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Showing content with the highest reputation on 07/16/2021 in all areas

  1. Hope this helps you visualise how I hold a Luderick rod - the line of course is wire so the camera picks it up Rod under armpit held between thumb and index finger , line between index finger and middle finger and then running around ring finger to the spool . The ring finger stops line from dropping off the back of the spool and is also used to stop the spool spinning on the strike , the line can be trapped between the middle finger and index finger if needed . Right hand to strip line or spin the spool to pick up any slack line after a mend.
    4 points
  2. Hi raiders, Seeing that so many raiders struggle to catch fish during winter I'm going to post a couple of my favourite spots for those interested and those who fish the Hacking. 1. South Lilli Pilli drop off- On the southern side of Lilli Pilli sand bar there's a drop-off that is my number one spot. It drops of from about 1.5m to 10m. I regularly fish this drop of in all moths of the year and have luck most of the time. This can be said for most drop-off's but the reason I like this one is because in the shallow water their is numerous weed beds which hold luderick and plenty of baitfish. I often will drift over this spot with a float and a size '12' hook with a bit of bread and will catch Luderick, mullet and even pillies. Anyway, with the amount of bait their I try to match what is their on the day. Sometimes I will see little flicks on the surface indicating that pillies are around. I would then use some pilly and often will hook up to some snapper, trevally and flatties. I have also been on a boat with my friend with live pillies and have caught John Dory their in the winter moths. Another tip that some people may seem weird for this spot is when I hook a small pinkie I don't crank it in so I can get another bait out. Instead I reel it in slowly, as I have had big flathead and John Dory swallow the pinkie but not actually eat it, you will see the fish and it will have the fish in its mouth and when it gets to the boat it just lets it go. Occasionally the bigger fish will come back for a few chews but rarely get hooked. This is my number one spot for using bigger baits and slower live baits such as sweep, mado and trumpeters. 2. Yowie Bay Boat Ramp- This is a spot that can be accessed by land and can be fished from a boat as well. Some people may argue against that but I use a Minn Kota to steer through the moorings. I find cast lures back into the mooring and jetties can produce some big bream and trevally. I've recently started using the Ecogear Zx40 range and have found the brilliant. It is risky using 8 pound line with 10 pound leader next to a jetty/mooring with a $20 lure but you catch some cracking fish. I have also caught a couple of squid around the jetties as well so always keep that in mind. I have caught bream, snapper, tarwhine, trevally, leatherjackets and even a flattie around these moorings/jetties. The vibration of the lure gets the fish active even if the conditions aren't favourable. My gear of choice- Shimano 2500 reel matched with a 1.8m 1.3kg rfexy tip shimano rod. 8 pound mono with 10 pound mono leader Zx40 416, 412 and 411 Bait- Pillies, fresh nippers, prawns and worms Hope this helps! Cheers Isaac CT
    4 points
  3. XD351's outfit sounds good. If you're looking at Alvey rods, I'm hearing some good reports on their new Stealth rod, which if I remember correctly can cast 6 ounces. If you want a quality rod at a reasonable price, take a look at something from Gary Howard's range. There's not a whole lot about them on the net and if you have trouble, PM me and I'll send you a link. You can also contact him personally and ask him for a recommendation.
