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It is NOT illegal to release carp


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I am not in favour of releasing carp, they are a feral, nuisance and “rats of the waterway”, however, contrary to popular belief, it is not illegal to release them under section 261 of the Fisheries Management Act. - Extract below  is copied from DPI website.

RELEASING CARP

“is not currently illegal to immediately return captured carp to the waters from which they were taken (defence under section 216 of the Fisheries Management Act). However, NSW DPI encourages recreational fishers to retain and utilise any captured carp rather than returning them live to the water.”

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Sounds like even feral & introduced species will be protected if this new animal welfare bill passes!

 

Then wait & see the parties that made it happen start passing the buck the their decisions heavily impact all native species & the man on the land!!

Edited by kingie chaser
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Queensland also had no release laws on carp. About a decade ago there was even a $220,000 fine if you were caught releasing carp into the wild. Not sure if it is still applicable.

Found the original reference: https://www.fishingworld.com.au/news/noxious-fish-net-big-fines

 

Edited by DerekD
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I am at a loss for words. Confirmation those charged with resposibility have no responsibilty at all. Seems to be inceasingly common lately. Please do not return this invasive species to the water

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4 minutes ago, savit said:

I do not remember any related changes in rules for the last decade. Was it actually ever illegal in NSW to release carp?

It's never been illegal to "return" carp pr any other invasive species to the water, it has alwaus been illegal to transport live invasive species, use them as bait or translocate them. Other states stipulate carp (and other i vasive species especially tilapia) must be destroyed and not returned

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What Pickles states is correct, reference the legality. I really dislike killing things unless they are going to provide a food source. However, Carp are an exception (to me) because studies have constantly referred to the BIOMASS of Carp in inland waterways as being around 80%. More simply stated they are in plague proportions. 

I really wish that every angler, every fishing club would make concerted efforts to targeting these species and (at least) try to reduce the ever increasing impact which they have on other species in the systems. 

I deliberately target them and am comfortable in my belief that every one which I take out of the system could produce hundreds of thousands of offspring in its lifetime. I just wish that other anglers felt the same.

1190520564_IMG_3446(1)rs.thumb.jpg.d934da1ee30a3bfcecb8edb205967f27.jpg

bn

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3 hours ago, big Neil said:

What Pickles states is correct, reference the legality. I really dislike killing things unless they are going to provide a food source. However, Carp are an exception (to me) because studies have constantly referred to the BIOMASS of Carp in inland waterways as being around 80%. More simply stated they are in plague proportions. 

I really wish that every angler, every fishing club would make concerted efforts to targeting these species and (at least) try to reduce the ever increasing impact which they have on other species in the systems. 

I deliberately target them and am comfortable in my belief that every one which I take out of the system could produce hundreds of thousands of offspring in its lifetime. I just wish that other anglers felt the same.

1190520564_IMG_3446(1)rs.thumb.jpg.d934da1ee30a3bfcecb8edb205967f27.jpg

bn

I agree 110%

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Carp- definitely not in balance within Aussie freshwater systems. Outbreed and outcompete the locals. Being a bottom feeder in excess numbers they reduce water quality as well. If it is feral it is in peril.

I know carp are not a prestigious target species for fisherman but they do have a lot going for them. Being both easy to catch and hard fighters they are a really good species for novices and kids to hone their skills.

I'm not an ecologist but I understand recreational fisherman have little impact on carp populations. I'd be surprised if we caught even 2%. Even if we went crazy and removed 30%, the population will return to what it was after the next breeding event as there is more food available and more young carp would survive.

At least in rivers I still euthanise all the carp (and redfin) I catch. I'm probably kidding myself but I like to think that at least a few shrimp/yabbies/worms might survive a bit longer to be eaten by a native. Total 1%er but anything we can do to help native fish in waterways where they naturally reproduce is worthwhile. Might have just outed myself as the 1st greenie on Fishraider.

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Not suggesting, just wondering if there were attempts in the past to introduce also some natural carp predators e.g Northern Pike in Aussie rivers?  

If we managed to sell kangaroo meat to russian navy, why not try exporting carp there? I am confident they will eat carp in that part of the world - just ask any local british angler.

As for tilapia - it is  actually one of the largest fish exports in the world, US consumes major share of it (used to be 80%). QLD might have enough stock to pay US for submarine deal LOL.

 

Edited by savit
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44 minutes ago, savit said:

Not suggesting, just wondering if there were attempts in the past to introduce also some natural carp predators e.g Northern Pike in Aussie rivers?  

I think lessons might have been learned after the cane toad disaster 

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58 minutes ago, dirvin21 said:

I think lessons might have been learned after the cane toad disaster 

I seriously doubt that lessons were  learnt - there are plenty of other common 'examples' running around where I live - rabbits, foxes etc etc.

As for fish - obviously redfin and trouts are far from being natives. Was there anything else (fish) locally introduced ?

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1 hour ago, Ganguddy Goodoo said:

Carp- definitely not in balance within Aussie freshwater systems. Outbreed and outcompete the locals. Being a bottom feeder in excess numbers they reduce water quality as well. If it is feral it is in peril.

