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Motor at Rear or at side??


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So looking to buy a fishing kayak - I've seen most electric motors mounted on the RHS of the kayak (I assume if you are left handed it would be the LHS) but I have also seen motors at the rear of the yak... At the rear seems a sensible position based on physics and a usual outboard motor!  but they obviously work side mounted.

If the motor is side mounted is there a noticeable force pushing the yak  towards the left/right that you would have to control with the paddle?

What are the key differences between side & rear mount? I assume from a control/steering would be the key difference??  

If side mounted - How to you ensure that control/steering is at the right lengths so you don't have to twist your back or reach back?

 

Also whilst we are at it - What size batteries do you guys use? I assume that a deep cycle larger battery will provide more motor time but the compromise is weight/space.  Do you usually run your fishfinder off the same battery (Fused of course) - I guess some LED lights too if you were game enough to be out on the water at dark.

 

Thanks in advance

Let me know if you have a yak you are selling

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Im not a yaker but on the battery you would need to know the total draw of what your using to work out the battery size

https://www.batterystuff.com/kb/tools/calculator-sizing-a-battery-to-a-load.html

https://www.powerstream.com/battery-run-time-calculator.htm

 

You also have to realise that you will only have half the batteries capacity E.g a 100AH battery can only be drawn down to 50AH before it needs to be recharged.

If you constantly drop the charge below that you will only get half the life out of the battery!

 

 

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1 hour ago, kingie chaser said:

You also have to realise that you will only have half the batteries capacity E.g a 100AH battery can only be drawn down to 50AH before it needs to be recharged.

If you constantly drop the charge below that you will only get half the life out of the battery!

 

 

This only relates to agm batteries

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Thanks - makes sense why my Lipo batteries for my RC toys aren't holding charge like they used too 😗

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Posted (edited)

Hi Strex,

Out of curiosity - why an electric motor on a kayak?? Not saying don't do it but if you are getting into kayak fishing part of the joy is combining a bit of exercise with your fishing. Trying to mount a motor on a kayak is a bit of a pain and there are extra items to drag down to the water.

You are literally only a  couple of years older than me so I hope it is not a question of health.

There are a number of pedal powered options (I own a Hobbie Revolution 13) which keeps your hands free for fishing and still get you around pretty well. I've done some big sessions on mine without too much hassle.

Regards,

Derek

PS Have a look at the Hobbie Evolve electric drive to see you they did it:

https://www.hobie.com/accessories/evolve/

 

 

Edited by DerekD
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Just concerned that I do not have the fitness to paddle distance - and if being knackered I want some help getting home - But I thought a motor is the norm although optional.

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Posted (edited)
21 hours ago, strex said:

Just concerned that I do not have the fitness to paddle distance - and if being knackered I want some help getting home - But I thought a motor is the norm although optional.

Hi Strex,

Fair call and a fair concern.

I've had my kayak since 2010 and have easily done  a thousand km on it over the years. I've been on a fair few waterways over the decades and seen a lot of kayaks on the water over the years and from memory (which I hope isn't slipping) I've never personally seen a kayak with a motor on it (a few here and there in forums and boat shows etc. but not in actual use.). Putting aside the fact that I am not the most observant of people at the best of times I believe it is far from the norm.

If you want a motor then most people look at a boat as the layout is designed for it. I suspect it will throw the balance out a bit on a kayak. I have seen a couple of options where the designers have very cleverly incorporated it but most kayaks are not designed for it (no mounting brackets or battery well) so making it work well is a challenge.

I got a mate from Fishraider out on a kayak for a fish about a year ago. He hooked a small king on it. Within a week he had bought an inexpensive kayak. First time out he did the typical thing of going hard. Was shattered pretty soon after. Once I explained that he only needed to go at an easy cruising speed then from then on he has found he can do hours on the water. The harder you paddle the less efficient you become.

I'm floating around the 108kg at the moment. I also bring fishing gear, a sounder, several rods. On my Hobie revolution even fully loaded I can get along at a comfortable 6 to 7km an hour. Typical lazy trips out are often between 7 and 10km. If you are not in a hurry then you will be surprised out how far you get. Sometimes the wind or current can be a bit of a pain but I chose my days. As you are in Epping you have access to some pretty good Sydney waterways within an easy drive.

If you are of average or even a bit below average fitness you might feel it the first 2 or 3 times out but after that it becomes a casual walk in the park (unless you get really ambitious and do some really long trips early on). I have a peddle kayak, whenever I have to use a paddle kayak I get over it pretty quickly and get back to peddle asap. The peddle kayak gives me exercise and keeps my hands free for my rods and fighting a fish.

I put together a little piece as an introduction to kayak fishing 101 in this forum. Have you had the chance to read it? In the end it will be your decision but I'll help where I can. I can even PM you my number if you want to talk about it.

