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Showing content with the highest reputation on 10/10/2021 in all areas

  1. As per usual it was a late start getting on the water for me, after 10am. I was quite surprised by the swell once I got out through the bar as it had looked pretty flat form land!!! I ended up getting side tracked by a family of whales, which after a while became pretty curious in my boat, in fact at one point I copped a soaking from one!!! There were whales around me all day at every spot I fished, though getting a few decent shots was proving as hard as the fishing. By the time I actually got my first soft plastic in the water it was after 1pm but none the less first drop resulted in a pan sized snapper. Decided to try and upload to the gone fishing day app but struggled as it seemed to want me to do a live video!!!! Second drop resulted in another red, only this was a sergeant baker, from there on I couldn't hook another fish until around 5pm. With a brisk breeze picking up I decided to anchor as my drift was to fast even using reverse to slow the drift. Two more snaps had dinner sorted before banjo rays and shovel nosed sharks took over the the next hour. I needed up using a 3ft kids rod with a 2000 reel with 8lb braid to make the action seem more fun. Ended up being a fun session even if the catch wasn't so good but gee standing in a centre console all day with choppy seas takes it out of you.
    7 points
  2. Raiders thanks for being model citizens of our community - a big thanks to all. Tomorrow do all your usual pre fishing checks and add masks and a check of restrictions for the area you live in. Have proof of vaccination available for inspection. We are all looking forward to reading some fishing reports with lots of pics of raiders with big grins displaying their captures.
    7 points
  3. Well done @Scratchie Some sound advice on your write up in the Nautilus Marine magazine!
    5 points
  4. Was heading out with my mate to Bate Bay this arvo, but he bailed so I headed out myself this morning. Plenty of spikies at first, then a couple of just legal blue spots until I drifted out a bit past Kurnell, where I found a couple of better ones. When I hit deeper water, the rig was bitten off above the swivel, no bite so probably a jacket. Fortunately no others. Only 1 fish in the deeper water, so headed back in a bit and found a couple more, then headed home with my limit. The biggest at 54cm. Early on, the wind and swell was short and sharp from the N/E, left over from yesterday. Wind will be chopping it up again later on.
    4 points
  5. g'day, went out last night, this time land based for jews at a spot I scouted out after looking on google earth thoroughly. 2nd time fishing here, first time we went was mostly for scouting, but did drop a fish right on the shoreline a few weeks ago. This time we pull out one of the smallest jews I have caught coming in at a whopping 49cm. Quick pics and safely released him. Caught - 10/10/2021, 1:40am, (high tide 12:43am), Weather was calm, partly cloudy and fair. Whole semi fresh squid on snelled 9/0 and 7/0 Mate also dropped a nice fish as the tide turned which sucked (his drag was loose). 2 trips and caught jews on both trips. stoked.
    3 points
  6. The thing is though is if you dont catch anything with the Lunds on the day if you look after it you could eat it when you get home. Its actually a food grade product as far as I am aware, people just use it for bait because its that good!
    2 points
  7. G’day raiders, I’ve been pretty quiet lately just sorting a few things out and with the restrictions means Broughton is off limits. There’s plenty of areas still to fish but the ocean going spots south are not productive this time of year. So today, me and the eldest thought we’d go back to basics and chase a few flatties in the bay. We really struggled to find them on the run up tide and the wind didn’t help our drifts either. So the call was made to change areas and fish the back half of the bay. We were targeting a good area with some nice drop offs as the tide turned but still couldn’t find any takers. Two drifts for zero but I knew the area had fish. So we pushed in a bit closer to shore and first cast the boy was on. Then again but a decent one. Then again and my day was looking bleak. Next drift however was my turn and I loaded up to a ripper that wanted my lure and swallowed it completely. Then I managed another couple and the score was 3 all. We did one more drift as the tide was now receding quickly but unfortunately no more takers and we called it a day! Always fun to get out on the water with your kids. Home by 1pm and a couple of fish cooked and eaten, with a big smile on our faces! Can’t ask for more than that! Thanks for reading, cheers scratchie!!!
    2 points
  8. Thanks Donna for your leadership over this time and also our fellow raiders who have done the right thing. I’ve certain learned a thing or two from this community over the recent months…and not just about fishing. We’ve still got a way to go with this covid business, but at least we’re almost at the point we can all go for a fish again! Looking forward to seeing some reports. Especially the ones where fish have been caught on home made plastics and other equipment crafted during lockdown!
    2 points
  9. 🙄🙄🙄 He probably caught & released 10 times that number of undersized to get 5 keepers. A mate & I fished the hacking once & between the 2 of us we caught 150 squire in 4 hours & we did not bring a fish home!! Biggest was about 26cm. There are millions of them in there!!! Taking just legal fish wont hurt overall fish numbers, that's what the size & bag limits are for. If the DPI were to find that the size limit should be increased as they have done with other species then so be it. Until them 30cm is 30cm.
    2 points
  10. Like lots of raiders do you can use fishraider to “diarise” trips and captures. You can use the gallery here to keep pics. Perhaps add a tag to these posts so you can search quicker. Deckee app has a Trips function. It tracks your journey and you can make notes. Pics are an example of a Hairtail outing last year. In notes I put the link to the post I made in fishraider. Of course there is the old exercise book and pen and paper. I have only ever caught mulloway on plastics in the Cooks River. Good luck with your quest and thanks for the post.