    4 points
  4. Hey Raiders, This is probably of most interest to those running electric/hydraulic trailer brakes. Just some tips based on my experience in running my rig over 20yrs and what has worked for me. Without a doubt, the ideal scenario to minimise maintenance is to fit stainless steel rotors and callipers to the trailer. However for those of us that don't have that set up we can still get good mileage out of running galvanised callipers and steel rotors with some regular maintenance. My trailer is a 2001 build twin bogey and in that time I have changed 1 failed calliper, changed disc pads 4 times, machined rotors once, and just last November changed the rotors for the first time. A couple of things I do: 1. ensure the calliper sliders have NO grease. No matter what grease I tried it gunks up after a few salt trips causing the callipers to jam up. Now I just spray some silicon lubricant into each slider after each trip - no issues since I have been doing this. 2. Spray WD40 over the rotors, springs, callipers after each salt dunking. I do this in the trailer car park after launching the boat. Only takes a minute to run around with a spray can. Also, spray some Silicon lube in-between the brake pad and the calliper piston. This keeps the pistons lubricated and free of rust residue. Have not had to service the callipers - except to replace the one faulty one under warranty. 3. make sure that when the pads are replaced, the pad shims are NOT fitted. Shims work great on car brakes, they stop the pads rattling and provide some insulation to the pistons, but cars are used way more than boat trailers and cars drive on roads and do not get dunked in salt water regularly so it makes sense to fit them. But boat trailers are different. When I had the rotors replaced last Novembers, I remembered to request no grease on the calliper slides with the threat if I saw grease they will dismantle and clean everything at their expense (despite the mechanic swearing they always grease them and have had no issue). But one thing I had forgotten was to ask for NO shims. Sure enough, they were fitted and when I saw the work, I mentioned this to the mechanic. Again his answer was but we always fit them - we've had no issues - these are new Bendix pads and shims - the shims have a non rust coating they'll be fine. Hmmmm Ok ... I'll give it a go. Anyway, on the second last trip in early July I noticed two of the wheels were warm/hot when we got home. Did the normal washdown after they cooled and a few days later I had the opportunity to pull the tyres off and inspect. This is what I found: \ The shims had dislodged and moved on everyone of the wheels, and on two wheels they were causing the pads to drag. So my conclusion is that with the shims in place, there’s not enough clearance to effectively fresh water flush around the callipers. Salt gets behind the shims and binds them to the callipers or to the pistons. The normal movement of the brakes then progressively dislodges and deforms the shims forcing the pads against the discs. Also some shims rust and expand - again taking up any required clearance for normal operation. I removed all the shims, re-lubed everything and checked for good clearance and movement. Last trip to Parsley bay went without a hitch - arrived there and back home with all 4 wheels cool - trailer braked perfectly - no dramas. Without the shims, the pads may not last as long and the trailer is noisier as the pads rattle around a bit, but I get a good 5yrs between brake pad changes and don’t get stuck on the side of the road with red hot seized brakes. Anyway just sharing these tips that have worked for me. Cheers Zoran
    3 points
  5. As the rain started easing up on Sunday morning, decided to head out for a flick. Stopped at Mac's for some bait - no yabbies in stock so picked up some worms. Set up at a spot just past Shark Park. Sun was out, rods were in and tide was running out. Weather turned quickly and it absolutely bucketed down - lucky there was a tarp shelter nearby. A couple of rods super light, no sinker just worm, prawn or pilchard - no luck. Running sinker size 1 on another, a few small nibbles but no take. Threw the heaviest out, paternoster with chicken and worm and bang! Fish on! Took me a while to reel it in and thought I'd lost it in the seaweed but ended up with a nice size snapper after it took the chicken breast. Stayed another hour or so but no more bites so packed it up for the day. Happy with the catch!
    3 points
  6. Dave. I should have the Scorpion all ready to go by September so I will take you out on the harbor and get you hooked up to some Kingies. Can't guarantee they will be keepers . Frank
    3 points
  7. Roman, If you can wait until this lockdown is over you can buy the MT8144 and 650BC I have - my days of fishing for Mulloway off the beach are long past and the outfit doesn’t get used anymore- never got used much in the first place . Rod is a Wilson with Fuji guides and reel seat - 2 piece . Send me p.m if you are interested .