It helps if we have a better understanding of where you are coming from. Your planned fishing location(s) or what type of species you are after. For the money you are likely to be spending with both the kayak, the motor, battery, charger & hassles making it work you might want to look at a peddle kayak before you financially commit to anything. Part of the philosophy behind the peddle kayaks is the legs are used to being used for long distances (e.g. walking or running daily) and they are a stronger muscle group than the arms. I have a Hobie (mirage drive). Another peddle system I have heard of is the Slayer. A mate that had both said the Hobie felt more efficient but the slayer with its propeller system could be operated in reverse and hold position more easily. The newer Hobies have a reversible drive system and the seats are more comfortable.

Regards,

Derek

 

Edited by DerekD
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2 hours ago, strex said:

Just concerned that I do not have the fitness to paddle distance - and if being knackered I want some help getting home - But I thought a motor is the norm although optional.

as Derek said,

start slow with short trips to get used to the yak and what you're capable of

you'll find once you get a good paddle rhythm going you can paddle for long distances without too much drama a good quality paddle makes a big difference

without the electric and battery you'll have a lot more $$$ to put towards a better kayak and other accessories not to mention the weight you save

the cheap kayaks are a good start out I had one originally but they tend to not track straight, I've since upgraded to an "Old town" and can easily paddle twice the distance with less effort, dragon and Viking also produce good quality kayaks for the price

 

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Derek,  and co - thanks for the words - a lot of logic there - your advice is priceless thank you. I did read the 101 piece but will revert and review - many thanks

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Awesome advice from Derek and Co ive done the electric motor side and rear mount on  my Yak not worth the drama, time, cost and extra weight. Spend the $ on a better yak in my opinion. Good luck whatever way you go.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I’ve gone the cheap eBay kayak with a side mounted water snake and mount. It’s great, especially knowing you can paddle pretty much as far as you want and will always be able to get back without having to worry about fatigue. I did get a 40ah lithium battery which is about 3kgs instead of a normal 12V battery which are around 10-13kg. You can get them for about $400, and they are fantastic, if you don’t plan on spending the money on a lithium battery then don’t bother going the electric motor. I actually managed to fit my battery inside the center hatch and ran the wires through the kayak, making the motor simply plug in behind the seat. I’d fish for 6-7 hours and never had the battery run out.

As far as setting the kayak up and carrying extra gear, I got to the point where I was organized enough that I could  set mine up in about 10mins, including all fishing gear, mounting the motor, mounting the battery, and getting on the water. Most of the time it was at 4am in the dark. You just have to be organized, no big deal.

Steering the kayak is a little odd to begin with, especially with the motor on the side but you get used to it. Ensure you mount the motor in a position where you can rest your arm on the steering tiller and allow for a delay in steering response, if you’ve driven a boat you’ll be familiar with how to steer.

Now I have a Hobie Sport and I’d never look back. Better seat, better storage, better balance, faster, and more comfortable over a long day. There are times I wish I had the motor fitted, but it’s a bit of exercise and I don’t get the back and shoulder issues I had with the old paddle kayak.

If you don’t have the budget for a Hobie, then get the electric motor, well worth it and it’ll change your fishing for the better. So often I’d glide past people with the electric humming and they’d comment “that’s a better way of doing it”, “hey that’s cheating” or “I’ve gotta get one of those”. You’ll love it.

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  • 2 months later...

Not my kayak but look at my friend’s setup.

Dual torqeedo ultralight 403AC electric motors. Yes that’s right not one, but two! They’re not cheap solutions if you’re thinking about it, but are very well built. 

He’s retired and doesn’t want to buy a boat and loves kayaking and is willing to spend the $$ to get the most out of life. Not everyone is lucky enough to have options like this, I’m still using the good old legs to pedal around and very jealous especially after a long day on the water. 

 

46ED9AC2-7731-4FDD-8DCB-7626679D34E9.jpeg

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Thats a kayak 🤔

 

Thats about 7K just in electric motors!

 

Well hey, when your that age its better to blow it than to leave it to the kids 😛

Edited by kingie chaser
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I used to have a Canadian canoe with side mounted electric.  You automatically adjust the stearing to compensate the slight offset in direction and don't even notice it.  Found it great to paddle around and used lecky to get home quickly, especially if against wind and current.

Deap cycle batteries are best as you can run flat without damaging them.  Be wary of Lithium batteries as I have noted that Watersnake state in specifications that they are NOT SUITABLE for use with lithium batteries.  Ron

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  • 4 weeks later...

Might be a bit late to respond to this post! I have a number of kayaks mostly Jacksons. I have electric motors i use on 2 of them. Both sit on the side and absolutely useless if you don't have a rudder to steer with. Trying to steer with the motor your pushing against the kayak sideways whereas if you set the motor straight and use your rudder then it steers quite well. Goes without saying the bigger the rudder the better the steering! I use a 120ah dep cycle battery and you can run them almost flat which does them more good then harm, then I charge it on a battery charger that is made for them and leave it connected until the next time out. The charger has the intelligent cycle for this operation and 12 months down the track the battery last just as long  as when I first used it and I run it until the battery indicator on my electric motor tells me to start paddling!😀 

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