    2 points
  11. Alrighty, a pretty action packed trip last night! Got out a bit later then I would've liked and paddling over to where I was fishing took a little bit longer then expected. Arrived at around 8.15pm and sounded out the bottom and decided to anchor on a river bend on the edge of a drop off which drops from 2.5 down to 6-7 meters not to far from Alfred's point bridge First rod - a whole pille/ mullet strips with a heaver sinker second rod - whole fresh squid, set up with a small sinker and I would open the bail arm every 5 mins to let it drift with current both rods had 14 pound leader/ 20lb braid to begin with Had a third rod to try and catch some of mullet or tailor which came close to my burly bag, while putting bread on the hook my rod with squid over and take a few meters of moderately tight drag, i grab the rod and as soon as tension was applied the line cut - bullshark Upgraded leader to 20lb and threw out another whole squid also replaced the pilchard with a fresh mullet strip 9.40pm rolls around and i put my second jacket on, as I sit back down my rod with squid buckle's and the drag is flying off, this run easily took 75meters of line and I'm thinking of when is it going to cut me off, then the famous run ends, and dead weight until under the kayak where I loosen the drag and i finally feel those big thumping headshakes and it makes a few small runs. I tangle with my other line somehow but the fish is on the surface, a few attempts netting it. finally goes in, my god, its big. Colossal tangles in the net and a large jew taking up the entire deck of the kayak, I sat there looking at it in awe, spent a stupid amount of time cutting lines, untangling the net and struggling the even lift the slimy basted of the deck never alone release it without flipping the kayak, I knew it was too late, the fish would release poorly so I made the decision to put it out of its misery and eat my first ever jew. Im a catch and release guy, but if i do get a feed I like to keep the slightly above legal models and leave the big ones for someone else to catch, my only regret of the night is not trying to release it and not taking so long just looking at the fish, trying to measure it and also untangling the net. The fish was 104cm, stoked to have cracked the meter. took it over to Georges river national park where I fillet the fish, some for me and some for the neighbour and gave the other half of the fish to a group of boys fishing for jews along the shoreline there. Forgot the fish had a tag, hopefully they see it and know what to do with it, as it was still in the fish. So, a few lessons learnt, all of which is handling the fish. That is basically loosing myself once I netted the fish and having no idea what to do next, even though I did I just went... blank. space restrictions on the kayak meant that handling a large fish like this was extremely difficult. Hopefully everyone who I have given some fish to make good use of it. I would've loved to have entered to tag data but silly me didn't even see the fish had a tag till I was scaling it. Should've take then numbers right then and there Here's the picture and its final measurement 104cm, caught 9:55pm on a whole fresh squid just after the change of the tide which was at 9:05pm, Georges river, near Alfred's point bridge. Not sure when the next trip is, but ill still post my journeys here.
    2 points
  12. Ive noticed a bit of interest from a few folk on the site about metal lures and using them for chasing pelagics-SO -i thought id write a bit of a story on chucking heavy metal and techniques/tackle etc. A Bit of History I started being interested in lure fishing in my early teens. I grew up in Castle Hill so not near the water and with non fishing parents . We did however go on fairly regular holidays to North Avoca where I started catching a few tailor of the beach on pillies and mullet. One Xmas hols i took a walk down to South Avoca "to see where the big fish lived" and was standing with my precious beach rod (A Daiwa GS9 and Rod that was a birthday present) at "Mugs Rock" catching rod cod in the sun . Suddenly a bloke ran up onto the rock with a Seascape festooned rod and yelled at me " have you got a lure kiddo,get one on and cast it out"-i dug into my tackle box and pulled out my one and only lure-a red sparkly Halco slice-30 or 35 grams (Waza will remember them), carefully tied it on with a crappy store bought wire trace and cast it out as far as i could (i was a bit of a twig as a kid so im guessing 30 meters). The bloke with the Seascape suddenly had a bent rod and "wham" so did i . The hit on the lure was life altering (as you will see)- and after what seemed an eternity i had what is still the biggest tailor i have ever caught flopping beside the rocks- Seascape man was still fighting what turned out to be a large striped tuna. He talked me through washing the chopper up and i doubt i wiped the smile off my face for about 6 months . I never weighed that fish but it was around the 8lb mark-and i still havent caught one bigger in the 38 years ive fished since! This fish (and watching Seascape man in action) started an addiction ive never beaten-just modified with time and circumstance. For me a good fish on a fast moving metal is as good as a marlin on the short corner or sight fishing a trout. The physical effort , the violent strike followed by head shakes and the inevitable hard run never lose their shine as far as im concerned and probably never will. What Happened Next I was only 14 when i caught that tailor and remained pretty limited with transport and funds but like any addiction i wanted more. We continued to holiday at Nth Avoca and i managed to get a small rod and reel combo as my next fishing present -we had a family friend who worked for Capstan Plastics who had stopped manufacturing reels by that stage but had an agency for Diawa. The reel was a Black Diamond 1300 and held about 200 meters of 6lb nylon-but most importantly -it had a 5-1 gear ratio and had SPEED. By this stage i was getting up before dawn-walking 2km down the beach to Sth Avoca and had learnt a bit about bonito and rat kings and had caught bugger all . I had a few mini metals by now and a couple of the legendary 1/2x1/4's but didnt realise that my GS9 was way too slow . That all changed one amazing January day (i was 16 i think) when the sea in front of the Avoca platform became a boiling mass of frigate mackeral and underneath bonito. That day i caught my first tuna species (frigates) and then the following day finally a couple of bonito-i had started to learn the art of landing