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Hi

 

Anyone got a recommendation about what type of dremel, or similar product to buy? I was thinking that it might be time to treat myself while the sales are on, but I don't know which ones to look at it. I'd be interested in something that has a small cutting wheel, and the ability to sand in small gaps.

thanks

 

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Well you cant go past an actual Dremel imo!

I have a basic model(think its the 200 series?),  I would buy one again & upgrade to say a 3000, 4000 or 4300 model.

 

As usual comes down to the coin you want to spend but I think the kits with the tools are good option.

 

 

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I have a Dremel  that I purchased back in the 90's thats still working. About 8yrs ago I had to replace the small silicon tube coupler between the motor and the drive shaft as it perished due to age... thats the only thing thats gone wrong with it.  

Given the age and in anticipation of the Dremel dying at some stage, I impulse bought an Ozito rotary tool (with kit) about 4yrs ago at the B***ngs store ... it has sat on the shelf unused (now past its 3yr warranty) waiting for the Dremel to die ... mind you it was on special for $15 with the kit included so hard to walk past.  

These rotary tools are invaluable. The cutting discs you mention Antony - they'r great for fine cutting of metals - bolts in tight spaces etc. However the most used tool ends for me have been the carbide cutters / an router tips. Great for plunge cutting or reshaping holes to fit switches and accessories.

In hindsight, the only thing I'd now evaluate is whether the 18V cordless models are up to scratch to replace the corded ones. Cordless is just so much more handy working on the boat - buffer, multi tool, soldering iron, hot air gun, drill , impact driver etc etc  all cordless for me now.

Cheers Zoran

PS - what are you making ?

 

Edited by zmk1962
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Just finished cutting out rust from very difficult positions, on my 69 Mustang. 

The dremel with the 25 (?) mm cutting discs were the only thing I could get in there.

MIne is electric and sometimes the cord gets in the way.....

You will never regret getting one.

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1 hour ago, zmk1962 said:

In hindsight, the only thing I'd now evaluate is whether the 18V cordless models are up to scratch to replace the corded ones. Cordless is just so much more handy working on the boat - buffer, multi tool, soldering iron, hot air gun, drill , impact driver etc etc  all cordless for me now.

I hear what your saying about cordless Zoran, that are very handy especially if you have no power in your garage like I do.

I have to run an extension cord out my 4th floor bedroom window every time I want to do someting in the garage¬†ūü•ī.

 

But still I always question the longevity of battery powered gear, even if they are ion lithium & even more so when they are internally powered(non removable batteries).

I¬†still have some of¬†dads old 240v drills from the 60's & they still work a treat, noisy as hell but they still workūüėĄ¬†

 

I know nothing these days is meant to last that long but I laways hate having to buy the same gear again just because of battery failure.

 

In saying that if my Husqvarna petrol chainsaw ever fails I have looked at the new battery versions in most 18V brands & they do stack up very well.  

And the fact when out bush in the 4X4 I wouldnt have to take a different type of fuel would also be good, just charge it up from my duel battery system.

 

The EZ change adapter & cutting discs are great to.

Edited by kingie chaser
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I have a couple of old Dremel's and a newish 3000 model, be careful not to over tighten the bits in the chuck as it is very easy to strip the hold down button and then it becomes a hassle to change bits.

I have 6 x 4" corded grinders of various makes and have different devices in each 2x cordless 5" grinders ( Ozito ) and a couple of  Ozito cordless drills that the batteries won't charge any more, so they just sit on a shelf.

About 12 months ago I bought a Certa 20 volt cordless drill with 2x 4 amp hour batteries from Dick Smith and I can't kill it, best cordless I have used that is within my price range.

The Ozito 18 v cordless stuff are pretty good, I run a blower and a whipper snipper off the 18v battery and it lasts a fair while.

Frank

PS I am always doing projects in the sheds so have a lot of toys.

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21 hours ago, kingie chaser said:

I hear what your saying about cordless Zoran, that are very handy especially if you have no power in your garage like I do.

I have to run an extension cord out my 4th floor bedroom window every time I want to do someting in the garage¬†ūü•ī.

 

But still I always question the longevity of battery powered gear, even if they are ion lithium & even more so when they are internally powered(non removable batteries).

Extension cord from 4th floor¬† ūü§Į¬† ¬† mate ... thats tough !¬†

We're a bit off topic to the OP dremel question, but worth exploring as a consideration. Battery longevity !!! Well I made two decisions on this:

1) only buy tools that have separate batteries (no internal battery). My very first cordless was a Ryobi 7V drill with internal battery - it taught me everything that was wrong with these early cordless models (they were more toys than tools unless you were model making). If the battery is discharged, you stop work until its recharged. If the battery dies, you may as well scrap the tool. 7V just not enough grunt.... tried, 9V (yawn) and 14.4V (getting there) ... and then 18V came out and Bingo ... you could drill masonry !  So first lesson - external battery and minimum 18V, and also invest in several batteries so that you always have a charged battery to clip in. Mind you a single 5Ah battery will often outlast me - driving the buffer it will polish the whole boat. But driving the 115mm grinder it will probs give me 40-50min of continuous grinding.

