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Davison

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About Davison

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  1. Mine just died without explanation as well. 9 months old. Working fine the other week, went out yesterday and she's dead.
  2. I have a 2020 Yamaha 25hp on my estuary boat (Quintrex 390 Explorer Outback). The little Yam is a beast on that hull. Boat runs a full floor/casting deck, battery, electronics, fishing gear, esky, 2 people and dog. So probably not far off a 420 Rampage running light with 1 person. Heaps of grunt out of the hole and does mid 40s flat out. Perfect for the ~4m open hulls. If it were me w/ a 420 I'd still prefer max horsepower but I think the 25 yam would hold its own. Probably find the limits with 3 people and gear though. Streaker Marine fit the 25hp to 420 Bustas, maybe give them a call a
  3. While not in the Shire, I'd take it to the Boat Pimpers in Condell Park if you want a top quality job.
  4. The notion of "move on, take it as a bad/learning experience" is more for the buyer and not the seller in most cases, in my view. If you took the boat off the market and waited for them, then they reneged, you've been burdened with the opportunity cost of not being able to sell the boat in the meantime while they were mucking around. If it was agreed that the deposit was refundable pending an inspection/survey, that's different. If it was simply a case of "take it off the market"; "I've changed my mind, I don't want it any more", there would be many people who wouldn't be returning t
  5. Heavier build is more about ride than strength. Probably not worth too much thought in the ~4m class, particularly if you're only working estuaries. Quintrex recently dropped the 2mm option on their 1.6mm Outback Explorers, only really adds weight and in the sub 4m models there's usually more benefit in being lighter- low hp 4 strokes, car toppers etc. Quintrex/Stacer/Savage come from the same factory as mentioned, although the bottom sheet pressings are usually different on the Quintrex models. If you want something that'll do well in bigger chop, starting point would be the 420 Renegade
  6. To date the best modern 150hp produced. Big displacement, torque curve like a 200hp, only 206kg.
  7. I'd be wary of shock absorber type pedestal designs, when they bottom out the force is actually amplified and can do serious harm. I run sharks personally, bit pricey but they're safe.
  8. They essentially took the Bar Crusher solution (which knowing BC was probably itself 'borrowed' from somewhere else) and improved it a little (spring loaded instead of a bungee). Mine works great. Helps that they design and build their own trailers, they fit to the hulls like a glove so it's pretty easy to nail the retrieve.
  9. Quintrex do not bring in hulls from China. Telwater was doing that for a little while with the Savage 'glass range, but their bread and butter alloy hull range (Quintrex, Stacer) are still all Australian. Whether BRP who now own Telwater will push for an imported product down the track is anybody's guess. In relation to stitch welding, the top decks are stitch welded and you pay more to have it fully welded, which is a good idea if you want the paint to have the best chance over the long term. Agree it would be nice if they were fully welded as standard for the price you pay, although granted
  10. I run a second battery and a jump starter. There's comfort in knowing you can leave electronics running at anchor without wondering how low the battery is getting. The mini jump starter lives in the cab as a last resort.
  11. Both good brands. The Bar Crusher has more a cult-like following, will probably hold its value better. One key difference is the Bar Crushers are quite narrow for their length. The Yellowfin will be a wider boat and probably longer too (BC tend to overstate length). But with the narrower beam, the BC will likely ride better, although won't be as stable at rest as the Yellowfin. Both good rigs from respected brands. For me I would go the Bar Crusher, they're built well and typically get a good wrap by their owners. Although I'd also be looking at Surtees, i.e. the original NZ Company
  12. In my experience we rarely get assists concerning newer engines of any make and when we do, it's generally unrelated to the engine itself (fuel/battery/kill switch, etc). All of the late model engines are very well sorted nowadays. Very rarely if ever do I see assists of ETEC powered vessels, which is not bad considering they're probably the most common late model engines on Sydney waterways, usually on Quinnies and Stacers which are rigged with them from factory. MRNSW use Suzuki outboards, but that's due to a supply deal with Suzuki, not necessarily because they're reliable. Water Polic
  13. Government funding does not cover the costs to run a Marine Rescue unit, not even close unfortunately. MRNSW rely on all 44 units to fundraise all year round, in addition to donations from vessel assists and local sponsors. Kudos to OP for donating, every dollar is needed. The costs to keep a unit running are astronomical. At Solander for instance, in the last 6 months they have incurred over $200k of expenses relating to repowering one of the vessels and replacing the dock at Hungry Point, which was more than 30 years old. Then consider the yearly fuel and maintenance costs for two 600hp
  14. Might be pot luck with that guy, we had some clears done by him and they were shocking beyond belief. Took them back and he didn't want to know about it, told us he's too busy to sort them out and to come back in "maybe a couple of months". Dirt bag. Ended up having them redone elsewhere, paid twice but lesson learned, some people just don't stand by their work.
  15. It happens all the time at Foreshore/low tide, handbrake can only lock the 2 rear wheels and particularly on rear drive cars, front wheels are free to turn because they're not connected to anything. So the only thing holding many cars in place is the rear wheels. When they get on the slippery stuff, the car will slide straight in unless you can engage the front brakes (which will still have grip further up the ramp), as old mate has done in this situation.
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