, only a couple, as we'd long banned getting drunk on houseboat trips and everyone only takes enough grog for a coupe of drinks per day. It is after all a fishing trip and although a couple of drinks is fine, with cramped living conditions, it's a better trip without much grog aboard, and this has been a 'condition of boarding' for quite a few years now. RB loved drinking Red Bull energy drinks and had probably had at least 4-5 throughout the afternoon, plus a couple of Scotches after dark, but was fine to go out in the tender, as he wasn't going very far and there were two other houseboats (on the moorings) and two other small fishing boats within view. Before quietly rowing away from our houseboat, he did however grab a four pack of Red Bull cans to take with him and he headed towards the junction of creek and sandbank which was just obscured by a corner from our position. John and I fished on, catching a couple more Tailor and a couple of squid on the live baits before a thick fog started to descend on the bay. RB had been gone for well over an hour as the fog started to come lower and we were surprised he hadn't come back, as the night air was by now absolutely freezing, but he's a very experienced fisher and outdoorsman, so we just assumed he was getting some decent fish. Another hour passed and the fog descended right to water level, it was one of those pea-soup thick fogs- one you couldn't see any more than a couple of meters through and it looked like ultra fine rain with smoke in our torch light. By this time, we were getting concerned and put one of our head torches on 'strobe' function, as well as all the lights on in the houseboat, before calling out and whistling for a good few minutes. No reply or sound of anything at all. There was another large houseboat moored about 50-60m from us and before the fog rolled down they would have probably been able to see around the corner obscuring our view, but they were inside their vessel with young kids and no doubt had all the doors and windows closed and we got no response from them either. As we knew RB was going to go up the creek with the high tide, we just hoped he was getting some Bream and there wasn't some sort of problem because we couldn't really up anchor and drive a 50ft houseboat around in that sort of fog safely anyway. Time passed and the tide was dropping considerably, which meant that RB would have to get out of the creek before he became stuck for the night, but still no response to our calls and for those knowing the area, of a night, with no wind at all, you could hear a pin drop- it's that quiet. It was now over 4hrs since he'd left and we could no longer see the other houseboat's lights or in fact anything at all. No good calling anyone, as with the fog like it was, visibility was basically only a few meters for everyone. Then all of a sudden, we heard a noise towards where we knew the shore was, and recognizing the sound of an oar splashing the surface, knew it was RB coming back. When he appeared out of the fog, he was kneeling in the little boat and using an oar like a paddle. As he got up close to the houseboat, he still hadn't replied to our greeting and we knew something was badly wrong. On reaching the side he said "help" and we gaffed the short tow-rope on the front of the tender and pulled him around the back to where the boarding platform is and got him out of the boat. RB was soaking wet and had some shocking scrape marks on his head and hands, with plenty of dried blood on his forehead. He was absolutely freezing and shaking dreadfully, but could barely speak, and just said "drink quick", so we got him a water and he gulped it down. Only then he managed to speak and said he'd fallen in and become disorientated as to where we were, in relation to where he was. We decided to put him in the shower to warm him up and he recovered enough to tell us what had happened, but was suffering from hypothermia from being wet and freezing for an extended period. After getting dry from the hot shower, we got him straight into his sleeping bag and put a stack of the houseboat's supplied doona's on him while John and I talked about correct procedures for hypothermia, although we both have work-cover accredited first aid certificates, neither of us had ever treated the condition before. It took a while, but RB finally stopped shaking and started to warm up, before relaying what had happened after he rowed away from us. He said that after fishing along the edges for a fair while and slowly floating up to the sandbank at the inner side of the bay-right where the creek came out- he'd spotted heaps of good sized fish disturbing the bioluminescent life and thought they were Bream and he'd try for them. Every time he got close though, the 'glow' from the little boat's movement would spook the fish, which moved further up into the tiny creek. So he decided to tie the boat up against the shore and stalk them on foot. He got out of the boat and moved along a little, but the side of the bay he was on has basically no access along the shore, so he decided to go upwards. This proved to be a bad move because he continued going upwards and soon found himself pretty much on the side of