    3 points
  8. I guess someone thinks 12 is too young to make life choices 🤣😳🤣😂😳 gees I made a lot of life choices at that age - thankfully I survived cheers Zoran
    2 points
  9. After enjoying Scratchie's post about our most memorable fishing experiences, I started thinking about the significant factor that lead to me becoming as "mad-keen" on fishing as I am. In my case it wasn't the catching of a fish, but in fact the losing of one. I was on holidays at Coffs Harbour with my Mum and brother, staying with relatives and we'd gone fishing a few times, mostly to Coffs Jetty, catching mostly tiny sized fish like Yellowtail, Sweep, Mado's and Leatherjackets, all fun but nothing big enough to eat. It was all hand-line fishing at the jetty and I was comfortable using hand-lines, but had just been given my first rod and was keen to try using it. We were staying pretty close to Coffs Creek and had heard from the next door neighbour that there were a "few Flathead down at the swimming spot in the creek", Mum asked me if I wanted to go and try down there for something bigger than the fish at the wharf. I was about 8 years old at the time and had caught plenty of keeping sized fish, but they'd all been caught on hand-lines and mostly from the family boat down at Windang, which is on the northern shore of the entrance to Lake Illawarra. So down to the fish shop -which was only just up from the pathway down to the swimming spot- to buy some more green prawns for bait. My family had relied on only two baits wherever we'd fished, Squirt Worms were number one bait, but good old green prawns were number two and you could get them literally anywhere. I remember the man at the fish shop asking where we were going to go and laughing when Mum replied that we were just going down to the creek, where the swimming spot was. He said there were better spots to go than down there, but undeterred, down we went. The swimming spot consisted of a simple boarded section along the shore, complete with diving board and a narrow bit of wharf at each end, that protruded out about 15 or so meters on each side. These two narrow ends were about a meter wide and sat just above the water at high tide, each one had a small ladder attached about 2/3rd's of the way out and the only purpose of these mini wharves was to allow swimmers back up- they were just too narrow for anything else. We picked the left hand side one and went out to the end, it wasn't wide enough to fish two people side by side and I remember having to be careful getting anything out of the old cane creel we kept all our fishing gear in, as there were no sides on the tiny wharf and there were plenty of gaps between the wooden boards- anything dropped was lost to the creek. My rod and reel had belonged to my Grandfather and were now pretty old. The rod was a Jarvis Walker "Burnie-deluxe" a two piece solid fibreglass rod with a cork butt and black plastic-like foregrip, about five feet long, simple chromed guides and what would be described these days as a "medium-slow taper"- originally designed by Jarvis Walker as a Bream and general purpose model. The reel was one that many older fishers would have either owned or indeed seen- a "Steelite" centrepin- still used by many for Luderick fishing. To cast the line, the only way I could figure out was to pull some line off the reel and then make the throw, hoping the line didn't get caught on anything like the wharf, gear or myself. The rig was the same one I used for everything, anywhere I fished; a bug sinker which sat on half a match stick, about 7 or 8 inches above the hook. Swivels were not commonly used and it seemed that most fishers used a match stick tied on to stop the sinker sitting on the hook. There were only about 3 types of hook I'd ever seen, Suicide (called Octopus pattern these days) Long Shank (bronzed) and "Limerick" which were tinned and known as "Tailor hooks". Our long shanks came in different sizes in a pack and on the back of the packet there was a description of how many of each size and what they were used for. Mine had "Garfish hooks", "Whiting hooks" and "Flathead hooks" in it, the Flathead hooks were the largest and I chose the second largest one and tied it on. After fishing out of the boat at Windang for a few years, my idea of a prawn bait was to peel the prawn, throw away the head and break the prawn into about 3 or 4 bits, each bit was a bait and only needed to cover the bend of the hook and the point- using an entire prawn was just not even a consideration! The fish always took the whole bait and pretty much you'd strike as soon as you felt something there- well that's how I did it anyway. Rigged up, bait on and cast made- probably