zmk1962

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About zmk1962

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    Castle Hill

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  1. zmk1962

    How much anchor rope

    @blaxland when you say "I see lots of spots are deep" what depth are you considering fishing in? As others have said, to hold your position, you need 3-4 times depth in good weather, and more in bad weather. Its all to do with the angle of pull on the anchor. The shallower the angle the more the anchor bites in, the steeper the angle the more you are lifting the anchor out of the sea bed. Add on to that the effect of wave chop jerking on the anchor and you can see how having more rope out tends to act as a buffer. You can have a steeper angle (less rope) if you have more chain, a lighter boat, calmer weather or if you do not want to hold position and are prepared to drift a little. Here's some of my experiences re anchoring fishing up to 60m. Up until 2017 I did exactly as @rickmarlin62 posted. Carried 148m anchor rode. 8m chain followed by 140m of 12mm silver rope (12mm is easier on fingers than a thinner rope) and used the buoy method (see attached picture). My rope was made up of two lengths spliced together so that the join fed easily through the bow roller. I fished up to 30-40m depth relatively comfortably, but even though the buoy helped lift the anchor, I still found it a chore to bring in 80-90m of wet rope and chain (especially in cold weather and with getting a touch of arthritis). Also, I carry two sea drougues (sea anchors) and found that even with two out they really did not slow me down that much. My boat is a deep V with high sides and canopy, so it catches the wind like a sail, and the deep V eventually turns us to run with the wind (path of least resistance in the water). In the end, I installed an anchor winch with 138m of anchor rode. 8m chain, 130m rope. I comfortably fish up to 60m depths and have actually modified how I fish for species like flathead .... you can see my report in this post - I call it the "drift and drop" .... Note: because I am really only trying to slow my drift, I find that even 80m of rode with a danforth anchor does the job in 50-60m of water to do this . If I wanted to hold, I'd really need to let out all of the rode or move into shallower water. Cheers Zoran
  2. zmk1962

    Dual outboard flusher

    @JonD thats strange, I have used the same double earmuffs for at least 10yrs... no issues. Maybe where you buy them has a bad batch, but as @Fab1 says a garden hose y-splitter should fix that problem permanently. I always felt that if hose water pressure is affecting the power of the tell tale then your water pump is starting to fail. The hose pressure should not be forcing water past the water pump impellers. Out on the water, your motor leg is submerged and its totally relying on the water pump to push the water up the leg (there is no hose pressure to help it). So when flushing if the hose pressure is pushing up past the water pump that indicates to me that the impeller blades have worn out, or are getting soft and about to fail. The purpose of the earmuffs and hose are just to provide sufficient water immersion for the water pump impeller to do its job. Lots of people prefer to flush using a bucket/barrel which submerges the lower leg to help that water pump immersion . I took a variation of this idea, and made a muffler/silencer flusher gizmo out of pvc pipe that also fed a water column to the prop exhaust. This coupled with the double earmuffs simulated the leg being immersed in water and also provided back pressure to the exhaust for a smoother quieter idle. I posted on this several years ago in this fishraider post. Cheers Zoran
  3. zmk1962

    Broughton reds not

    Well at least you got a feed and went out - I’ve been too busy with work - stuck ashore for months now !! Reckon if you catch an 8kg model on next trip your average will hold. Best of luck! Zoran
  4. zmk1962

    Nulon marine 2 stroke

    I think I posted previously, I found Penrite very smokey on start... I use Mercury Quicksilver Premium 2-Str (pricer) but much better... a shop stocks it. Cheers Zoran
  5. zmk1962

    Jervis Bay - Jackets & Navies

    Nice report.... thanks for sharing... certainly a better day than being in the office. Those jackets can be pesky especially if they are small.... don't mind a feed of the bigger models but the small ones are just a nuisance. Cheers Zoran
  6. Sitting on the anchor is definitely more relaxing and less work especially with a junior crew member as you have. But in terms of productive fishing, I feel it really depends on the the target species, the tide flow and the submerged terrain of the estuary that you are working. Examples 1. targeting flathead on sandy bottom - drift with the tide. The flathead will be waiting in the gutters for food to drift over them with the tidal flow. As @kiwicraig says you cover more ground and increase your odds. If the current is slow I'll drop some burley in the pot - fish follow the trail. If current is fast - I don't bother with the burley. 2. incoming tide where you know there is a deep hole or drop off (eg Flint and Steel on Hawkesbury, 8m to 22m drop), anchor on the hi side (up current) and burley. Drift baits in the burley trail over the drop off for all sorts of fish (bream, snapper etc) and predators (jews, hairtail, sharks etc). In other words work with what you are presented and mix it up. Since installing the electric anchor winch I have actually started to use a combination of the above - drift and drop. eg. I'll drift until we hit some good size flatties, then drop the anchor and swing on the anchor rope for a while and generally pick up a few more - then its quite easy to let out another 10-20-30m and repeat. If the bite slows we up anchor and drift again. We have observed that flatties tend to hang around in schools of roughly the same size (guess that stops them eating each other) and by anchoring rather than just drifting straight past we pick up a few more then we used to previously. This has worked for me more in offshore deeper water (30-60m) but I guess it could be used in the estuary setting.... again depending on the conditions and terrain. Cheers Zoran
  7. zmk1962

    coal and candle creek

    I guess it's as @rickmarlin62 once said.... that's why its called "fishing".... if we knew all the answers then it would be called "catching". At least you were out there rather than infront of the TV. Good on ya! On a more constructive note, remind me was it an overcast night or bright moonlit night? Did you burley? Hairtail will be where there are baitfish. Cheers Zoran
  8. zmk1962

