M1100S

Looking after trailer spare wheel nuts.

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Trading the boat in and wanted to take my spare wheel off from the trailer.... managed to get one bolt off but the other one no chance. took me using a 750mm breaker bar but even then the bolt was seized and i actually sheared the u clamp, and managed to get the wheel off.

 

so my question is, come the new boat when i put the spare wheel back do i put some grease on the threads of the U-bolt ir is there some special product to apply so it does not seize in the future. bugger me if i was stuck on the road.

 

Is there anything else to apply it too as well... wheel nuts ??

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Posted (edited)

Read this...

https://www.crcindustries.com/world-anti-seize/

I use wheel bearing grease on the wheel nuts, 3 or 4 times a year (quick, cheap and simple) and a copper-based anti sieze on the other bolts.

Regardless of what you use...

always carry spare wheel nuts

be prepared to shear a 'frozen' nut/bolt.

Edited by dmck

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Part of my Winter service is to remove the spare wheel and grease the wheel studs on the mount, plus the usual bearings, cables and wiring clean up and check.

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Penrite marine grease.

Cheers.

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Thanks for reminder.   I usually grease mine but they are probably overdue.  The trend these days is to use capped wheel nuts tò reduce water exposure and rusting.  I am going to upgrade mine to capped as well.  Ron 

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To add to what the guys said i use anti seize compound or grease on the threads and on the face of the hubs on trailer wheels and spare.

   For a seized nut there's many ways to get them off but one of the essiest is heating the nut with a blow torch (Portable propane torches from hardware are cheap) then touching a candle stick to the thread area or base of nut.Melted wax will wick down into the threads and it will normally loosen off like butter once this is done.

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I also spray my nuts & wheels with silicone spray which puts a protective film on them when it dries.

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Well sorry guys but I have to disagree with the idea of putting grease on wheel nuts of the trailer. On the spare wheel a thin smear of Vaseline is all that is needed and the nuts should only be used for the spare. 

IF you put grease on a wheel nut it won't find it's proper tension and you will tend to tighten the nut up very tight which will in fact stretch the stud out of shape and could lead to failure , a wheel nut should be tensioned DRY not greased.

Frank

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16 minutes ago, frankS said:

Well sorry guys but I have to disagree with the idea of putting grease on wheel nuts of the trailer. On the spare wheel a thin smear of Vaseline is all that is needed and the nuts should only be used for the spare. 

IF you put grease on a wheel nut it won't find it's proper tension and you will tend to tighten the nut up very tight which will in fact stretch the stud out of shape and could lead to failure , a wheel nut should be tensioned DRY not greased.

Frank

Ahhh good old vaso, 101 uses :whistling:🤣

 

I hear what your saying frank & think your correct but not sure if that theory serves all applications.

Some things I tighten up its specified to remove all the grease/oil before torqueing, some even ask to apply a bit of blue Loctite, but these are in items that are not exposed to salt water & water in general frequently.  

It would be interesting to know what the correct torque is for wheel nuts as some of those rattle guns would far exceed that I would imagine?

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Put a rattle gun on a greased nut/stud and you are just asking for failure. Just wash the wheels at the end of the session.

Frank

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11 minutes ago, frankS said:

Put a rattle gun on a greased nut/stud and you are just asking for failure. Just wash the wheels at the end of the session.

Frank

Yeh I use saltaway when washing down & after the wheels are dry like I was saying I spray the wheels with the silicone spray.

I must admit I have never grease any wheel nuts/studs before.

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Hi,

120lb ( old scale ) is the recommended tension for wheel nuts and a thin film of grease is ok. The grease gets inside both threads and it is easier to get the wheel nuts off. Marine grease is the go.

Cheers.

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5 minutes ago, Rebel said:

Hi,

120lb ( old scale ) is the recommended tension for wheel nuts and a thin film of grease is ok. The grease gets inside both threads and it is easier to get the wheel nuts off. Marine grease is the go.

Cheers.

I don't think you mean 120lb's, I think you mean 120 inch lb's right 🤨

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I kind of do what Frank suggests, but, after I put the nuts on and tightened, I cover the whole lot in marine grease, makes it a dirty job getting them off next time, but, stops it all getting rusted up and they come off easy.

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Hi King chaser,

The Torque wrench I have says, Metres, Footage and LBS. It is the one I lent Russell Crowe from the Gladiator to tighten up the wheel nuts on the Chariots. BC Model.

Cheers.

  • Haha 1

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The. Torque settings will be foot pounds for 1/2 inch drive inch drive and inch pounds will be for 3/8 and 1/4 drive torque wrenches big difference.

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Posted (edited)

Wheel nuts like all nuts have specified torque values depending on application.

  As Frank points out they are "supposed" to be dry/clean along with dry/clean studs and then tightened to specified torque. 

    I've lost count how many times I've  removed and replaced wheels on trailers,cars,horse floats,etc over the years and have used everything from Wd 40,crc,engine oil,tranny fluid,spray greases,etc,etc,etc.

  All wheels & nuts have been put on/off with with anything from basic wheel braces to breaker bars/sockets to rattle guns.

     Iv'e never checked the torque on anything except critical things like cylinder head bolt's on cars etc.

 

        I do start all nuts by hand including wheel nuts and tighten all bolts in a star pattern until tight. 

 There's a difference between tight,tight and tight and you will only gain that from experience regardless of tightening by hand or using rattle guns, etc.

(You get a feel for it).

   Rattle guns have pressure settings not to mention a trigger too.

   I have never lost a wheel,broken a stud or had a stuck wheel on anything in decades doing what i do.

  All i can say is do what you feel works for you that gives you piece of mind as that's all that matters in the end.regardless .

    

     

Edited by Fab1
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Just to be clear this is for the spare wheel / Spare wheel mount not the actual trailer wheels.

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I agree with Frank.

 

I wouldn't use grease on wheel studs on your spare mount you can use it if you like.

I use anti- seize on all my studs and I only use stainless steel acorn nuts on my boat trailer , cheap enough these days but you have to be very careful because S/S nuts can and often grab. If you don't use S/S at least use chrome acorn nuts so your studs will not rust, change the nuts every few years.

If your trailer has Ford studs (1/2") you can do them at 135 NM or 100 Foot pounds 120 foot pounds is far too much for 1/2" 

stud  especially if you use grease on it you will stretch it.

If you have the old Holder 7/16" don't go more than 80 foot pounds or 110 NM.

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I will stick to my story. Never had a problem in over thirty years of trailers.

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