went about 15 feet, if that, let out a bit of line so it would sink as far out as possible. Take up the little bit of slack after it hit the bottom and a bite straight away! Pulling back against the bite and the rod starts bending- there's a fish hooked and kicking on the other end! Excitedly I wind the fish in, not giving it any line and up comes a small Flathead, I lift it onto the wharf and Mum covers it with the "fishing towel" before putting it in the creel to unhook. Thrilled at catching the fish on rod and reel, I remember just sitting there looking at it as it kicked around in the big creel, it was big enough to keep and I was over the moon. "Come on, catch another one" says Mum and I take the second piece of prawn I've lined up and put it on the hook. Pull some line off the reel and cast again, probably didn't go as far as the first one though as I out-threw the piled up line and it jerked back towards me. Down it goes and another bite straight away- hooked up again and this one's pulling harder. Another Flathead about the same size as the first gets lifted onto the wharf and straight into the creel for unhooking. I love this rod fishing! Fish unhooked and bait on, another cast, another bite, but missed him this time. Mum suggests trying a bigger bit of prawn "for a bigger fish"- makes sense, so out goes half a prawn and pretty well straight away in comes another Flattie. I'm thinking this is a great fishing spot and it was really nice of the neighbour to send us to his secret place. Then it happened, I cast out again expecting another Flathead and I hooked onto something huge! The little rod was bending over and Mum's yelling "play it, play it"- I didn't know what play it meant until she said "let it run- just let go of the reel and put your hand underneath the reel" which I did. The fish would run out a fair way, then seem to stop and I'd reel it back in, only to have it take off again. This went on for ages until the fish was tired and then suddenly it came all the way in and revealed itself- an absolutely giant Flathead. Now how to land it? There was nowhere to beach it- the wooden surrounds of the spot prevented this and the huge fish had pretty much stopped swimming, the only thing to do was try to slide it up onto the wharf. We got it about halfway on and the line broke- it had finally been sawed off by the fish's teeth and it slipped back off the wharf and was gone. We looked at each other and both kept staring at the water for a minute, but off course, it was gone for good. Mum offered the encouragement of "quick, put another hook on, there might be another one!", so I tied on another hook, re-baited and cast again, almost expecting another giant to take hold, but that was it, not another bite and we decided to go home, with the promise of coming back down the next morning. When we got back to the house where we were staying, my cousins were there, including two a bit older than me, no amount of convincing from me mattered, nobody believed how big the Flathead that got away was. "Typical fisherman's story" and the like were the responses and I remember being both frustrated and angry that nobody believed me, even with Mum as witness. The next day we went back there to fish again, but there were heaps of people swimming and didn't get a bite. The day after 6 of us boys made a raft and sailed Coffs Creek, which took us quite a few hours to do the 1km stretch and I kept looking over the side the whole way, hoping to see "my" Flathead. Something triggered in me that day and just like Scratchie with his huge Bream, I was hooked for life, except he got to keep his fish and mine got away. Over the years I've seen some giant Flathead caught, mostly by others, but I've never seen one like that one ever again. I did see the "lay" of an absolute giant up at Wooli when we were there while the Sydney Olympics were on and although you can't tell the weight of one from a sand impression, it was bigger I reckon than the one I fought and it made me smile to see where it had been, knowing there still are giants out there to be caught. I have a few more stories of lost giants, but I'd love to hear of other folks experiences, albeit losses, and to see if losing something has motivated others to get more involved (addicted even!) with fishing.
    2 points
  10. It is worth visiting that shop in Moaning Vale. Reasonable prices. Widest tackle choice on Northern Beaches. Nicest sales staff. They used to sell Alvey reels. I presume they still might have low mount rods. May be give them a call?
    2 points
  11. The missus heard me yelling at the T.V. about the refs calls. 🤣 That is why she watches from the upstairs T.V., and not with me.
