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Layton

boat trailer guides

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What are the best trailer guides for a quintrex 4.4m boat any suggestions will be appreciated. 

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Best to go with a skid trailer rather than a roller one. Try looking up some of the more popular boat trailer brands and you can see what is available.

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What do you mean by "guide" something to keep the boat straight? something to support the boat on the trailer?

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Tinnies are designed to be supported by the keel when on a trailer.  I have a 5.6 meter Quinnie and have found that the hard blue nylon type with a recess in the middle work best.  I have skids supporting the sides with short v pieces to help center the hull.

The best thing I did was ditch the galvanised roller axles and make my own ones from stainless rod.  Easy launch and retrieve with rollers that never stick.  Ron 

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Thanks for the reply’s something to help keep the boat straight when loading it back on the trailer 

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OK, different thing then, those "Ezy loader" spring loaded gizmos work kind of OK, but any decent wind or current will see the boat just flatten them out and slip off them, a well designed and adjusted trailer should be easy enough to keep straight.

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41 minutes ago, Layton said:

Thanks for the reply’s something to help keep the boat straight when loading it back on the trailer 

After many years loading boats, how far (deep) you back into the water determines how easy it is to keep straight and load a boat while either driving or winding on. You need to trial to find the best spot and remember the water height on the trailer. 

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Or you could use wobble rollers which are great for aligning a smallish tinny onto a trailer. I use the big black ones, and I line then up with the panels on the underside of the tinny. Helps with loading single handed. They don't actually take any wait, but when you ratchet the tie down, they do help with fastening everything up.

Matt

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I recently installed a set of guides for my rear keel roller and it has made the world of difference to loading.  They are almost the same as what Fab1 has done like in this thread:

 

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On 7/3/2019 at 7:47 PM, Hateanchors said:

After many years loading boats, how far (deep) you back into the water determines how easy it is to keep straight and load a boat while either driving or winding on. You need to trial to find the best spot and remember the water height on the trailer. 

What are your key signs that you look for when knowing you've got the right depth? 

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Simple thing heaps of people do wrong is sink their trailer too deep when retrieving  the boat floats off line instead of coming up straight   we see guys at our local ramp having up to 5 goes at getting on straight  after we have our jollies at their expense we usually wander over and tell them bring trailer up about a foot n half  and voila  boat on rollers straight    beers n boat ramps are so meant to entertain

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16 minutes ago, rickmarlin62 said:

Simple thing heaps of people do wrong is sink their trailer too deep when retrieving  the boat floats off line instead of coming up straight   we see guys at our local ramp having up to 5 goes at getting on straight  after we have our jollies at their expense we usually wander over and tell them bring trailer up about a foot n half  and voila  boat on rollers straight    beers n boat ramps are so meant to entertain

For my boat, I like to get my rear roller just under the water. Seems to be enough for me and keeps my XTrail wheels clear of the water, too.

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45 minutes ago, anthman said:

What are your key signs that you look for when knowing you've got the right depth? 

Back down to where the rear of the boat starts to lift off the rollers then come forward so it’s just sitting back on the rear most roller. That’s the spot you want  

Like Rick said, you don’t want the rear floating when the boat is fully wound on. You want it sitting on the rear roller with a little weight. 

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On ‎7‎/‎3‎/‎2019 at 7:24 PM, noelm said:

OK, different thing then, those "Ezy loader" spring loaded gizmos work kind of OK, but any decent wind or current will see the boat just flatten them out and slip off them, a well designed and adjusted trailer should be easy enough to keep straight.

I think the spring loaded ones are called 'Easy glide'. My one works brilliantly, much better than the standard trailer. It doesn't matter how crooked the boat is to start with or how strong the tide is it always ends up perfectly straight on winding in. If the boat is slipping off then it sounds like you have the trailer backed in too deep.

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Couple of things:

1. You should never need to get your car wheels wet. Should not even be close.

2. Water up to hub on trailer wheel is usually deep enough for most sub 5m boats.

3. Rollers are designed to roll. If your keel rollers are not rolling, start there.

4. A floating boat, pulled at bow by winch rope will straighten the boat up.ad it comes into the trailer. 

5. Key is where, how, you start it. I use my winch lug on the boat to just sit up and on my keel roller. I attach the winch rope and wind up. 

6. In heavy wind, or water current. Loading straight needs better tactics or a deckie. On my own, I just make sure the trailer is not as fat into the water, so I can 'hold' the bow using the keel roller and the bow latch. Even if I have to lift the bow up and onto the keel roller a bit. Once done tension is added to the winch rope, the boat pulled up onto the keel roller.

7. Boats should sit on the keel. Weight on keel rollers. Skids and wobble rollers are there only to stop the boat rocking from side to side.

 

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