fast fish off the rocks on light tackle . Spinning with 6lb mono off the rocks taught me very quickly about side pressure and rod angles-especially with a 6ft light spin stick. From here the addiction just got deeper, i soon realised that the GS9 wasnt cutting it and saved up the $99 (a lot in 1983 ) for a Mitchell 499 -the fastest reel on the planet and spooled it with 20lb mono and paired it with a Snyder FT 70-120 built by John Bell from Dee Why Sports -after i read in Fishing World that he was the best rod builder in Sydney (when such things mattered!!!). I caught a lot of bonito on that combo and will come back to it soon. The first really decent fish i caught came next on my little Diawa Black Diamond. It was the last few days of the old August school holidays 1984 and through some family friends we had gained access to a house at Mackeral Beach on Pittwater AND the house came with a 14 ft Quinnie and a 15 hp Evinrude-I had a boat!!! I was there with my mother and a mate from school (who wasnt a fisho but was happy to explore). On the 3rd September 1984 we started the day early in the usual morning mist and headed up the river and mucked around at Juno point , Flint and Steel then went up Patonga Creek (my first bar crossing i suppose). We had hot chips for lunch from Patonga and then crossed back over to West Head in the afternoon towards the top of the tide . ....and then i saw huge silver bullets broaching the top of the water in pods of 10 or more fish-TUNA. They were big mack tuna making the long forgotten spring run (there are plenty of old stories of them pushing up as far as the rail bridge in dry years) smashing microscopic bait. They werent worried by the boat at all, the only other boat nearby was a cruiser that tried to troll the schools for a few minutes then left. I tried a 1/2x1/4 on my 499 , then switched to a Halco slice, then (by then i knew the principle of "keep going smaller until you get the bite") to my "little rod" and a small slice, then a wonder wobbler, then finally-i had two brand new unused 15 gm Juro shiners in my very understocked box. I drove the boat up to the next bust up, killed the motor (this becomes important later....) and cast. 1,2, 3 cranks of the handle and whack....Im on and a run like id never experience before and ping....its gone, along with the lure. I looked into the tackle box and picked up the other Shiner. I had read about doubles and their importance in sportfishing-so try not to laugh. I tied a spiders hitch and looped the final shiner onto the double . Same procedure as before, drive up, kill the motor, cast, wind and whack. Line started screaming off the reel and within seconds i was down to half a spool and i was screaming at my very stunned mate "start the engine"-"how do i do that"-"pull the bloody cord", "right what do i do now"-DRIVE THAT WAY. So we drove after the fish and it fought and fought and fought. Just as the sun disappeared behind the Broken Bay hills the fish came to the surface about 15 meters from the boat and circled us. I had a gaff and a prawn net on board. My mate was totally unwilling to try the gaff so when it did its next circle he stuck the prawn net in front of its head . Fortunately the fish was stuffed (so was i) and the net broke as i tried to lift it but i had the fish by the tail. I hooked it just off west head and landed it about 2 kms to the north of Lion Island close to an hour after hookup. We drove back to Mackeral Beach in an orange seascape where it was hard to tell the difference between the water and the sky. I weighed the fish a few days later at home on some dodgy bathroom scales and then again on someone elses dodgy bathroom scales. It went 18lbs cleaned and i later learned would of been a Junior World Record for 6lb line if id been an ANSA or GFAA member at the time. After this the addiction was incurable . I spent weekends playing cricket on Saturdays and fishing the rocks on Sundays . When cricket was over i just fished.The eggbeaters got replaced with overheads (çause thats what real fishos used) . First a Seascape and then for many, many years a Shimano Speedmaster IV. A Butterworth FSU 4120 became my big stick of choice and loaded with 20 or 25 lb Maxima i felt i could catch just about anything from Sydney and the rock platforms to the north. From the rocks i spun up bonnies,kings,striped,mack,longtail tuna, spottie macks , hooked a hell of a big yellowfin one day at North Whale (an utter smoking) , trevally, snapper, bream , flathead (yep), frigates (still a light tackle fav of mine, especially at Terrigal ), the odd GT further north , a couple of amberjack from the rocks at Noosa. I livebaited too but never loved livebaiting like i loved high speed spinning. When i finally had a boat of my own (and still to today) i never left port without a spin stick rigged with a metal. I still use them all the time and from the boat have caught all the tuna's (except a Southern Blue), jewfish, kings, Spanish,spottie ,school mackeral, bonnies by the thousand,salmon (of course) ,tailor and even trout in the fresh etc etc. I still have some goals with metals-i would really like to spin up a wahoo (but as a few mates could testify-i dont catch wahoo, i just gaff them for other people) and ive spun up a couple of cobia on soft plastics but would again love to get one on metal. In part 2 i will go into lures/species tackle and techniques. I will also go into what makes a spot fire for pelagics-especially for some of the land based younger guys. Pelagic fish have patterns and understanding those patterns will help prevent a lot of wasted effort
    1 point