    2 points
  12. G'day Raiders, Given many of us are experiencing lockdown keeping us from our favourite pass time, I thought I'd put up this report to keep the fires stoked. Some of you may know that Maria has arthritis issues in her hands and has already had one surgery, so getting her to even contemplate the prospect of fishing in 50-60m grounds on cold winter days is somewhat challenging. So a few months back I hatched a plan that for her birthday I would equip her with a small electric reel+rod combo that would ease her struggles. Here's the gear: the electric reel and 10-15kg rod weigh in at just over 700g .... compared with 980g for just the Penn 950SSM reel she struggled with previously. So the next step to getting a YES, was to propose we do gentlemen's hours for winter's days. So the Thursday 8th July session was a very respectable 8.30am departure from home, heading to Parsley Bay and then out to Barrenjoey Wide (strictly observing all of the COVID regulations current at that time). She was so stoked with the new fishing arrangement she even took the helm as we left Parsley Bay leaving me free to set up all the rods, bait and gear. 10am saw us out at our favourite 50m drift, the conditions were mildly bumpy but settling by the minute. Good bait and fish readings on the sounder so in went the lines...we'll in went Maria's electric as that was the first one baited up ... and before I could get a bait on mine let alone get it in the water this happens: So first fish in the boat, a barracoutta ... excellent, plenty of fresh bait, should be a great day .... But then along comes a run of whales, many humpbacks, a southern wright and several false killers. Two hump backs swimming side by side, each back easily bigger than my BARRYCUDA heading straight for us, 3 boat lengths out they dive, luckily all lines were in, Maria and I grab the rocket launcher rails and brace.... nothing... wait ... nothing...breathe... still nothing... they're gone. Phew. Back to fishing. Nope.... more whales .... here's the cheeky bugger that hung around for 15min ... tail slapping the full time... apologies for poor camera just using the iphone here. Anyway, back to fishing, cause I guess you all want the fishing report ...so fishing 10.00am -1.30pm we caught 6 flathead (45-57cm), 3 x tailor (35cm), 1 pike (50cm), 1 barracutta, 1 squire (released), a 4ft mako shark (bitten off at boat - took snapper lead, plastic and hook), a 4ft Port Jackson (released), and 1 horse yakka. ...and before anyone asks Maria caught 5 out of the 6 flatties, the mako, the pike 😳 ... YES the electric is a hit ! Raced back to the ramp to clean the fish and we were done and dusted heading home by 3.00pm. Kept fillets off the pike, yakka, tailor and barracutta to salt down for future bait. Here was todays flathead fillet lunch Hope this keeps the passion alive. Tight lines raiders. Cheers Zoran the mako, the pike
    1 point
  13. Another vote for the raw kingfish but Im pretty picky on how thin it has to be cut. Smoked a coupe last week that I still haven't gotten through. Cherry, apple and peach wood are my favourite for smoking fish.
    1 point
  14. I wouldn’t be surprised if Freddy was just blooding Moses in so he has more options next year if Cleary is injured -best time to do it when you have won the series ! if it was one a piece I think he would have gone with Reynolds and walker .
    1 point
  15. pulp fiction scooby doo deliverance gran torino
    1 point
  16. Batman. Some Ford brand car with Eastwood. Grand Torino, I think. Not sure about the others
    1 point
  17. This time of year they move down to the brackish water to breed and I think the closed season may have started. Some do remain in the fresh and may also be stopped from migrating by weirs etc. Ron
    1 point
  18. Have a look at the Windsor bait and tackle YouTube channel , Aaron does quite a bit of fishing in there from the Meadowbank ferry wharf up to lake parramatta . No monsters but a bit of fun catching bream flatties and the odd bass upstream from the parra ferry terminal.
    1 point
  19. That is not true. There are quizzes in Fun Trivia for kids starting age 6!
    1 point
  20. Can’t understand why ? What’s the difference in playing this and watching who wants to be a millionaire or sale of the century! Must be some archaic law or something .
    1 point
  21. squid, squid and more squid!
