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Hi guys, so obviously I have caught fish, however, being pretty new to fishing I just can't reliably catch fish. Now, I know that you will always have quiet days out fishing where the fish just aren't biting but I would go so far as to say that I only catch a fish in 1 out of 10 fishing sessions. Yeah I know right?. I'm aware that obviously, I can't substitute experience or become a superstar overnight but I still feel as if I should be able to catch a fish the majority of the time I go fishing. Please help. BTW my local species are bream, flathead, whiting and sometimes leatherjackets.

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Hey pugz

Catching fish consistently is usually the result of many things. 

All of those things in my opinion fall under one umbrella....preparation. All of which are intended to maximise your chances of catching a few.

Before i go out on a trip i usually consider the following.

1. Where am i going?

2. What am i likely to catch there, or, am i intentionally targeting one specific species.

3. Based on the above, what bait and tackle do i need. Do i have it?

This is usually followed by the following considerations, which depending on the location, weather, time of the year etc can be complex and the answers to those will vary throughout the year.

4. What is the best time to fish for that species at that location.....ie, first light? High tide? Low but run in tide?

5. Whats the weather doing, some locations fish well in a north south drift. Others fish better in a east west drift. Even more complex and a little beyond my expertise are other things such as air pressure, lunar phase, changes due to recent rain. 

Other things to consider are fish movements due to breeding, chasing food such as prawn run, run of the mullet etc...... the list goes on and on.

The takeaway from all of the above is, if you want to consistently catch fish, study and learn the area your fishing to maximise your chances. Study and learn your target species, what bait and tackle produces results. Keep a diary of results and eventually you will notice trends and be able to hone in on what works, nd when. 

Edited by GoingFishing
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Yeah thats pretty much right, using fresh or live bait when possible really helps your chances. If your not experienced i would recommend jumping into lures straight away and just sticking with the basics. Try to fish as light as possible for the conditions and fish around low light periods, preferably when they coincide with tides. use reasonable size hooks (not too big) and look for structure. This can be a gutter, a deep hole, a sunken tree, an island, rocks, seaweed and pretty much anywhere fish will feel safe enough to feed aggressively.

good luck

Edited by SickWolf
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Yep, fish light!!!  light sinker, light line 6lb or lower, you will feel the bite, and it makes better sport.

Heaps of people add the biggest lead on the longest rod and cast out to the horizon when are under the wharf.

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Do you have a boat? Or are you land based? A boat makes it easier because you can move around to find fish more easily. But if you’re land based, don’t let that stop you. You can walk and wade sand flats. You can move from gutter to gutter along a beach and you can vary locations along a rock platform. A lot of people these days are going straight into lure fishing but there is a lot to be gained by learning the ropes in bait fishing. Learn how to catch your own bait and you will be off to a good start. For instance, when pumping yabbies, you will spot poddy mullet, small whiting, sting rays, flathead lies etc. Watch what happens as the tide changes. Where does the flow take the silt you’ve pumped out? Where does the “food” flow to? Think like a fish. If you were a fish, where would you like to sit to catch food with a minimum effort? Fish the tide changes. Fish around dawn/sunrise and sunset/dusk, ideally when they coincide with tide changes. Keep records of your sessions. What was the moon phase? Does a particular moon phase seem more successful? What was the tidal variation? The spring tides have a wider variation than the neap tides, which mean a stronger tidal flow. Which seems to be the most productive? How does the water flow in your location on the run in? On the run out? Some spots fish better on the run in, some better on the run out. It depends on the tidal flow over/around structure and the resultant eddies. Use live bait wherever possible. If not live, then fresh. If using lures, think how a live bait would move. Move you lure like that. Work with the tide.

Lots of things to consider, eh? It’s all part of the art of learning fishing! It’s a lifetime learning process. Enjoy your lifetime!

Edited by Berleyguts
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