  13. G'day raiders, For as long as I can remember I have always wanted to be able to catch a quality jewie, a quality jewie for me is ticking of a 1m specimen. And I'm going to document my more serious trips here when going for jewies. I also want to be able to target & catch them more constantly when I do fish for them. I have caught 3 Jewfish ever all of which around that 60-70cm mark, and ill be taking a more open approach on them, as the trips I have been doing aren't working. Ill be using a more logical and simple way of targeting them which is basically bait & structure = fish. I hope this post will assist in others to being able to catch these fish. Anyway. the methods I have been using previously for jewies has been - a social day with mates throwing a rod out and waiting for a fish to come take the bait - allowing the fish to "run" with the bait when they initially take the bait, I have lost quite a few fish doing this - fishing spots (in the Georges) on a run out tide where the current is screaming - using baits like squid in areas where squid aren't ever seen I will be using a simple way of going for jew's now on, for example using bait that's in the area, perhaps even catching it myself, never really targeted poddie mullet but ill be willing to learn. Using squid in a place like Revesby is silly in my opinion as no squid are seen up there, jewies will still eat it, but if your using a bait that the jewfish are targeting they will be more inclined to eat that then a squid that was caught at yowie bay boat ramp the previous night. This dose apply to all fish but I reckon more so on jewfish, its like throwing a halco 30g slug in a school of tiny bait a school of hesitant kings are feeding on, they are usually quite focused on feeding on the small baitfish. Bad example I know but you get it. But if I am short of time I will still defiantly use baits like squid in the upper areas of the Georges as they will defiantly still eat it, especially if bait is a bit scarce. Now, the problem with the Georges rivers main channel. so, from what I understand is jewfish tend to be a bit more active on the slack tides, which I do understand as it is less effort to hunt your dinner. Spots like Cpt cook bride, tom uglys and Como bridge, although they do produce I have never pulled one out from these spots. They also have very strong current during the outgoing tide and when the slack tide comes all the bait isn't going to suddenly appear there, which means the only jewfish that would go to spots like these would only be passing by or to search for bait during the slack tide. Even though these spots have great structure and eddies they are heavily fished, and wouldn't be a spot to consistently catch them as they would only be there for ~30 mins. Every time a mate says "lets fish captain's" I know I'm going to catch nothing. So, my new approach for jewfish is to focus areas where there is less water volume moving, and find structure that would hold bait during the outgoing tide which would be areas of less tidal movement. So I'm thinking of places like - Kograh bay / Carss park - Towards the mouth of Oatley bay - Jewfish bay - salt pan creek - west of salt pan in Georges I have never fished to hard these areas on the kayak or land based, so it will be a bit of work locating holes or finding structure that would hold bait. Structure I'll be looking for is holes/channels, Moorings, Marinas, rocky shorelines or channel markers if I'm desperate. When I do find the a spot which meets the requirements, ill mostly be fishing about 30 mins before the top of the tide then about 3 hrs of the outgoing tide as I believe the outgoing tide carry's a lot more food for them to ambush while they sit in the protected areas of current especially in the upper areas of the Georges. In areas where there isn't much water volume moving I don't think tide would matter that much, this would include areas like the upper reaches of Oatley bay, Kograh bay & saltpan. I will fish mostly at night because of the jetski and boat traffic in the Georges is annoying. . I think jewfish are quite overlooked and a simpler approach to them may prove successful, but I may also be overlooking them by sitting down and looking at the Georges river looking at areas that may have less rapid tidal movement like the back ends of points, the bottom of some river bends and the areas where there would be less tidal flow. would be great for you guys to post your opinions I plan on taking the kayak out for a night trip tomorrow to a spot I have in mind and ill post results
    1 point
  14. g'day, before I start I did post this report in greater detail in my "quest for the mighty mulloway" thread, where I go through my plan and where I'm targeting, if me posting this report here as well isn't allowed, I apologize. Alrighty, a pretty action packed trip last night! Got out a bit later then I would've liked and paddling over to where I was fishing took a little bit longer then expected. Arrived at around 8.15pm and sounded out the bottom and decided to anchor on a river bend on the edge of a drop off which drops from 2.5 down to 6-7 meters not to far from Alfred's point bridge First rod - a whole pille/ mullet strips with a heaver sinker second rod - whole fresh squid, set up with a small sinker and I would open the bail arm every 5 mins to let it drift with current both rods had 14 pound leader/ 20lb braid to begin with Had a third rod to try and catch some of mullet or tailor which came close to my burly bag, while putting bread on the hook my rod with squid over and take a few meters of moderately tight drag, i grab the rod and as soon as tension was applied the line cut - bullshark Upgraded leader to 20lb and threw out another whole squid also replaced the pilchard with a fresh mullet strip 9.40pm rolls around and I put my second jacket on, as I sit back down my rod with squid buckle's and the drag is flying off, this run easily took 75meters of line and I'm thinking of when is it going to cut me off, then the famous run ends, and dead weight until under the kayak where I loosen the drag and I also finally feel those big thumping headshakes and it makes a few small runs. I tangle with my other line somehow but the fish is on the surface, a few attempts netting it. finally goes in, my god, its big. Colossal tangles in the net and a large jew taking up the entire deck of the kayak, I sat there looking at it in awe, spent a stupid amount of time cutting lines, untangling the net and struggling the even lift the slimy basted off the deck never alone release it without flipping the kayak, I knew it was too late, the fish would release poorly so I made the decision to put it out of its misery and eat my first ever jew. I'm a catch and release guy, but if I do get a feed I like to keep the slightly above legal models and leave the big ones for someone else to catch, my only regret of the night is not trying to release it and not taking so long just looking at the fish, trying to measure it and also untangling the net. The fish was 104cm, stoked to have cracked the meter. took it over to Georges river national park where I fillet the fish, some for me and some for the neighbour and gave the other half of the fish to a group of boys fishing for jews along the shoreline there. Forgot the fish had a tag, hopefully they see it and know what to do with it, as it was still in the fish. Here's the picture and its final measurement 104cm, caught 9:55pm on a whole fresh squid just after the change of the tide which was at 9:05pm, Georges river, near Alfred's point bridge.