    1 point
  22. Welcome aboard. Contact @DerekD on the Forum. He is the Guru in your part of the world and he will help you. Cheers.
    1 point
  23. beer batter with chips is pretty good
    1 point
  24. 2 on 1 against Ponga. Ponga is ALWAYS going to go for the ball, not the tackle. Should've been a dummy and score under the posts.
    1 point
  25. 100% agree. I think snapper are overrated as a table fish. Way too easy to overcook them and dry them out. Would much prefer a nice fresh bream. Rub whole fish in olive oil, season skin with plenty of salt, then cooked whole over charcoals, 10mins per side. So simple, so moist, so tasty. Cant beat it.
    1 point
  26. Hi, I cast left handed but reel in right handed. Hold the bottom grip of your rod in your left armpit with your left hand holding the grip above the reel. The rod tip should be pointing in line with your float. I use my left middle finger to support the line coming off the reel and my right hand feeding line out manually. This is never a problem unless the drift is very fast. Just the same, line can still come off and slip under the reel but that’s more likely a problem if the spool is spinning too fast. To counter that, ensure the spool is touching your chest and it acts as a brake. Another cause can be line that is not firmly wound onto the reel so that loops easily pop up and slide off the spool. Be sure when retrieving your float to wind on line with some tension and evenly across the width of the spool. The other cause for this is being distracted! KB
    1 point
  27. I got both rods, prevail is quite flexible compared to the surf which is stiff and more powerful. there is also the diawa sensor sandstorm which is also a great rod for the same price as a prevail. caught some great fish of both rods but I do prefer the surf for beaches and prevail for rocks as they arnt as fragile as a surf
    1 point
  28. Not a fan of this raw fish stuff, can't beat properly cooked.
    1 point
  29. Cheap insurance and keep them charged great report Zoran
    1 point
  30. Only way to eat kingfish is with soy sauce.
    1 point
  31. You are correct there. NSW did not have the killer instinct ALL of the time. Also missing Nathan Cleary.
    1 point
  32. good idea, although, with mine, I take all batteries out, as i can, and charge them that nigh tor next day and top up charge ready for trip out. Ive used Vaseline on the terminals on my DIY battery pack for the trolling motor.
    1 point
  33. If Turbo holds that ball instead of trying to pass, we win! I think that Fittler got the halves wrong and should have went with Walker and Reynolds. That would have been a better combination and allowed Mitchell and Turbo to get early ball. Would also link Cook and Murray. Good to see QLD turn up to play but NSW should never have lost to that team! 🤷‍♂️🤷‍♂️🤷‍♂️
    1 point
  34. I did not know they are specializing in BDSM now 🤣.
    1 point
  35. Great story and so well written Waza ! Enjoyed it thoroughly. Brought back so many childhood memories. Thank you. My got away story is really bitter sweet. I grew up fishing chipping norton lakes. Handlines and the cheapest rod/reels I could scrounge. Some I even made them from car antennas and the plastic spool that the mono line was sold on. We made do. Anyway, for my 12th birthday I received a present : a brown cork grip handle 7ft berkley bream rod, chrome guides and matched with a Diawa eggbeater spinning reel. It was my pride and joy. Had to wait a couple of weeks to use it due to school exams, weather etc etc. The rod slept in my bedroom tempting me every minute of every day. During the wait, I made myself what I considered to be a perfect Y rod holder... so now I could fish the chippie bank in style. This just increased my excitement. Then finally the day came when everything lined up and I actually got to go down to my favourite spot - the west bank about 50m from a boat ramp where there was a small section of sandy beach area. Baited up and cast in. Sat the rod in its holder. Turned around to move my bait and tackle box a bit further up when ....whoooosh ... a YELLOW powerboat raced past about 10m from shore ... ping ... in shot my pride and joy combo ... I could see it for a fraction of a sec as it disappeared into deep the water. My whole virgin combo had "got away" on its maiden trip. I waved frantically but the boat was gone. I could hear it roar up toward Warwick Farm ..... What idiot runs his powerboat 10m from the bank when there was the the whole lake to open up and test his throttle .... B#(&^^^*^ST@D !!!! POSER !!!!!!! Anyway, he did a few more run bys ... maybe thought that I was cheering him on .... 🤯 I packed up and started the walk home ... my head down. I was beaten. But when I climbed back up to the road, I caught a final view of the YELLOW boat ... the motor up, the guy leaning over the back trying to remove 150yards of very new berkley 12lb mono bunched around his prop. A small condolence for me. Anyway, that's one of my most heartfelt "one that got away" fishing stories. Cheers Zoran