a sheer wall about 15 or so meters above the water. He could still see the bioluminescent movements almost below him and moved slowly along the edge, high above the water. His plan was to come down on the only accessible large boulder a bit further up and fish from it just above water level. The stone part of the 'wall' ended and was replaced by really steep bush with a soil base and he moved along this edge by grabbing saplings and hillside vegetation to steady himself. He was wearing work boots, but they didn't have a great tread on them and he had wet weather gear on and was pretty hot from his climb. After making it along to above his destination rock, he drank his fourth Red Bull can and started the near vertical descent down. About 10 meters above the rock he started slipping and regardless that he grabbed plenty of vegetation on the way down, he picked up speed and tumbled at least 5 or 6 meters down the last bit, landing between the only two boulders at water level. Everything on the level he landed on was covered in oysters and he cut himself as he tumbled and slid- only his expensive wet weather gear saved him from more skin loss, but his $600+ jacket and waterproof trousers were torn badly. He actually landed on his feet and never lost contact with the hillside or he would have been injured really badly and was also extremely lucky to have landed between the boulders and not on one, how he didn't at least break an arm was genuinely miraculous, but injured and shocked he was. He was also lucky that landing in the water, albeit shallow, helped to cushion the fall, but he did bang his head badly and had a lump on his head by the time he got back to us. He was completely saturated and had lost his expensive rod and reel and small bag of bait and tackle. When he realised he hadn't broken any bones, he waded back through chest high water to where he'd wedged an oar in the rocks and tied the boat to it, but couldn't pull the oar out of where he'd wedged it, so decided to use the remaining oar like a paddle and headed in what he thought was the direction back. After paddling for a while, he realised he'd gone the wrong way in the fog and was totally lost, no other craft visible to him, so he turned back and managed to find the creek mouth eventually, in part because the school of fish was now coming back out of the creek and their glowing trails were his markers. When we asked why he hadn't called out? He replied he was so dehydrated from drinking Red Bull and chain smoking cigarettes that he couldn't even call out, which was what he was like when he finally made it back to the big boat. As we weren't sure if he was suffering from concussion from the lump on his head, we decided to keep him awake, with John and I talking to him, we finally let him get a bit of sleep several hours later, when the silence was broken by the sound of a reel's ratchet alerting a fish had taken a live bait. As fishing had been completely forgotten since RB's return, lines hadn't been monitored at all and the ratchet heralded a decent fish was moving with a bait. We left RB in his pile of warmth and went out to attend to the fish, which was on one of John's rods. It was a big Tailor and had been on the line long enough to have swum several laps around the boat, picking up every other line in the process and causing the most monumental tangle of all time. All the lines had to be reeled in and the resulting mess and line snarl had to be cut off- no chance of untangling multiple live baits that'd swam around and around each other. By the time we reset all the baits, RB was sound asleep and seemed to be breathing OK, so we let him sleep and kept an eye on him, before resuming active fishing again. We caught some good fish before dawn, but as soon as it was light enough, John got back in the little boat and went looking for RB's gear. About 20 minutes later John was back with the lost rod, tackle bag and the missing oar. He said there was a huge 'slide mark' on the side of the hill and we should have a look at it before we left. When we'd had breakfast, John and I rowed over to the slide mark to check it out and sure enough, where RB had come down was in the small gap between two large boulders. He'd taken everything in his path down with him as he slipped- soil, shrubs and dirt were all over the rocks below the slide, indicating exactly where he'd come down and we just shook our heads as we looked- he never should have attempted what he had-it was far too dicey. We rowed back to the houseboat and found RB up making a coffee, so we knew he was well enough to question more, especially after us seeing his accident site and John retrieving his expensive Sustain reel and custom rod. The trip finished that day, but at the post-trip meeting, it was decided in the future, nobody was to take the small boat out again after dark. RB was extremely lucky to have survived that night, if he hadn't been able to find us he may well have frozen to death and that's after missing landing on the rock, hitting the oysters and becoming dangerously dehydrated from only drinking Red Bull. It could have been a tragedy and it's the one thing we've never made jokes about, even years later.