    1 point
  15. One night, while watching TV into the wee hours, an ad came on with details of a big fishing competition to be held in the Gosford area. It was called the "Gosford Fun-Fish" and had been organised by the Rotary and Lions Clubs of the area. There were over $30,000 worth of prizes on offer- which was a pretty amazing amount about 35 years ago. The fishing area was basically all of Brisbane Waters and you could fish from a boat or from the shore. The two biggest prizes were boats, a 16ft half cabin complete with trailer, motor and safety gear and a 14ft "car topper" with motor and a few accessories- great prizes- and there were plenty of really worthwhile items from white-goods to fishing tackle as smaller prizes. Sounded great, and it was the first big fishing event outside of club fishing that we'd ever heard of and in easy reach of Sydney anglers. So four of us decided to enter and have a crack at winning a prize. As we were all young rock hoppers, fishing the shore was the plan, however none of us had fished anywhere in Brisbane Waters, so we had to have a look at the old Fishing News Map Book and work out a few different spots to try. For those who aren't familiar with the old map books, they pretty much just gave the very basics of both locations and available species in the area, but they were pretty well the only guides available. We decided that to have a decent chance of a few fish, we'd need live bait and for estuary fishing, that meant either live worms, prawns or nippers- if we wanted to use live poddies or Herring we'd have to catch them on site. Around Sydney, prawns were out of season and you could buy worms fairly easily, but if you wanted nippers you had to pump them yourself and not having a boat, the only areas to pump nippers were miles away from the Ashfield Municipality where we all lived. Grays Point in Port Hacking was marginally closer than Pittwater for nipper collection, but the low tide was in the middle of the day on the Friday before the competition, so that meant someone having a day off to collect bait. After a bit of discussion as to who was going to get the bait, Frank T, Ron C and I decided all three of us would go if Wayne would hit his boss up for some sponsorship for the comp. Wayne worked in a tackle shop and his boss agreed to paying our entry fees and also paid for a T-shirt each for us with the store details printed on. The Friday came around quickly and we set off early for nipper pumping, arriving at Grays Point as the tide was running out. The area has reasonable numbers of nippers, but nowhere near as many as either Mainbar or Gunnamatta Bay closer to the entrance. For Mainbar though, you had to take the much longer drive through the Royal National Park and collecting any bait had been outlawed from Gunnamatta Bay, regardless that there are plenty of nippers there. With three of us pumping, we got plenty of nippers- more than enough for the Fun-fish, which ran from midday on the Saturday until 4pm on the Sunday and with such a great lot of awesome bait, what do young fishermen do?- They take some nippers and go rock fishing of course! We decided that we had plenty of time to go to our regular haunt at Dover Heights on the Friday night, provided we left the rocks before light the next morning, so we could get a couple of hours sleep and swap our rock fishing tackle for the gear we planned to take to Gosford. Hectic schedule, but that's what we planned. We waited until peak hour traffic had finished, picked Wayne up on our way to Dover Heights and climbed down the big cliff after dark, the prospect of using live nippers down there for the first time had us counting all the fish we were going to catch, long before we arrived. It was early October and the westerly winds had been blowing most nights, leaving the sea really flat and perfect for fishing for the big Bream who feed along this section after dark. We were thinking Luderick and Black Drummer would also fill our bags, as they are prone to scoffing live nippers after dark. Typically of fishing, things don't always work out how you plan them and with the sea being virtually dead flat, very little fish activity happened. We did catch a few Bream and Tarwhine, but it was a really disappointing result after collecting such prime bait. We ended up deciding to leave the cliffs and make a run for the only late night hamburger joint we knew would still be open- which was Nelson's back at Bondi Junction, that stayed open until 2am. We made Nelson's in time and had burgers and chips on the way home. At least we'd get a few decent hours of sleep before heading off to Gosford in the morning. We set out for the sign-off and registration area around 10.30am Saturday and were registered and off looking for our first spot just after 1pm, which was the old Gosford Railway Bridge. After having a look there, we decided that it was far too crowded and we set off for the next spot we'd picked from the map book- Saratoga, which looked promising on the map, but on arrival, there were stacks of small sailing boats moving around and it wasn't appealing to fish in amongst them. Then we decided to go to Wagstaffe as we'd heard of good fish coming from there, and after getting lost driving around, finally made it out to the point and threw a line in, but it wasn't much of a spot for shore based fishing and we only caught a couple of undersized fish. Needing to find somewhere more comfortable to pull up for the night (and with less mosquitoes!), we decided we should also be on the other side of the waterway, just to be out of the westerly winds, meaning yet more driving and no fishing. Without a local street directory, we ended up taking ages to get back to Gosford. We spotted the local Macca's and after getting something to eat, decided on heading to Woy Woy where the map book suggested Flathead and Whiting were found around the back of the shops near the saltwater baths. Not a real exciting spot but at least there was some protection from the wind. We fished there for a couple of hours, catching a few small Whiting and Flathead- legal sized, but certainly nothing to win a prize with. As it was nearing low tide in the middle of the night, we decided that another move was in order. After talking with a few friendly locals that walked past, we decided their advice of "try Ettalong Beach- they get plenty of good Flathead along there" was the way to go. So off to Ettalong we went. After arriving at Ettalong, we found some parkland next to the water that looked like a spot we could stay for the night, so we pulled up there and fished for a couple of hours. We landed a few more Whiting and Flathead, and this time the Whiting were good size. By the time we'd all landed a few fish, it was really late and also pretty cold, fatigue had started to set in and the Friday night trip down the cliffs began taking it's toll on us. We'd only gone up in Ron's car, which was a small Datsun 180B -not very roomy for 4 guys to crash in, even for a few hours. We also didn't even consider taking anything to sleep in, nor any food, rather relying on take away shops for our meals. When you're young, you quite often make spur of the moment decisions that probably should have been thought out a bit better, we'd organised the bait gathering well enough, but the rest of the trip was pretty ordinary in terms of planning and organisation. Nevertheless, we were up there giving it a go. The night was cold and pretty uncomfortable, with all of us barely sleeping. All fishermen know the value of fishing the pre-dawn time, as that time of morning sees most species looking for a quick feed in the time before sunrise, but as we were cold and tired, nobody was keen enough to get out of the car. The sun was well up before anyone got a line in the water, before thoughts again turned to food. Not being familiar with the area at all, we decided to send two of the guys off in search of somewhere