    1 point
  36. Bream my personal favourite
    1 point
  37. I have taken Val out into the lakes a couple of times and she sits back in a relaxed mood and reads a book, she did catch an ocky once. Frank
    1 point
  38. great, ill bring the boat, and we may as well get an early start out your way 😂
    1 point
  39. I’ve had several buddies suggest we target Jewies and Flatties in the Hawkesbury or Kingies in the harbour and being really keen to get out, but wanting to comply with restrictions, I got in touch with the local police about fishing Wisemans / Berrowra areas. Their reply was along the lines that you may only use the closest municipal ramp to you residential address, (which for me is Windsor boat ramp). I asked if I could put in at Windsor and run down to Wisemans / Lower Portland, which is a long run, but hey it’s an opportunity to go fishing. Their reply was - You may then only travel a maximum of 10kms from the ramp, if you do not comply with these conditions and you are noticed you risk a minimum $1000 fine. They also stressed that member of the public are submitting photographs that ARE being followed up and fines are being issued on the basis of verifiable photos. I’d hate for any Raiders to get fined or not doing the right thing - it’s just not worth it.
    1 point
  40. That's what we need in lockdown...a few Waza stories! It kind of brings back memories of my own childhood, my parents dragging around a fishing mad kid to indulge my addiction. I can totally relate to losing a fish making you keener. I find all of truly fun things in life require two ingredients; mastery and a little bit of luck. Fishing is no exception! My one that got away story involves the massive silver drummer in the lagoon at Lord Howe Island. As a 13 year old, I had just discovered the amazing properties of lighter line so a 1-3kg rod and an ABU cardinal with 1kg Maxima came on the trip with me. The outfit was used to catch a feed of the plentiful garfish off the wharf every day, but whenever I got bored, I would float out a piece of bread to the ever obliging drummer. Invariably, the drummer would strip 50-100m of line off my reel and there would be nothing I could do about it, and sooner or later the line would break. I tried using 4kg mono but the drummer wouldn't have anything of it, skirting about the hook on the 4kg line and then nailing my 1kg presentation next cast. One day I went off on my own in pursuit of drummer again, and hooked a fish I actually could turn. When it came up, it was a painted block wrasse. Google up a photo. What a beautiful fish. But being completely alone that day and high above the water on the wharf, I couldn't land this either. I did get a really good look at it before it swam off and the feeling of gratitude at having seen such a beautiful fish somewhat soothed the disappointment of losing it. My dad took me out on a trip with a local guide going for double headers in the lagoon. That's a story for another day. When lockdown ends, I'll go over and get the photo. We tried to go there for our honeymoon some years ago and were gobsmacked at how much it cost to go there. Having just bought a house it just wasn't on the cards. Which just made me all the more fortunate and grateful for my parents having taken me there. Hopefully I'll be back one day.
    1 point
  41. Nice fish ! Have you tried up in the creek ?
    1 point
  42. Even the fish know to stay home........
    1 point
  43. My thoughts on heavily fished locations (take this as you will) leave the Prawns and Squid in the freezer, buy a Nipper pump and pump some for bait, use as light a line as you're comfortable with, and little or no sinker, try various tides until it starts to make sense (it will) fish structure, whether that's a few rocks, a jetty or a gutter in the sand.
    1 point
  44. HI Check out Schroom on Tube .This young man has good tips on the Bream lures etc.
    1 point
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