    9 points
  42. Afternoon All. Fished Berowra on Monday and Tuesday. Weather was that annoying nuisance, miserable drizzly rain all day! Didn't stop. I was planning to camp out on the tinny overnight but didn't feel like getting too wet.. So Just went home for the night and back in the morning. Bait is plentiful in the System, Herring is schooling in most of the bays between Bennets and the ferry (pulling up full strings on a sabiki Jig) after a bit of Berley. Sat in a few usual spots, But I wasn't watching the tides too much.. Didn't seem to be whole lot of action on the flatties. Did pull up a few nice Jew, between Legal and 90 (all went back - Only chasing a monster at the moment) All at the top of the tide and start of the runout. Took a drift whilst I made a coffee and had a bite to eat and pulled up a 68cm Flatty on a livey, And a 43cm Bream on a butterflied bait. Water seemed to be clearer between Bennets bay and the Ferry than it was further towards barpoint. Seen alot of herring schools getting chased, What looked like a few sharks on the sounder. Water was around 18 C, Warming up nicely! Will head back out Monday after the weekend at work and see what I can muster up, still deciding to stay in Berowra for now or head up the top of the river and get a few flatties. No photos - I need to remember to get my phone out and take some, Never have really been one to take them.. I will make a mental note for next time. Cheers Jono
    8 points
  43. Raiders thanks for being model citizens of our community - a big thanks to all. Tomorrow do all your usual pre fishing checks and add masks and a check of restrictions for the area you live in. Have proof of vaccination available for inspection. We are all looking forward to reading some fishing reports with lots of pics of raiders with big grins displaying their captures.
    8 points
  44. NOT a report but....... WHOS READY TO GO FISHING FROM MONDAY AND BEYOND.🥳🥳 I plan on putting at least 100 hrs on my engine this summer 👊🤞 A little cheesy i know but, i might shed a tear when i get to the ramp. That salty sea breeze i have been day dreaming about for months.
    8 points
  45. Alrighty, a pretty action packed trip last night! Got out a bit later then I would've liked and paddling over to where I was fishing took a little bit longer then expected. Arrived at around 8.15pm and sounded out the bottom and decided to anchor on a river bend on the edge of a drop off which drops from 2.5 down to 6-7 meters not to far from Alfred's point bridge First rod - a whole pille/ mullet strips with a heaver sinker second rod - whole fresh squid, set up with a small sinker and I would open the bail arm every 5 mins to let it drift with current both rods had 14 pound leader/ 20lb braid to begin with Had a third rod to try and catch some of mullet or tailor which came close to my burly bag, while putting bread on the hook my rod with squid over and take a few meters of moderately tight drag, i grab the rod and as soon as tension was applied the line cut - bullshark Upgraded leader to 20lb and threw out another whole squid also replaced the pilchard with a fresh mullet strip 9.40pm rolls around and i put my second jacket on, as I sit back down my rod with squid buckle's and the drag is flying off, this run easily took 75meters of line and I'm thinking of when is it going to cut me off, then the famous run ends, and dead weight until under the kayak where I loosen the drag and i finally feel those big thumping headshakes and it makes a few small runs. I tangle with my other line somehow but the fish is on the surface, a few attempts netting it. finally goes in, my god, its big. Colossal tangles in the net and a large jew taking up the entire deck of the kayak, I sat there looking at it in awe, spent a stupid amount of time cutting lines, untangling the net and struggling the even lift the slimy basted of the deck never alone release it without flipping the kayak, I knew it was too late, the fish would release poorly so I made the decision to put it out of its misery and eat my first ever jew. Im a catch and release guy, but if i do get a feed I like to keep the slightly above legal models and leave the big ones for someone else to catch, my only regret of the night is not trying to release it and not taking so long just looking at the fish, trying to measure it and also untangling the net. The fish was 104cm, stoked to have cracked the meter. took it over to Georges river national park where I fillet the fish, some for me and some for the neighbour and gave the other half of the fish to a group of boys fishing for jews along the shoreline there. Forgot the fish had a tag, hopefully they see it and know what to do with it, as it was still in the fish. So, a few lessons learnt, all of which is handling the fish. That is basically loosing myself once I netted the fish and having no idea what to do next, even though I did I just went... blank. space restrictions on the kayak meant that handling a large fish like this was extremely difficult. Hopefully everyone who I have given some fish to make good use of it. I would've loved to have entered to tag data but silly me didn't even see the fish had a tag till I was scaling it. Should've take then numbers right then and there Here's the picture and its final measurement 104cm, caught 9:55pm on a whole fresh squid just after the change of the tide which was at 9:05pm, Georges river, near Alfred's point bridge. Not sure when the next trip is, but ill still post my journeys here.
