Jump to content
  • 0

Tongue Eating Louse - cymothoa exigua (Mouth Parisite)


zmk1962
 Share

Question

Hey Raiders,

Not so much an ID question, more an answer really.  But I'm sure we've all seen them  often in Yakkas and Taylor. Also I'm absolutely convinced these critters were the inspiration for the alien movies. Anyway, I've always wondered what they were ... here's the facts:

B16408CE-783C-44D5-8A28-B35BF72C3DE8.thumb.jpeg.2156985cdf22ddb65f86c02a7255b696.jpeg

2FCCA835-EC0E-447A-8667-34744DF29C16.thumb.jpeg.ad7abd38d04ff9d5ce8bbee3306b8abc.jpeg

Cheers Zoran

Edited by zmk1962
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 answers to this question

Recommended Posts

  • 0

Not sure if its a "Cymothoa exigua" because it says it causes the tongue to fall off and becomes the new tongue. What a nasty critter.

I think it may be a different type as the CSIRO have done a study and it doesn't seem to knock the fish around to bad.

https://www.publish.csiro.au/MF/MF9750355

Happy to be corrected though. 🙂

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0

yeah they are funny things, id say 50 odd % of yakkas got them too in some areas always wondered how they'd do for bait though, never put one on a hook

On a slightly unrelated note on parasites, my mate caught a yakka, killed it for strips and a bunch of small bugs flea sized started crawling out from the yakkas gills & mouth 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 0
2 hours ago, Restyle said:

On a slightly unrelated note on parasites, my mate caught a yakka, killed it for strips and a bunch of small bugs flea sized started crawling out from the yakkas gills & mouth 

That is because the female is pregnant with dozens of babies and when she is attacked/poked/prodded, she splits her abdomen and the little babies crawl out, ready to swim off and attack some other fish.

When I see that happening, I squash them all. 🤣

Yakkas are the main ones that are attacked via the mouth, also trevally at times.

There are other species that are attached to the pectoral fins of whiting and tailor, though not that common.

Another species attaches itself under the throat of small red bream.

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      69.6k
    • Total Posts
      573.3k
×
×
  • Create New...