garfield28

Trailer repairs

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Geoff. That's a hard call mate. Personally if it was my trailer I would persevere and re-build it, but that's me as I believe new trailers are way over priced and I can't see how they justify asking what they do for what it is.

But sometimes you have to bight the bullet, if you have to have a welder do the work then the cost might outweigh the benefits and after all the expense you still end up with a trailer that would be prone to rust out in some other spot not repaired. If you buy another 2nd hand trailer you are running the risk of the same thing happening soon down the track.

Buying new, you can look after the trailer from the start and then IF it rusts out again you only have yourself to blame.

Alloy trailers don't rust and if you could afford such an animal I would recommend that's the way to go.

The last 4 trailers I have built from scratch have all been alloy, and I have one more to build, but it might take me 12 months to finish it, and that's why I don't take on any big jobs these days.

Mate it's your call and ten or even 5 years ago I would say bring it down to me and I will fix it, but these days it's just too much for me.

Frank

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On 01/06/2018 at 8:38 AM, frankS said:

Geoff. If you can see rust on a gal trailer it's coming from the inside out so not good news, unusual for a trailer to rust that far up, the previous owner must have sank the trailer a few times.

The side of that frame can be cut out and piece welded in but IF bottom of rail also rusted it's a lot of work.

Frank

 

To add to what these guys have said.When you see rust emerge,it's always just the tip of the iceberg in how much more there is.The problem with welding is when you weld a rail,beam,plate in.....The weld will be exposed as bare metal on the inside of the trailer as well as a portion of the existing metal due to the weld itself and the heat leaving it exposed to attack by oxygen,let alone water that will cause it to quickly rust again if left untreated.As Frank said it may make more economic sense to just buy another trailer unless you can do the lot yourself and stretch its life at best for another few years.

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Thanks for the replies men.

I have a mig welder, and I have access to metal saws at work also... I'd like to have a crack at building the new undercarriage because like you said Frank they are so bloody expensive for what they are. 

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Geoff. OK then if you are going to do it can I suggest you buy 50 x50 x 3mm black RHS steel, not galled. Weld it all up including all brackets ( must be mirror image of original item ) leave large vent holes at bottom of each piece where it is bent, angled. RHS must have escape holes for gall dipping otherwise there is a risk of the gal exploding and they just won't do the job. Make sure there is vent holes in all areas and that no section is air locked.

When you have it all welded up take to galvaniser and have it hot dipped.

If you want to tackle the front curved section let me know and I will tell you how.

Others on here might like to add to this. OR disagree with my suggestions?.

Frank

PS when measuring allow for thickness of gal. it's not much but it makes a difference to the finished product.

Edited by frankS

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9 hours ago, frankS said:

Geoff. OK then if you are going to do it can I suggest you buy 50 x50 x 3mm black RHS steel, not galled. Weld it all up including all brackets ( must be mirror image of original item ) leave large vent holes at bottom of each piece where it is bent, angled. RHS must have escape holes for gall dipping otherwise there is a risk of the gal exploding and they just won't do the job. Make sure there is vent holes in all areas and that no section is air locked.

When you have it all welded up take to galvaniser and have it hot dipped.

If you want to tackle the front curved section let me know and I will tell you how.

Others on here might like to add to this. OR disagree with my suggestions?.

Frank

PS when measuring allow for thickness of gal. it's not much but it makes a difference to the finished product.

Thanks Frank, I'll start to shop around for the steel and have a heap of questions no doubt too

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The under carriage looks just like my one too, so I had also wondered about lifting the trailer up on jacks and then blocking it up to drop the carriage off and then make a new one.

 

If you decide to go ahead, take lots of photos so I can copy ;-)

 

 

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You should consider using C-Channel instead of tube steel. It can’t rust from inside and can be painted and completely sealed.

Also, galvanising is not your only choice. My trailer has primer and an Enamel top coat. Sealed and no corrosion problems for years.   You could just paint the repaired section and it will still outlast the trailer. 

Edited by Hateanchors

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1 hour ago, Hateanchors said:

You should consider using C-Channel instead of tube steel. It can’t rust from inside and can be painted and completely sealed.

Also, galvanising is not your only choice. My trailer has primer and an Enamel top coat. Sealed and no corrosion problems for years.   You could just paint the repaired section and it will still outlast the trailer. 

I thought about c-section but sort of cant get my head around how I could replicate what I have seeing it is boxed... 

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7 minutes ago, garfield28 said:

I thought about c-section but sort of cant get my head around how I could replicate what I have seeing it is boxed... 

Use the appropriate thickness for strength. Cut/ knotch out the ends to fit. 

Instead of bending for the curves, cut and weld at the correct angle. 

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Based on your bigs it would be worth getting the cross members replaced on the really rusty ones. It doesnt have to be bent either you can weld a straight peice of gal RHS on to it. If you have a mate with a MIG that does good welds your already half way there. As for the rust spotting get a scotchbrite wheel and strip it back, prep and paint it. It will keep you out of trouble.

Biggest thing to look out for are rusty axels, as soon as they pit they can cause issues.

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On 4/4/2019 at 9:39 AM, JA1990 said:

Based on your bigs it would be worth getting the cross members replaced on the really rusty ones. It doesnt have to be bent either you can weld a straight peice of gal RHS on to it. If you have a mate with a MIG that does good welds your already half way there. As for the rust spotting get a scotchbrite wheel and strip it back, prep and paint it. It will keep you out of trouble.

Biggest thing to look out for are rusty axels, as soon as they pit they can cause issues.

Cheers mate for the reply and advice, but I ended up buying a new trailer mate.

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