    8 points
  46. Plan was to head offshore and dive (free dive for paper nautilus )but unfortunately these amazing creatures seem to of moved on. Had a 3ft kids rod onboard with a little 2000 spin reel and 8lb braid so decided to change my plan and catch a few reef fish for a family meal. Things didn't seem overly promising when I discovered the small bag of bait I thought I had picked up turned to be fish skin from some fish fillets of a previous trip!!!! Anyway dropped down two hooks with fish skin on and was instantly rewarded with a double hookup of a 42cm snapper and a 39cm wrasse. The fishing remained good for about 1hr with a mix of species including a pretty gurnard. So much fun on the silly little rod, had to play these small fish right to the boat and hope the sharks didn't get them. A mate called up to ask if I would head out in his new boat with him as he was a bit nervous given our bar crossing was pretty poor. So I agreed to pull the pin and shoot home (currently 12k offshore) and drop my boat off and meet back at the ramp in 1hr. The new $220,000 6m trailer boat is a weapon, powered by the latest Yamaha 300 and just about every gadget available including flir camera and pie oven etc!!!. The bar crossing now had a maritime 9m vessel sitting just inside in the sheltered side with the skipper turning boats back from the crossing due to wave and swell height. Luckily for us the maritime officer knows I work commercial vessels from here and had also just seen me cross the bar with my smaller boat, so allowed us to head out. The boat was impressive as I got to run it head on into some pretty nasty slop at around 30kts until we reached large schools of yellowfin tuna around 20 miles offshore. These were only surfacing as they smashed through bait schools for a brief few seconds before vanishing again and again!!! We tried several methods but couldn't get a hookup. Unlike the bluefin over the last few weeks that would simply swim to the boats and take just about any lure presented to them. A sudden westerly (pushing offshore from where we are) hitting over 30kts had us turning for home in a quick dash for protection. These sudden winds are why boats with gig hp are so good here, simply so we can throttle down to get out of it quick and quickly we did. This boat flies, quite literally we were skimming from the tops of waves at around 35-38kts on that run home.
    8 points
  47. Hi BH, You've just hit on one of the two topics that really get under my skin (the other is barometric pressure). Many years of TV program hosts talking about within 1 hour either way of high or low tide is the best time to fish has resulted in many people blindly believing or repeating it. Here is my take on it. Firstly, the whole harbour or water system does not start firing up as soon as the tide falls within these magical windows. If it were that simple I'd check out the tide charts and then head down to the water, catch fish for 2 hours and then go on to my next activity. Doesn't work like that for me or anyone I fish with. Do I believe tides matter - on the whole, yes. It is not so much the tide but what is happening during the tide and at specific locations. Examples: Mangroves. On a rising tide fish can move into them to pick at insects or food dropping from the trees. On a falling tide food can get washed out. Back eddies around structures in the water depending on which way the tide is flowing. These might trap small baitfish. Sand flats when the fish can move in to feed on yabbies or crustaceans and the oysters on the rocks Long reef as the incoming tide hits the wall and pushes the smaller fish over the lip Spit bridge in Sydney. There is a lot of water coming through that narrow neck into and out of Middle Harbour meaning the tidal flow is pretty quick through there. Fish will generally not want to work hard for their food as it wastes energy (watch trout in a stream as they hide in the eddies created by structure and pop into the stream to grab an insect then pop back to their holding point). On the low and high tide as the water changes direction it is easier for them to sit in that area. They could also hide in the eddies in front of or behind the bridge pylons and waiting for food to come past. Oyster leases as the water moves over them exposing the other residents to the predatory fish. I do keep a tide chart in my car. On low tide there are areas I like to fish (e.g. walking on the rocks and oysters around the edges of bays). High tides make these impractical to fish so I head to other spots that give me good access on a high tide. Fish are also opportunistic feeders. Put the right thing in front of them at the right time and they'll probably take it regardless of what the tide is doing at that particular time. When my line is in the water I have a chance at catching a fish so my approach has been to get out there and fish whenever I can. Just some food for thought. Derek
    8 points
  48. Over the weekend i've spent a bit of time in the yak where in my stretch was quite windy. The bite was consistent over my combined 5 hours fishing, mostly almost or just legal whiting taking a Jackson Pygmy popper in yellow. Fortunately though I got a new PB for surface whiting so my efforts in less than ideal conditions were rewarded. I kept my two legals and both were cooked in the pan with lemon and butter. Through the week I picked up a new Shimano Vangard 2500 paired up to a Zodias UL 1-3kg 7ft rod. The new combo is a dream compared to my other stuff. It was always my thoughts that topwater fishing shut down particularly in southerly winds, however the popper seemed to work better. Maybe something in that? I started off using an Ebi-panic but couldn't get a follow. Has anyone got any thoughts on this? All up 3 x Small Bream 20-25cm 6 x Whiting 25-27(ish)cm 1 x Whiting 28cm 1 x Whiting 34.5cm Photos to come.