I know carp are not a prestigious target species for fisherman but they do have a lot going for them. Being both easy to catch and hard fighters they are a really good species for novices and kids to hone their skills.

I'm not an ecologist but I understand recreational fisherman have little impact on carp populations. I'd be surprised if we caught even 2%. Even if we went crazy and removed 30%, the population will return to what it was after the next breeding event as there is more food available and more young carp would survive.

At least in rivers I still euthanise all the carp (and redfin) I catch. I'm probably kidding myself but I like to think that at least a few shrimp/yabbies/worms might survive a bit longer to be eaten by a native. Total 1%er but anything we can do to help native fish in waterways where they naturally reproduce is worthwhile. Might have just outed myself as the 1st greenie on Fishraider.

Haha first Greenie on Fishraider. I think most of us are Greenies when it comes to working within the rules which aim to maintain our hobby (and passion) for the future. I absolutely agree with you about Carp as a great learning capability for (newer) anglers. Often they can be easily hooked but they certainly give a good account of themselves, particularly in snaggy areas. I treat Redfin a bit like Trout in that I like to eat them. Often at Burrinjuck you can get onto a school of them and have great fun. 

Question: Do you get Redfin in the Bidgee near where you are? Locals in the Narrandera - Darlington Point area reckon the Bidgee used to have good stocks of them. I have fished here for 20 yrs and never caught one in the River, I have caught them up to 40 cms in the irrigation channels though. What about Trout, are they in the upper reaches of the Murrumbidgee?

Cheers, bn

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1 hour ago, savit said:

Not suggesting, just wondering if there were attempts in the past to introduce also some natural carp predators e.g Northern Pike in Aussie rivers?  

If we managed to sell kangaroo meat to russian navy, why not try exporting carp there? I am confident they will eat carp in that part of the world - just ask any local british angler.

As for tilapia - it is  actually one of the largest fish exports in the world, US consumes major share of it (used to be 80%). QLD might have enough stock to pay US for submarine deal LOL.

 

To the best of my knowledge Northern Pike have never been introduced into Australian freshwater waterways. They are an apex predator (like Murray Cod). Maybe their introduction could be seen as a benefit, maybe not? I'd be interested in the thoughts of others on that particular topic. They certainly would be great fun to target and catch, not sure of the impact on the native Australian species though.

Comments please?

bn

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Yes, vote for Northern Pike. I assume that natives won't be excluded from pike's menu, however they definitely will have another (better?) chance from natural reduction of carp and redfin population.

As for pike fishing - it is fun, another opportunity for using lures on larger predator in freshwater or when season for other species like murray cod is closed.  Eating - not so much due to multiple bones and sometimes  locally acquired taste.

Between choosing another (carp) virus in a wild (havent we had them enough???!!!) or another fish to reduce carp population - I would choose a natural way/another fish.

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I hate the idea of introducing another species to eradicate an already out of control introduced species.

Sometimes you’ve gotta quit while you’re ahead and just accept that we have to live with the mistakes of the past. 

I can just see us ending up with freshwater fisheries full of carp and pike. No more freshwater natives.

My personal opinion, not here to argue for or against.

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A couple of years ago I visited the Banrock Station Winery in the Riverland area of S.A. Have been there before, cheaper priced wines, reasonably good value if you don't want to spend a fortune.

The staff told me that a few months before we visited, the surrounding wetlands were drained (used as an area to attract various birds and for walking about) and the amount of carp was astonishing.

Tons and tons (now metric tonnes) were taken away by the truckload. Cannot remember the quantity now, but it ended up as fertiliser and took a few days to remove. The owners knew there was a carp problem, but were surprised at how quickly they bred up in large numbers.

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Introducing a new species to control another has blown up in our faces before - cane toads come to mind .

Not a fan of the virus they want to let loose either because if it mutates it could infect our natives .

I would prefer more electro fishing for the big carp  , Habitat restoration for the  natives that will eat the small carp,  carp comps and maybe a competition that could be set up so if you catch a carp , take a photo and post it online and at the end of the year there could be some decent prizes for things like biggest fish , most fish etc and have these set up in lots for different age groups so everyone has a chance of winning - any opportunity to get a kid into fishing is a good thing ! . Our rec fishing licence could fund this easily  if the damned Government stopped sticking it in their pockets . Only one rule - nothing lives ! I have heard of a  few anglers throwing them back because they didn’t want to leave dead fish everywhere especially in places like Parramatta ( which will stink and bring about complaints) - valid point . Personally I would take them home and freeze them then drop them in the bin on rubbish night .

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I don't think Northern Pike would work out in Australia. If they did handle the warmer water temperatures they would likely outgun the natives. Juvenile cod/yellas/bass would get hammered. Agree they would be a cool sport fish.

I'm not even sure they would have much impact on the carp population. Murray the Metery doesn't knock back a carp for breakfast and he/she is having little impact on carp numbers.

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