to buy something to eat, while the remaining two fished on. A couple of hours after leaving, the two on the food search were back, saying the only shops they'd found were closed and we'd have to head back to Gosford to find food. With garages and convenience stores like they are these days, it was hard to believe it was so difficult to find somewhere selling hot food, but when you aren't a local, that's it. We also considered scrapping the idea of going to the weigh-in, but agreed that we had a few fish and there were heaps of prizes, including plenty of "secret weight" prizes, so we may as well stay. One thing with fish to be weighed-in was that you had to find a 'marshal' before attending the weighing area. They were situated in about 6 or 7 different locations around the area and were supposed to 'sight' fish, to try and keep everything above board and prevent any cheating. Any fish caught during the night were expected to be kept 'fresh' and whole, but the marshal idea seemed to have plenty of flaws if anyone intended on cheating. Before we packed up, another two fishermen walked past us and stopped for a chat. They weren't fishing the comp, but suggested we were about to leave at a time when there were usually a few fish around in our spot. They also gave us some Pilchards they had left over, so we changed over rigs to ganged hooks and set our rods up along the bank. Within half an hour we managed a few more Flathead before it went quiet again and hunger got the better of us. The fishermen who'd given us the Pilchards had also given us directions to the only shop selling hot food in the area and we decided to head there, but Wayne T said he'd stay and keep an eye on the gear and continue fishing while the other three of us went to the shop. Two should have stayed, but we were all famished and left Wayne lying on the grass bank next to where the rods were set up. Arriving at the shop, there was quite a few people waiting for their orders to be cooked, so we were gone for about 45 minutes. When we got back to the fishing spot, Wayne was nowhere to be seen. All our gear was still there, but with the amount of people around, we were probably lucky nobody took anything. There was also another older fisherman sitting on a chair about 30 meters away and he called us over and asked if we were looking for the fisherman who'd been there. He said he'd netted a big Flathead for him and a couple of people had come and called him away. Turned out that the other two were roving marshals and they needed to dye all the fish that we'd caught in order for them to be weighed in. After colouring all the fish with beetroot dye, they were back in our esky, but Wayne had wandered off somewhere further up the road. There was a really big crowd in the front yard of a house up the road, so I walked up to see what was going on and ask if anybody had seen our mate. Just as I approached the crowded yard a voice sang out from above me and it was Wayne. Someone from the party had seen the landing of his Flathead and they'd come and asked him if they could take some photo's of it back at the house. As the party was for a guys 70th birthday, it was a pretty big spread and they'd invited Wayne to stay for a beer and a feed, which he of course did because he hadn't eaten . I still hadn't seen the Flathead, but told Wayne we had to get moving in order to get to the weigh-in and he'd have to come straight away. He never wore a watch and had no idea that time was running out to make it back to the park at Gosford, but downed his beer and disappeared into the house before emerging with a giant Flathead. It was half coated in bright beetroot dye and a real beauty. We ran back to the car where Frank and Ron had packed up all the gear and were impatiently waiting. On seeing the Flathead, we decided it would do well for the comp and raced back to Gosford, just getting to the weigh-in area with about 5 minutes to spare. The award ceremony for prize winners went on for a fair while and we picked up a prize for a secret weight Flathead of about a kilo, before the winning fish was announced as Wayne's. The big fish weighed just under 6.75kg- just under 15lb on the old scale and was almost double the size of the next largest fish weighed in- another Flatty of 3.4kg. The prize for biggest fish was a 14ft aluminium boat with a 9.9hp long-shaft motor, a fuel tank and life jackets plus about 6 Jarvis Walker rods complete with Ryobi reels. There was also the big prize of the half cabin and it was won by someone who hadn't even caught a fish, but put their ticket in the barrel. Photographers from the local newspaper and a couple of magazines took shots of us holding up our fish, which was going to make our sponsor happy as our white T-shirts had the store name on the front in big letters. Australasian Post magazine did a feature story on the event and there was plenty of positive media coverage as well. By the time all the formalities were over, we then had the problem of how we were going to get everything home. The "car topper" was far too large for the roof racks on the 180B, not to mention the motor and fuel tank. The fishing gear and trophy we managed to get in, but the big items had us wondering what to do. Thankfully, the organisers came to the rescue and offered to transport the boat, motor and accessories to us by truck within the following week, which was really nice of them. We left the weigh-in and as we already knew where Macca's was, decided we'd better eat before driving back to Sydney. On arriving at the drive-through window with fishing rods all over the roof, before ordering, the girls behind the window gave us heaps for buying fillet of fish burgers, to which we replied we'd caught quite a few fish. They didn't believe us, so after ordering and moving to the 'waiting area' for our food, we got out of the car and grabbed a few fish to show off. When the big Flatty was produced, the window girls informed the manager that we'd won the Fun-Fish and as he was a keen fisher, he came to have a look. Turned out to be a great move as he gave us the entire order for free! Although really tired, we had a lot of laughs on the way back to Sydney and a good tale to tell about the big Flathead, which ended up in my fridge as Wayne's was too small. The boys came over during the week and we filleted the big fish plus a few smaller Flatties and cut them all into cocktail sized pieces, which my Mum deep-fried in egg and breadcrumbs. We had heard from plenty of mates that Flathead of that size weren't much good on the plate, but we all agreed it was absolutely beautiful to eat, accompanied by both pour-over plum sauce and sweet and sour. The boat arrived at Frank T's place during the week, but when they delivered the motor, the box was badly broken at the bottom and a quick inspection revealed major damage to the motor leg. It had obviously been dropped from a height as the bottom of the leg looked like it been belted with a hard object. A phone call to the organisers had them ringing insurance companies and within about a fortnight another motor was organised for us as a replacement. It took another two months for the new motor to come to Sydney and we had to collect it from a boat dealer at Mona Vale- who was very unfriendly for reasons unknown to us. Without a trailer, with the boat being so large, nobody could really use it as it was, besides, 4 was too many for a boat that size. We ended up taking a few months to sell it and it became a hire-boat on the Hawkesbury at Brooklyn. We only got $1200 for it, so $300 each for the four of us. It was a very memorable trip and we were very lucky to end up with a good prize, considering we knew nothing about fishing in the area. Sleeping in the car and living on Macca's food was part of the experience. Just goes to show that anyone can do well in a fishing comp, as you just have to be in the right place at the right time to catch a big one.