    Fishing Saturday

    Jealous! ... great result. Hard to beat a day out especially when you score a feed. Cheers Zoran
  9. zmk1962

    refurbish fibroglass boat

    Hi Antony, Not sure if any others are still interested in this topic...but in answer to your questions. How do you get in the boat? In my case a fold down ladder off the back pod. Re Hydraulic steering, I purchased a kit from the W***s chandlery place. Kit came with the helm pump, bullhorn ram, pressure tube, fittings, fluid etc. It was relatively pricey but was a complete solution. It was quite easy to install for the handy DIY person. The helm pump needs a cutout to protrude into the cabin where you attach the pressure tubing with york-tight type fittings. It is bolted into place on the dash. The bullhorn bolts through the outboard pivot tube (no modifications required to outboard) and the ram is attached to the short stubby outboard tiller arm (again in my case all the bolts were provided). The hydraulics are a cinch for a mechanic or anyone with experience bleeding hydraulic brakes. Working with a buddy definitely made the job easier especially when it came to bleeding the lines - one on the helm pump keeping it topped up and the other at the back bleeding the air out. If you want any more specifics on hydraulics Antony just PM or call me. Also, if you want to extend the topic, in my case, to make my boat "more friendly" I also converted from a marine canvas bimini to a taller hardtop with plate glass screens and a washer wiper system. Surprisingly this has made a bigger difference in terms of ride comfort then I had ever imagined would be the case. My mates and I come back dry from the sloppiest swell and less dehydrated or burnt when out in the sun. Also big thumbs up from the Mrs when she ventures out. (Before)Marine Canvas Bimini: (After) Hard Top Version: And on the water...front view... (ignore my bro-in-law's mug shot) Cheers Zoran
  10. zmk1962

    HAIRTAIL ARE ON

    Great job... good on you for braving the cold and landing a hairy to boot ! Cheers Zoran
  11. zmk1962

    Hairtail Setup

    Hmmm I knew I posted about this at some point in the past... sure enough found it... 2013 !!! .. where did the time go? Glean what you can from this post but in essence: whippy rod with strong butt section, I prefer a spin reel as when they are coming up at you - you need to retrieve that slack line quickly to maintain tension ... Cheers Zoran
  12. zmk1962

    Pittwater Fishinh Question?

    So I guess you are launching at Pittwater... and that's where you will be entering the Hawkesbury's very large river system... at Pittwater you are close to the heads. So it's a very open ended question that you ask. Also you mention "on a buoy"... if you plan to tie off on a buoy just be aware that most are taken early afternoon by yachts doing their overnight stay. Personally I have not had much luck fishing tied off buoys - too much commotion in the area. If you are considering anchoring then... do you plan to overnight in Pittwater, or are you considering heading up stream to some of the well know bays like Jerusalem Bay or Cowan Ck (search for hairtail), or floating livies over the drop of at Flint'n'Steel or Juno point...or just sitting near the mouth of the river ???? Please share a bit more about your boat size/capabilities and I'm sure fishraiders will be able to offer more constructive assistance. Also make sure all your boat navigation lights work and you have all safety gear for the overnight stay. Cheers Zoran
  13. zmk1962

    HAIRTAIL ARE ON

    From my experience on the Hawkesbury - most evenings, nights and mornings have fog. Fog is just steam, so it's a natural occurrence whenever the water temperature is higher than the surrounding air like in winter. Also, the fog is more prevalent when there is no wind especially in the narrow bays and inlets with steeper surrounding terrain - eg, Cowan Ck system, Jerusalem Bay etc. You just have to be prepared for that. Slow and steady, night lights on, torch and horn at ready. Cheers Zoran PS: I sometimes check other sources - like webcams to check on the local conditions - there is a webcam looking over the M1 Hawkesbury Rd bridge near Mooney Mooney ... if you see fog up that high its a white out below .... https://straya.io/webcams/m1-pacific-motorway-hawkesbury-river/
  14. zmk1962

    Electrical problem

    Glad you're up and running Luke. You did the work mate! Cheers. Thanks so much Donna. It's always good to give back a bit. Cheers.
  15. zmk1962

    Electrical problem

    Hi mate. It sounds like the radio, sounder and lights are on the same circuit and maybe pulling the yellow on the sounder shorted out the fuse on that circuit which took out the other gear as well. the fuse would be located after the switch and before any of the electrical gear (lights, radio, sounder). But its only a guess as we'd need more info about your boat's wiring set up. Probably easier to talk through. PM sent. Cheers Zoran