    8 points
  49. Late Wednesday I was looking at the forecast and decided that it looked like being a good day on Thursday. Was I ever right. 🙂 I was under strict instructions from She Who Must Be Obeyed not to catch any more Flathead as after bagging out on my last 2 trips on Flathead we had plenty in the freezer and we did not need anymore. So Snapper was the target species for this trip. Launched at Roseville around 7.00am on Thursday and headed off to the first Snapper mark. First stop, the island off the front of Balmoral for some Yakkas. Burled up, got the bait jig in and nothing. I could see these small grey things swimming around but not a Yakka in sight. After 20 minutes I figured that pillies where going to be the bait du jure and headed on out. Got to my first mark, a drift out near Foul Ground and sent down 2 lines, one with 5/0 Circle hooks that I leave in a rod holder and another with 4/0's that I hold, both baited with pillies. I had been given this mark by a Pro Fisherman and could see fish trap buoys in the area so was feeling quite confident that I would soon be getting bites.. WRONG, had 3 or 4 drift around the area for nothing. OK, next spot, so motored over to Foul Ground, this time I decided to drop a reef pick rather than drift. Down go 2 rods again. Within what seemed like only a few minutes I felt a decent bite. I could tell from the way the rod was kicking that I was on to the target species, a Snapper. Up it came and into the boat. Only problem it was pretty small. Barely 30cm so back it went, I was after his Daddy. Next bite was a Morwong, gave a decent kick coming up but not as hard as the Snapper. Again it was quite small so back it went. Then the Pike started, first one in I filleted and started using as bait, the next 4 or 5 I threw back. Greedy buggers were even eating their mate. As the Pike seemed to have settled in and were stripping every bait I put down in was time to move on. This time to a spot over Long Reef. One of the days highlights was seeing a whale blowing in the distance and as I got closed a huge whale come up, it's back out of the water, a wonderful sight and one I never tire of. Got to the mark, anchored up and got the 2 rods in. This time I was in around 30m of water so also threw a soft plastic out the back to drift around. caught a Sargent Baker so filleted him for bait. Then waited and waited and waited, nothing but little nippers stealing my bait on every drop. Time for another move. Final spot was The Wall off Long Reef, there was another boat there who said that he was getting a few rat Kings so expectations were high that I might finally get a decent fish. After a short time I felt the rod load up so started pulling. It would just not move and figured that I had snagged the bottom, so locked up the drag and tried to rip myself free. Hang on the bottom is starting to move, what have I got! ! ! After a short by very heavy fight I see a huge Wobbegong, the biggest I have ever caught. Managed to get him onto the boat, hook out and back he went to terrorise some other poor fisho. It was around then that the wind started to pick up a bit, until then it had been a glamour day, so decided to call it quits and headed back towards the Harbour. Final attempt to land a fish was to troll a couple of lures from Manly round North Head. Did not get a touch. All in all it was not the most successful days fishing but the weather had been great and any day out on the boat is a good day. I'll keep trying as I want to catch some decent Snapper and be able to post pictures like Scratchie. 🙂 Hopeful my next post will be accompanied by pictures of Huge Snapper. Tight line all.
    8 points
  50. Thanks raiders been a tough 2 months losing both parents but now the fish will be biting all day long up there. regards Swordie
    7 points
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