    1 point
  16. Despite being limited to local rock fishing of late I haven't managed to catch many drummer this winter, a few outings with one or two and plenty with zero. A lot more fisho's on the rocks mid week this year I guess due to covid they can't travel and work hours are obviously flexible, so my local rocks have had more fishing pressure I reckon . Anyway I decided to have another go on Thursday arvo and it felt a bit weird going drummer fishing when the temp hit 30 degrees here - I'm used to cold winds and even colder water when chasing the pigs off the rocks. When I arrived I was disappointed to see two guys already on the wash I wanted to fish. The swell and tide were both low enough to try a wash that is usually unfishable so I thought may as well give it ago and see if the other blokes leave after a while (they didn't but that didn't matter as it turned out). It took a few casts to work out which way the wash moved the bait and where the shallow rocks were but after a while a got a few bites and sprang off a fish that could have been a drummer. I re-baited with a prawn and cast into the white water and quickly came up tight on what was obviously a drummer as he went straight down for the nearest overhang. He jammed himself in and I wasn't optimistic of getting him out but I lay the rod over in the opposite direction and kept steady pressure on as a few waves came through and must have dislodged him and he took off in another direction looking for the next hole. I knew this was my best chance and lent heavily on the rod and lifted and wound as hard as possible and just got him to the edge of the rock shelf in front of me. That's when I had my first glimpse of the fish and got really stressed as it was way bigger than I'd expected. I paused till the next wave came through that lifted him over the lip of the shelf and onto a long ledge below me with enough water to bring him back another 8 or 10 meters to where I could jump down and lift him up. If you've ever tried to pick up a wet cranky drummer you'll know how slippery they are. So it was a few tense moments till I could step back up to dry rocks while hugging the drummer in an effort not to drop him. It was a good length (measured later at just under 53cm) but ridiculously fat! I don't take scales with me but reckon it would have been 3-4 kg. I put my knife next to it to give some scale. I fished on for another hour catching one more smaller drummer that went around 38cm but the sweep had moved in and then the southerly buster came through so I called it quits but was very pleased to finally have a decent fish to bring home. Cheers Fil
    1 point
  17. The Dine and Discover has been extended until June 2022.
    1 point
  18. Agree with Noel .. if you suspect the carbs then you need to get a proper carb clean done... or do it yourself. Did you test the fuel pump after changing it? - disconnect the tube feeding the carbs and point it into a container and crank the engine... are you getting good flow? BTW, for comparison my old 1999 EFI Merc 200hp idled at 700-750rpm ... whether on muffs or lower leg submerged in water. The back pressure should not be affecting yours to the extent you are seeing. Cheers Zoran PS - I have sent you PM with details of a mobile mech that was recommended to me, but I have not had a need to use him as yet.
    1 point
  19. Yeah I really want to get out every weekend for a fish, try new spots and eventually move onto new species.My goal is to eventually catch a rat king by the end of summer, but let’s just see how I go with the flattys first
    1 point
  20. Yes they can carry on sometimes, usually a bit of a run or just be heavy as f.... I'm not exactly sure of my technique, I just wind it in carefully,
    1 point
  21. Around gladesville and generaly just fish around Clarke’s point,Milsons point and Bradley’s head
    1 point
  22. No problems macca. I kid you not, it was the raiders who got me onto my first fish on an SP (a flatty) in something like 2005! Feels like an eternity now... Let's just say that in a year or two, catching fish on SPs will no longer feel remarkable But you don't get sick of it; you just set new goals and explore a little more.
    1 point
  23. Yeah a rag seems smart, are they any good for eating?
    1 point
  24. Decarb is probably not going to fix anything, it's idling way too fast, it needs a proper carb clean and everything set as it should be.
    1 point
  25. @motiondave I like it. I will eventually mod the golf trolley I bought for 5 dollars a while ago in a similar manner.
    1 point
  26. Sounds and looks like an awesome dat out! Top stuff. Thanks for sharing- I can almost taste the salt spray. cheers Zoran
    1 point
  27. a shop bait freezer catch clean cook?
    1 point
  28. cracker photos!!!