2) Standardise on a brand/make that offers a range of tools so you can leverage your battery investment. As a DIY guy, Ryobi hit product and price range marks for me ... especially when they offered a 6yr warranty on their gear.  So I have slowly replaced most of my corded gear with Ryobi 18V models. There are now aftermarket sellers that sell compatible batteries at 1/3-1/2 price of the OEM.  I have tried one, and now own 5 x 6Ah LiON batteries. 

Back to OPs question... it occurred to me that another tool to consider  " that has cutting capability, and the ability to sand in small gaps." is a multi tool.  It doesn't have a cutting wheel as such, but has cutting blades of different shapes and sizes. Also very very handy.

Cheers Zoran

 

Edited by zmk1962
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Thanks guys. I'll have a look at some of the dremel models and see what I like the look of.

 

I've finally getting some time to work on my old car, and was looking at ways that I could speed up my work. Sounds like the corded version would still be the go. Just need to look at the models. A couple of items that are need of some TLC

 

PXL_20201122_001710272.jpg.718b3b8229fcfa85501024626f476d78.jpgPXL_20201122_001717677.jpg.8ab5750627f899952f6fb4c9581726f7.jpg

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That Thermostat housing looks like it has a broken lug ?, is it alloy or cast iron ?. What sort of engine is it ?. Maybe 351 Windsor ?.

Whatever it is take your time with getting it clean, use light pressure. Haste makes waste !!.

Frank

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1 hour ago, antonywardle said:

Thanks guys. I'll have a look at some of the dremel models and see what I like the look of.

 

I've finally getting some time to work on my old car, and was looking at ways that I could speed up my work. Sounds like the corded version would still be the go. Just need to look at the models. A couple of items that are need of some TLC

 

PXL_20201122_001710272.jpg.718b3b8229fcfa85501024626f476d78.jpgPXL_20201122_001717677.jpg.8ab5750627f899952f6fb4c9581726f7.jpg

Dremels are great but personally I think they are for pretty lite duty jobs.

Do you have an air compressor??

If I was taking on a project like a car I think I would be getting into some gear with some more grunt & while I am not saying dont get a dremel I if you have a compressor I would be lookking at getting some air tools like this-

https://www.totaltools.com.au/56278-ironair-air-sander-surface-finish-kit-stp7734kia

 

Or this-

https://www.totaltools.com.au/120638-sp-air-sander-gasket-kit-sp2331h-1

 

I always like to get tools that I know will go beyond the job I am doing right now & have multi uses.

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Thanks for the advice. I do have an air compressor and while looking around the shed, I found a multitool, a nail gun, and an air die grinder, in unopened boxes. Must have got them on sale and then hid them from my wife! 

 

The air sander looks like a good purchase too. Maybe it look at them. At this stage, I'm leaning towards a 4300 kit.

 

@frankSthe house is a radiator housing for a 1967 Datsun. I got a replacement one, but I'll keep the original in case I ever get a cnc machine or a welder and what to see if I can fix it. It's pretty unlikely though!

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1 hour ago, antonywardle said:

Thanks for the advice. I do have an air compressor and while looking around the shed, I found a multitool, a nail gun, and an air die grinder, in unopened boxes. Must have got them on sale and then hid them from my wife! 

 

The air sander looks like a good purchase too. Maybe it look at them. At this stage, I'm leaning towards a 4300 kit.

 

@frankSthe house is a radiator housing for a 1967 Datsun. I got a replacement one, but I'll keep the original in case I ever get a cnc machine or a welder and what to see if I can fix it. It's pretty unlikely though!

Nice score, its like finding a $100 note in your jacket you havent worn for 12 months¬†ūüėĄ

 

Good luck with the resto, brings back some memories!

 

I had a 1974 Datsun 240K GL 4SPD hardtop coupe, it was stock but still had a bit of punch, would have loved the GT version.

I wanted to put triple weber's on it but just never got around to it before I sold it, the thing would have flown with those triple webers............................................... :flying:

 

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  • 1 month later...

Molasses mixed with water 10 parts water, 1 part molasses (mixed very well) makes a cheap, very effective and very slow rust remover.  Buff off as much as you can with a wire buff then soak  for up tp 2 weeks. It will remove rust back to pristine steel.  Was well and paint/oil/whatever VERY quickly or you will see the rust growing back as you hold the item.

Another alternative is acetic acid, comes a s a white powder that you mix with water, the more powder the stringer the acid the faster the rust removal.

Again, once removed treat the surfaces quickly.

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