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So basically moved to Sydney few years back. Always wanted to get in to fishing and finally I’ve started. Was fishing down at Greenwich point wharf and surrounding areas. Was using lures then tried some jelly bait fish. Plenty of bites but no luck. Looking for some tips on what I should be using etc. thanks

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8 hours ago, Bryanb609 said:

So basically moved to Sydney few years back. Always wanted to get in to fishing and finally I’ve started. Was fishing down at Greenwich point wharf and surrounding areas. Was using lures then tried some jelly bait fish. Plenty of bites but no luck. Looking for some tips on what I should be using etc. thanks

Hi Bryan and welcome to Fishraider. Probably the best place to start is with baits that will catch the common species found where you fish. Use either a light sinker, or no sinker and a 2/0 octopus hook and fish from wharves, shore. using mullet, prawns or squid. Always good to get some berley and use it too. This will attract the fish to where you're fishing. Good luck, see how you go, bn

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Hi Bryan,

Fishing has a lot of nuance to it. I'll share a few rules of thumb that hopefully will get you started. 

1. I was taught that if you're getting bites but not hooking up, use a smaller hook with a smaller bait. Just keep stepping it down one size at a time until you start catching fish.

2. Big Neil's suggestion is excellent. There are two general styles of hook. The ones where you do the work and ones where the fish do the work. Octopus/circle hooks are the kind where the fish do the work. They're designed so that as the fish eats the bait and swims away, the hook "sets itself" in the fish's lip. The downside for more advanced anglers is the hookup ratio can be a little lower, but the big upside is you don't have to watch like a hawk and set the hook perfectly. It's much more foolproof. The other big advantage is fish are less likely to completely swallow a circle hook or octopus hook, so if you catch a fish you don't want to keep, you can usually release it with a minimum amount of harm done. 

3. This should probably be number 1. Watch the poeple who are catching fish. Pull up a chair and just observe. Even better if there are quite a few of them on a wharf or pier. After watching, strike up some conversations and ask some questions. Be friendly and don't get in the way and most fishos are happy to chat. Don't be ashamed to copy exactly what they're doing. Chances are good that everyone catching fish in the same spot are all doing pretty much the same thing anyway. 

4. Be there when the fish are. For *most* fishing, an hour before high tide to an hour after high tide is usually the most productive. When that time period overlaps sunrise or sunset, moonrise or moonset, that can be even better. It's not a hard rule, fish can be caught anytime, anywhere, but fish move in cycles just like we do. If you're a police officer and you want to catch someone speeding, you don't sit on a side street in the middle of a Sunday arvo. You sit on the freeway during peak hours when everyone is trying to get to work or home as fast as possible. High tide is peak hour for fish. 

Edited by MainframeJames
Giving credit to bn
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Some good tips in there @MainframeJames. I'd add that having a light rod will also help, 1-3kg, and a light long leader the length of your rod in the 4lb's range. That will help you with Bream, but you might get a few bust offs with flattys. 

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Flatheadluke I’m literally interested in catching anything. Open to all types and ways of catching them. Thanks for all the responses. Gonna head down after work for couple of hours  and give it another go. I’ll keep you’s posted ??

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No record breaker but caught something!! Used a rig with a size 2 sinker and some small pieces of squid

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Looks like the size of fish i usually catch lol, plenty that big, not so easy getting the bigger ones from my experience so far.

keep on trying, follow the advice above and your luck will turn.

 

P.S. i wouldn't eat the fish west of the harbor bridge if i was you due to dioxins the following link has more info if your not already aware https://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/fishing/recreational/fishing-skills/fishing-in-sydney-harbour

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Cheers dude. Not to interested in eating anything from the harbour. I’m just in it for the fishing and releasing ??

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12 hours ago, Bryanb609 said:

No record breaker but caught something!! Used a rig with a size 2 sinker and some small pieces of squid

Well done mate!

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20 hours ago, Bryanb609 said:

No record breaker but caught something!! Used a rig with a size 2 sinker and some small pieces of squid

Well done Bryan. We've probably all started exactly like you have. Keep learning and remember that persistence pays off. bn

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On 27/03/2018 at 5:18 PM, nutsaboutfishing said:

if you're at Greenwich, try fishing at Blackwattle Bay

What’s for catching there mate?? Do you fish there much

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4 hours ago, Bryanb609 said:

What’s for catching there mate?? Do you fish there much

Been there a couple of times using soft plastics. I've caught snapper, bream and flounder. There's good access to deep water within an easy cast

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Just had an insane afternoon of fishing.. caught some big boys all shapes and sizes. Not sure what they are? Anybody know

472085F7-CE0C-428C-84FB-2CC237217E80.jpeg

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leather jacket!

good eating

green one looks like a wrasse of some sort.

 

Edited by antonywardle

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Nice ! where did you catch them if you don't mind, Ive been struggling to find edible sized leatherjackets, only getting small ones in the spots Ive tried so far. looking forward to a nice feed of LJ"s mmmm ...

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8 hours ago, TurtleTown said:

Nice ! where did you catch them if you don't mind, Ive been struggling to find edible sized leatherjackets, only getting small ones in the spots Ive tried so far. looking forward to a nice feed of LJ"s mmmm ...

Just beside Greenwich point wharf. I’ve been following the shore line and trying a few spots. Are they good eating?? 

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Leather jackets are considered good eating for sure, my trouble has been getting them big enough to get a good size fillet off. 

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Just be careful how much fish you eat that side of the harbor bridge as mentioned before.

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On 26/03/2018 at 6:53 AM, MainframeJames said:

Hi Bryan,

Fishing has a lot of nuance to it. I'll share a few rules of thumb that hopefully will get you started. 

1. I was taught that if you're getting bites but not hooking up, use a smaller hook with a smaller bait. Just keep stepping it down one size at a time until you start catching fish.

2. Big Neil's suggestion is excellent. There are two general styles of hook. The ones where you do the work and ones where the fish do the work. Octopus/circle hooks are the kind where the fish do the work. They're designed so that as the fish eats the bait and swims away, the hook "sets itself" in the fish's lip. The downside for more advanced anglers is the hookup ratio can be a little lower, but the big upside is you don't have to watch like a hawk and set the hook perfectly. It's much more foolproof. The other big advantage is fish are less likely to completely swallow a circle hook or octopus hook, so if you catch a fish you don't want to keep, you can usually release it with a minimum amount of harm done. 

3. This should probably be number 1. Watch the poeple who are catching fish. Pull up a chair and just observe. Even better if there are quite a few of them on a wharf or pier. After watching, strike up some conversations and ask some questions. Be friendly and don't get in the way and most fishos are happy to chat. Don't be ashamed to copy exactly what they're doing. Chances are good that everyone catching fish in the same spot are all doing pretty much the same thing anyway. 

4. Be there when the fish are. For *most* fishing, an hour before high tide to an hour after high tide is usually the most productive. When that time period overlaps sunrise or sunset, moonrise or moonset, that can be even better. It's not a hard rule, fish can be caught anytime, anywhere, but fish move in cycles just like we do. If you're a police officer and you want to catch someone speeding, you don't sit on a side street in the middle of a Sunday arvo. You sit on the freeway during peak hours when everyone is trying to get to work or home as fast as possible. High tide is peak hour for fish. 

I was under the impression octopus and circle hooks were different. I thought an octopus hook needed to be set?

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