    1 point
  29. Great experience, those whales look amazing and the snapper must've topped it of.
    1 point
  30. Super photos. Well done.
    1 point
  31. Great photos Joh.
    1 point
  32. Wow nice photos. and the snapper is a bonus
    1 point
  33. I notice from your questions that you seem to be new to fishing Long Reef. I don't mean to put a cloud on your intentions but just want to make sure you have done all the research and have given your self time to gain the necessary experience to have a safe outing.... perhaps even find some experienced companion's to journey out with. I think you'll find most Raiders will advise take it slow and build your experience. I don't fish off a Yak but I do fish Long Reef from my 6.3m boat. Long Reef is an extended reef system that stretches more than 10km+ east (Long Reef wide). .. depth varies from 10m to 25m closer in, and to 60M+ wider out. It's a typical reef system in that regard with many nooks and ledges and drop offs. When it fires up it's red hot. It also is attracts all the predators and great white sightings and encounters are not uncommon. There was an incident that was recorded on video back in 2008 where a 5m GW tipped a kayaker into the water. Fortunately he was with a group of yaks and a tinny fisherman that rallied to assist... the footage is 2008 quality but you'll get the idea. If you search YouTube for Long Reef and Kayak ... you'll get a sense of what fishing is like there and what folks have encountered. Being a reef system Long Reef is prone to rogue waves ... there have been several incidents of boats as large as 6m flipped there by rogue waves. Remember: everyone starts boating with a bag full of luck and an empty bag of experience, the objective is to fill your bag with experience before you run out of luck. Cheers Zoran
    1 point
  34. Knew there would be at least one raider 😉
    1 point
  35. I must echo Little-Flatty. The outstanding leadership and advice given on this platform has a light in the COVID darkness. Well done.
    1 point
  36. Speaking of which, do any raiders have a membership to the fishing world membership magazine as I was in this months edition. 😄.
    1 point
  37. It must be fated. We also have heavy week of appointments and services!
    1 point
  38. Well done Yowie! Lock down for me finishes 11:59pm tonight, but stupid me i booked my boat service in for tomorrow 3 months ago! Weather doesn't look the best though so i feel a bit better.... Hopefully i can get my little tinny outside when the swell backs off....
    1 point
  39. I find the current direction dictates where you fish, rather than the fish not being there (if you get what I mean) for me, most big fish tend to be "loners" (or a pair) as distinct from warmer water schooling fish, there's a few spots I fish (and have done for decades) that never produce big Snapper (bigger than 5kg) but you will catch plenty of legal ones, other places have few smaller, but now and then, a big one or two, mainly during the colder months, my biggest (12.2kg) was from just such a spot. All this of course is just touching on anchored bait fishing, drifting and lures is another topic altogether.
    1 point
  40. Thanks for that mate, really appreciate it.. I'm a long way from 40 years experience but I've definitely noticed there's a correlation between current direction and speed for different spots! That's the part about fishing that's good but, everytime you go out you learn something new cheers mate 🍻
    1 point
  41. Early april 1 at dawn 1 at midday on livie 23 dg water
    1 point
  42. That does look thick. nice catch
    1 point
  43. Thanks @mrsswordfisherman It was a fun article to write. Fishing with kids is something I do often with my family. Making them enjoy it and feel safe on the water is always my priority. cheers scratchie!!!
    1 point
  44. A very long time since I've had fresh Flathead. Only Murray Cod and Yellas to be had fresh in my region, everything else is at least a couple of days old. HOWEVER, this is about to change, as I am determined to get into some FRESH fish during my next visits to the coast. Top report Jeff, well done. bn
    1 point
  45. Have mostly been lying low fishing-wise during lockdown, but when doing one of my grocery shops recently, I decided to buy a few slimeys and salt them down ready for when we can get out more. This week my eldest asked me to take her fishing. She even promised to wake up early and get ready quietly so that it would only be the two of us. So this morning we got our chance. Woke up early, found everyone else asleep, so we took a slimey fillet out of the fridge and headed down to our local spot. Not sure if it was the rain or tides, but there wasn't the usual level of activity bite-wise. But reeling in to check on my bait, I came up tight on this model: No giant, but I think it felt bigger than it was because of the element of surprise. Was good to get a fish after so long, I think you could see my smile behind the mask! Happy snap and then back in the drink it went. Apart from that, my daughter got to experience a proper bite. Happened on the drop, so it took us both by surprise. She's relatively new to this fishing business so it is probably a good thing that we didn't connect - it was probably another legal bream and would have given her a run for her money on her little alvey rod. After that I was hankering for a coffee and had to get ready for work, so it was time to go home. Here's to things getting better so we can get out again!
    1 point
  46. I have a good mechanic in Ingleburn. I guess it depends on how close you are
    1 point
  47. hi ash before you get ripped off any more what is the issue .can you describe issue to us . we are all here to help people like you no to get ripped off cheers dunc 333
    1 point
  48. I asked “Charlie” my granddaughter what she would like to do for her birthday on Monday. “Go fishing with you grandad, with my pink rod” she said (My kinda gal). Don’t know if she’ll want to do this in 8 years when she’s 16, so strike while the iron’s hot. Because of the howling wind, we went float fishing in our top dam near the house for silver perch using corn and bread. We caught 11 fish in less than 1/2 an hour, before she lost interest and went off to chase lambs around the paddock and dip-netting for tadpoles with Grandma (Mrs Pickles) A great day to spend an 8th birthday.
    1 point
  49. Fantastic pics I bet it was great to go fishing and a big well done to Amy
    1 point
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